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Kodak 200T vs Kodak 100D Ektachrome


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#1 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 02 September 2007 - 08:59 PM

I didn't get a chance to do an exact test since I was involved in an actual film shoot, however I have noticed that the 200T does not seem to need filtering for outdoors, is that crazy or what? (as in the colorist at Spectra is able to transfer the 200T without a filter and get proper color, perhaps other rank places can as well?).

So not needing the filter, it also appears that if I set the f-stop once and don't change it, the 200T will actually have more lattitude than the Ektachrome 100D and hold exposure better even in overexposure situations. This is based on recent footage that I shot, however it wasn't an actual true test where I was able to switch cartridges in an instant before lighting conditions changed.

I am now really curious to do an actual test in which I set an f-stop, shoot with the 200T, then switch to the 100D, and see how the two films hold up in a situation in which the films might be slightly overexposed. The reason this is important to know is that I don't like using ND's and I don't like my f-stop to go above an f11-f16 split, which in outdoor situations can result in the Ektachrome 100d being overexposed whereas it appears the 200T will still hold.

if this turns out to be verified by myself or others than the 200T becomes a really useful stock because as the day turns to night one now has gained at least one stop of sensivity for outdoor shots and perhaps one can has also gained 2.5 f-stops of sensivity for indoor shots.
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#2 Joseph White

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Posted 02 September 2007 - 10:13 PM

well by virtue of the fact that the 100d is a reversal film (historically with a much smaller latitude) and the 200t is not only a negative stock but a vision2 stock (kodak's line with increased latitude even for a negative stock - definitely less snappy than the older 74), i'm not surprised that you're finding the 200t a more utilitarian stock to shoot. in terms of not correcting for daylight, ive used the 17 outside with and without filtration and definitely found that using an 85 gave me a much more naturalistic feel, but you might like the look of just correcting it in the transfer better - it's pretty subjective.

a lot of post houses have told me that they really don't require us to use color correction filters as they can do everything, but unless i'm going for a cooler, more washed-out sheen, i generally just use the 85 and call it a day.

i shot a movie, albeit on 35mm, with the 17 and found that i could go pretty hot in my highlights and have plenty of information, where there have been times shooting the 85 or older velvia and have found that things 2 stops over are just GONE.

anyhow, post some stills if you get the chance. the 100d looks AMAZING cross-processed, its fun if you haven't messed around with it yet. and thats the best thing about super 8 - its cheap so messing around won't break the bank!

best,
joe
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#3 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 02 September 2007 - 10:20 PM

Why not use ND filters so you can correctly expose a film stock in sunlight?

In direct sunlight on a clear day, you get a little over an f/16 at 50 ASA at 24 fps with a 180 degree shutter, so an ND or a Pola is necessary for 100 ASA stocks and higher.

Just get an ND.60 or a Pola and you'll be covered most of the time.
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#4 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 02 September 2007 - 11:03 PM

Why not use ND filters so you can correctly expose a film stock in sunlight?


The viewfinder darkens.
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#5 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 02 September 2007 - 11:32 PM

Wear dark sunglasses until you put your eye behind the camera -- it helps.

I used to shoot Super-8 all the time with either a Pola for color work or a red filter for b&w work in sunshine.
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#6 Fran Kuhn

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Posted 02 September 2007 - 11:53 PM

The viewfinder darkens.


Hello Alessandro,

Using ND filtration won't make the viewfinder any darker than if you use no ND and stop down to the correct aperture. The same amount of light will come through the viewfinder if the aperture is set to t16 as will be transmitted at t8 using an ND 0.6.

-Fran
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#7 jacob thomas

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Posted 03 September 2007 - 04:33 AM

Hello Alessandro,

Using ND filtration won't make the viewfinder any darker than if you use no ND and stop down to the correct aperture. The same amount of light will come through the viewfinder if the aperture is set to t16 as will be transmitted at t8 using an ND 0.6.

-Fran


On most Super 8 camera's the viewfinder light is split off before the aperture so the viewfinder stays bright when stopped down.

Edited by jacob thomas, 03 September 2007 - 04:36 AM.

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#8 Mitch Perkins

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Posted 03 September 2007 - 09:07 AM

I didn't get a chance to do an exact test since I was involved in an actual film shoot, however I have noticed that the 200T does not seem to need filtering for outdoors, is that crazy or what? (as in the colorist at Spectra is able to transfer the 200T without a filter and get proper color, perhaps other rank places can as well?).


I've been shooting/transfering gobs of 200T for a wedding prodco the past couple of summers. The Nikon Superzoom 8 I've been using doesn't allow for the filter after the notchless cart has pushed it out of the way, and there's no time for mounting filters. With WB adjustments, WB shift adjustments, and shifting (increasing/decreasing) colour temp of the projector lamp during telecine, I'm able to achieve what I'd call very pleasing, if not technically proper colour.

"Proper", however, is not always what you're after - even asa ratings are/were decided by a roomful of folks looking at bracketed pics and deciding which one looks "most right" to them. One is well within one's rights to disagree with them 100% of the time.~:?)

So not needing the filter, it also appears that if I set the f-stop once and don't change it, the 200T will actually have more lattitude than the Ektachrome 100D and hold exposure better even in overexposure situations.


The 200T will indeed have more latitude than the Ektachrome 100D, but f-stop should still be changed - I use the "sunny 16" rule, opening up a stop or two in shade.

Reversal pretty much has to be nailed - a little over for paler colours, a little under for richer colours, you know the score...

Mitch
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#9 Fran Kuhn

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Posted 03 September 2007 - 01:30 PM

On most Super 8 camera's the viewfinder light is split off before the aperture so the viewfinder stays bright when stopped down.

Hi Jacob,

So the aperture is located in the camera body?

-Fran
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#10 Andy_Alderslade

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Posted 03 September 2007 - 02:52 PM

Hi Jacob,

So the aperture is located in the camera body?

-Fran


Yes, this is true of almost all super 8 cameras. The exceptions are the cameras with removable lenses, like the Bealieu cameras.

It had a great advantage for the amateur, the viewfinder stayed constantly bright. Of course less good for the student, who is partially being cut out of the process.
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#11 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 03 September 2007 - 03:07 PM

Yes, this is true of almost all super 8 cameras. The exceptions are the cameras with removable lenses, like the Bealieu cameras.

It had a great advantage for the amateur, the viewfinder stayed constantly bright. Of course less good for the student, who is partially being cut out of the process.


That's why I always look at a scene prior normally before looking through the viewfinder to see if I can memorize it for later recall. Since I shot on Kodachrome 40 for so long another thing I do is try to recall what f-stop I would have shot a scene in in Kodachrome 40, than I change the f-stop based on the different sensitivity of the newer film stock I am using.

If I recall I would have shot a scene at f 2.8 with Kodachrome 40 outdoors, than I am comfortable shooting it at f5.6 on Vision 200T therefore I am using a 2 f-stop offset.
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