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filters?????


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#1 Dean Babis

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Posted 06 September 2007 - 07:58 AM

hello i want to ask first if the ac has to have his own filters in a project or the rental house give them and second what are the differences from filter company to another in the same filters i know tiffen only are they others?????? thnx guys
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#2 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 06 September 2007 - 11:33 AM

The only equipment an AC has to "own" is everything needed to prep and maintain the camera for a shoot. Lens tissue, cleaner, tape measure, orange sticks, dark bag, dry erase marker, etc., etc., etc...

If any filters are needed, then the basics should have been ordered from the rental house, 85, pola, ND's. DP's that I've worked with who like to use diffusion filters usually own their own sets of those if they're the type who like to work with them.

You'll find Tiffen filters are generally higher quality, more durable and provide more information about the effects of those filters due to the amount of research and testing that goes into them. There are other brands, namely Hoya filters. They're cheaper but work nearly as good.

Edited by Jonathan Bowerbank, 06 September 2007 - 11:38 AM.

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#3 Kieran Scannell

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Posted 06 September 2007 - 02:21 PM

Jonathan you should expect a nasty e-mail from Schneider Optics who have been producing quality filters ( i have 10 ) for as long as i can remember!

Kieran.
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#4 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 06 September 2007 - 05:35 PM

Jonathan you should expect a nasty e-mail from Schneider Optics who have been producing quality filters ( i have 10 ) for as long as i can remember!


Oh yeah, them too

Can't make everyone happy I guess ;)
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#5 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 07 September 2007 - 02:41 AM

Jonathan you should expect a nasty e-mail from Schneider Optics who have been producing quality filters ( i have 10 ) for as long as i can remember!

Kieran.

:lol: What's cool about diffusion filters is that there's a lot of variety out there, ie. Tiffen makes Promists, Schneider makes Classic Softs, etc. It's fun to try out new kinds and you can't do that if you only stick to one manufacturer out of misguided loyalty or something (not saying that's you, Kieran).
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#6 Jon Kukla

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Posted 07 September 2007 - 04:06 PM

Very good point about different manufacturers' filters having variations, even if they have the same name. While standard correction filters like 85s and so on are usually fairly consistent, different filter brands for say an Antique Suede will each have a distinct color rendering from each other.

There are a few places, like South London Filters (and I know they have a US company they work closely with), which actually specialize in this and carry just about every type of filter from every company in every size. Makes for very handy comparisons. While there are standards like Tiffen and Schneider, of course what matters most is the look that you get out of them. Play around and see what you like.
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#7 Dean Babis

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Posted 08 September 2007 - 05:49 AM

so it goes on what is better for you right i wil keep that in mind thnx
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#8 James Puli

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Posted 08 September 2007 - 07:49 AM

I carry a 4x4 optical flat (piece of clear glass basically) in my kit when i'm focus pulling.

I just find that its a handy one to have, especaially when you dont know your locations and you may or may not get one from the rental company (i tend to forget to ask for them unless i know im going to need one).

I know a few AC's who have a few of the essentials 85's, ND's, Polas, Grads ... but I find I tend to work with DOP's who have their own kits these days ... they carry them around in their briefcase next to their meters as part of their essential kit.

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#9 Chris Clarke

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Posted 14 September 2007 - 02:56 AM

Very good point about different manufacturers' filters having variations, even if they have the same name. While standard correction filters like 85s and so on are usually fairly consistent, different filter brands for say an Antique Suede will each have a distinct color rendering from each other.


A bit off subject....
I've just been working with a DoP who was using Formatt Antique Suede's for colour correction.
We were shooting with 5212 and 5217 with mostly an Antique Suede 2 (2 stops) to correct the daylight light instead of an 85.
Haven't seen any rushes but look forward to it.
You might catch it later in the year: HBO/BBC "Churchill At War".
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#10 Jon Kukla

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Posted 14 September 2007 - 11:52 AM

Chris, who else was on the camera crew for that gig? I seem to remember one of my friends mentioned working on it, but I can't for the life of me remember whom it was.

Edited by Jon Kukla, 14 September 2007 - 11:53 AM.

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#11 Logan Schneider

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Posted 14 September 2007 - 12:28 PM

Filters are a great way to make extra money as an AC if you have a DP that will get production to rent them. Many, many 1st AC do this. Also, many DPs make extra money renting filters to production. It takes about 30-50 rental days to pay them off, which is about 1/3 to 1/2 of normal film gear.
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#12 Chris Keth

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Posted 14 September 2007 - 04:40 PM

Filters are a great way to make extra money as an AC if you have a DP that will get production to rent them. Many, many 1st AC do this. Also, many DPs make extra money renting filters to production. It takes about 30-50 rental days to pay them off, which is about 1/3 to 1/2 of normal film gear.


That's not a bad idea. I've been wanting to assemble a set of my preferred filters for a while, too.
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