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NTSC and PAL


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#1 Ken Minehan

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Posted 04 September 2007 - 11:45 PM

Hi guys. I am doing a helicopter shoot of Tokyo city on the 18 sept. The helicopter is fitted with a camera on the nose, and there are decks inside the helicopter where you do the recording on to tape. The system is NTSC.

They have told me that all i need to bring is the tapes, and everything else is sorted by them. This may sound like a silly question, but is there a difference between NTSC tapes and PAL tapes?
So can i buy the tapes here in Singapore (PAL country) and use it for the recording of the helicopter (NTSC system) shoot in Japan?

thanks
Ken
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#2 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 05 September 2007 - 10:16 AM

The tapes are the same, but you'll find that the running time you can record will differ.
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#3 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 05 September 2007 - 11:41 AM

This is not necessarily the case. For example, DVCAM records four tracks per frame in NTSC, but five in PAL, since the data density per frame is higher, but over time it's the same. DVCAM tapes therefore last exactly the same amount of time in PAL or NTSC. However, even if you are using a format which does differ, it really doesn't matter - the tape is identical.

What may cause you problems is that the EIAJ variant of NTSC used in Japan uses no 7IRE setup. You might find your blacks appear crushed if you replay the tape in a standard NTSC environment. In some cameras, this is a menu option.

Phil
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#4 John Holland

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Posted 05 September 2007 - 12:02 PM

This is not necessarily the case. For example, DVCAM records four tracks per frame in NTSC, but five in PAL, since the data density per frame is higher, but over time it's the same. DVCAM tapes therefore last exactly the same amount of time in PAL or NTSC. However, even if you are using a format which does differ, it really doesn't matter - the tape is identical.

What may cause you problems is that the EIAJ variant of NTSC used in Japan uses no 7IRE setup. You might find your blacks appear crushed if you replay the tape in a standard NTSC environment. In some cameras, this is a menu option.

Phil

F--K me what does that mean Phil ? John.
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#5 John Sprung

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Posted 05 September 2007 - 12:25 PM

Step back and look at the big picture:

Why spend the big bucks on a helicopter ($1k+/hr here in LA) and only have 480 line interlaced vintage 1953 NTSC to show for it? Especially in Japan, it should be no problem to find 1080p/24 on a helicopter, and come back with much more marketable stock footage. Since you're in a PAL place yourself, if the project is intended for there, an upconversion from NTSC to PAL will cost you a lot in motion artifacts and resolution. 1080p/24 (or 25) makes great looking PAL.




-- J.S.
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#6 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 05 September 2007 - 12:55 PM

> what does that mean

See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NTSC-J

> Why spend the big bucks on a helicopter ($1k+/hr here in LA) and only have 480 line interlaced vintage 1953 NTSC to show for it?

Quite.

Oh, and: There is actually one circumstance in which tape type matters - if you've used a tape to record PAL, you really don't want to try and re-record NTSC over the top. I suspect that in the case of modern formats like DVCAM again it won't be a problem, but you'd be asking for trouble on Beta SP.

Phil
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Aerial Filmworks

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