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#1 Gary McClurg

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Posted 31 August 2007 - 10:52 AM

This post is meant to finally get real world answers...

1. When can you bring the footage into FCP and edit.

I was under the impression at NAB... but someone who is interested in the camera... told me its still coming...

2. What type of monitor for 2k in production and post...

3. How much does a gig of hard drive space hold...

I've never been a tech guru... so I would like it in simple math... 2 gigs = 1 minute...

4. What features are not working yet?

5. Let say I shoot 2k (future proof) but my first release is only 1080p. How much storage will I need to back that footage up and how would I save it?

In the past I did get an email from owner #8 to check out the camera... thought about emailing him again and see if I can still check out the camera... and would he or can he come on here and post the good and the bad about the camera...

Yes I know that I can go on redusers.net... but I think it'll be a while before anything really bad or not so much bad... but bugs... problems else will be really talked about...

Now that the camera was to be shipped today... its time for the real answers to begin...
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#2 Carl Brighton

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Posted 31 August 2007 - 08:27 PM

This post is meant to finally get real world answers...

Yes I know that I can go on redusers.net... but I think it'll be a while before anything really bad or not so much bad... but bugs... problems else will be really talked about...

Shame on you for even suggesting such a thing! The RED is created (and crated)
PERFECT!!!
STONE THE BLASPHEMER!!!
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#3 Gavin Greenwalt

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Posted 01 September 2007 - 01:44 AM

This post is meant to finally get real world answers...

3. How much does a gig of hard drive space hold...


100 Gigs per Hour of 4k. About 30 Gigs per hour for 2k. (Wavelet RAW)

or

1.66 GBs per Minute for 4k or 400MB per Minute for 2k. (Wavelet RAW)

About 10 hours per Terrabyte is a good rule of thumb for 4k.
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#4 Gary McClurg

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Posted 01 September 2007 - 08:14 AM

100 Gigs per Hour of 4k. About 30 Gigs per hour for 2k. (Wavelet RAW)

or

1.66 GBs per Minute for 4k or 400MB per Minute for 2k. (Wavelet RAW)

About 10 hours per Terrabyte is a good rule of thumb for 4k.


Thank you Gavin...

This is from somwhere else... didn't post the whole thing... pretty long...

Finally we have Wavelets which come in both lossless and lossy flavors. Despite the recent spike in interest in wavelets they aren?t some crazy new fangled invention. Several solutions have been commercially available for several years such as Bink Video which uses a hybrid wavelet/DCT scheme to compress videos for in-game cinematics. Fundamentally Wavelets share a great deal in common with DCT compression however it features one important distinction. A wavelet image is able to scale its sample size from a single pixel to the entire image depending on the content. If an image is 32pixels by 32pixels the wavelet will first evaluate all 32x32 boxes, then reduce it to 16x16, 8x8...and so on and so forth until finally reducing the image to a 1x1 pixel sample. Where there is fine detail, smaller, more refined boxes will be used. If the image detail is courser than the designated quality setting requires the encoder will discard those samples 'revealing' the lower resolution below. This results in more detail remaining in the areas that need it most and less detail where it would be unnecessary. It?s all very similar to how a painter will build up from large general brushes and washes to smaller detailed brushes. This method works especially well when you?re ?short? on bandwidth and require heavy compression. Wavelets also work especially well on many digital cinema cameras due to the lack of high frequency grain allowing them to heavily compress low contrast areas without a reduction in the SNR. It?s actually that side effect which has led to wavelets being employed as a noise and grain reduction algorithm.


So are Wavelets the be-all-end-all compression scheme? As all things in this world it isn?t as cut and dry as one might hope. Wavelets do offer some very distinct advantages over DCT. As the file size decreases the image tends to degrade much more gracefully and organically. Instead of ending up with a bunch of unnatural blocks wavelets tend to leave the noisy, low contrast areas of the image softer. In green screen scenarios this can actually be advantageous as it?ll intelligently reduce the noise in the large flat green areas while holding on to detail in the edges and hair. However all of this adaptive intelligence comes at a cost in speed. Compared to most DCT implementations your average Wavelet is downright sluggish, a fact which has kept wavelets out of the mainstream until now. That being said, wavelets have one last trick in their bag which is a feature pretty much incidental to their design. Because a wavelet is built up of progressively more refined levels of detail, stripping off a few top layers is relatively trivial. By specifying the ?top? resolution you want decoded your wavelet footage can appear to the application as any 1/(2^N) resolution proxy without re-encoding. In editing scenarios this allows you to edit at 1k and then render out a 4k conformed timeline with the flip of a switch. Theoretically one should be able to do this in any Quicktime compatible editing or compositing application, however it is my experience that at the moment compatibility is still pretty spotty.

So the question is... can you cut today with FCP... or it still a plug in or two away...

Edited by Gary McClurg, 01 September 2007 - 08:17 AM.

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#5 Gary McClurg

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Posted 01 September 2007 - 12:20 PM

Pulled this from HDforIndies...

Question was asked if there would be open source plugins - Graeme responds "They're not open source" - implying that there are plugins, just not open source. Whether that API is made public or licensed, ever, is not answered there.

Same holds true for the SI2K... if you have to send money to edit the footage that you shot with Red... kinda in my opinion defeats the purpose of rentals...

Also if you can not cut Red footage on FCP yet... then again... what is the cost of doing a down convert and then going in and doing an online...

I guess I'll email a buddy who seems to know a bit about Red...

Edited by Gary McClurg, 01 September 2007 - 12:21 PM.

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#6 Gavin Greenwalt

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Posted 01 September 2007 - 03:49 PM

No worries. REDCine, REDAlert! and REDQuick are all freeware free license applications. FXGuidePhD just confirmed this.

So far REDCine and REDQuick are not ready for release but REDAlert! is available for OSX Intel Macs (*Gag*).

REDCine: EDL footage pulling, Basic One-Light Grading, Crop, rescale, Export, multi-clip coloring.
REDQuick: Quicktime Wrapper.
REDAlert!: Baby REDCine: curves, contrast, sharpening, rescale, export. (Much like Photoshop's RAW importer).

All free.

Edited by Gavin Greenwalt, 01 September 2007 - 03:50 PM.

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#7 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 04 September 2007 - 12:26 PM

http://www.redexerciser.net/

I don't see what the big deal is ;)
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#8 Mitch Gross

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Posted 04 September 2007 - 12:44 PM

http://www.redexerciser.net/

I don't see what the big deal is ;)


Isn't it funny how their logo is so similar? I wonder what the crew was talking about when they shot the infomercial?
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#9 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 04 September 2007 - 01:58 PM

Yeah, I saw the commercial yesterday for the first time and laughed at that...of course, no one else around me understood what I was laughing at.
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#10 Laurent Andrieux

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Posted 13 September 2007 - 05:38 PM

Excellent ! :lol:
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#11 John Sprung

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Posted 13 September 2007 - 05:56 PM

Isn't it funny how their logo is so similar? I wonder what the crew was talking about when they shot the infomercial?

Have a look at BBC World News here on PBS. Their logo isn't quite as close....



-- J.S.
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The Slider

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