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Film Technology in Post Production 1997


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#1 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 09 September 2007 - 04:50 AM

Mister Case, Sir, Is your 1997 version of Film Technology in Post Production still valid or should I hold off and get the newer edition? B)
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#2 K Borowski

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Posted 13 September 2007 - 01:48 PM

Well, keeping in mind I am only a very well-educated amateur, you have the same technology as you did in 1997, but there are obvioulsy much greater utilizations of 2K digital scanning than there were then, and have been significant improvements in scanner speed.

Really, as far as scanning goes, I can get a scanner made in 1994 (keep in mind this is for non-cine negatives, cine scanners are better, faster, and cost disproportionally more) that is, in almost all ways, better than the most high-end Nikon film scanner made today. The Nikon will probably scan in 1/10 of the time though.

The only improvements that I am aware of between 1997 and now in the actual technology of ECN-2 and ECP stocks are double electron sensitization in 2002, improvements in the durability of film support base and sprocket holes, an almost total transition to Estar print stock (I don't believe this transition really hit full speed until around '98), and metricization of chemistry sizes here in the US.

Most of this stuff is signifacant in theory, but makes no practical difference from the standpoint of laboratory production or film photography.

All of the advancements that are of any significant interest to you are in the digital realm, which may by virtue of the fact that you have a film lab make them insignifacant to you ;-)

In terms of the new stocks, there may be a slight change in your printer lights with Vision2 than with the older EXR and Visions, but I have found that Kodak's numbers are far more consistant from stock to stock to stock than are Fujis, which seem to be all over the place

Regards,

~KB
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#3 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 28 September 2007 - 03:36 AM

Thanks Karl, I bought the book. :D
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#4 K Borowski

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Posted 01 October 2007 - 06:42 PM

Thanks Karl, I bought the book. :D


Well. . . was I right, or was I full of sh it? ;)

~KB
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#5 Dominic Case

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Posted 02 October 2007 - 08:49 AM

Hey, I've been busy! Didn't see this question until just now. So, as Karl's stepped in with a nice preface to the second edition of my book, I don't need to say much.

The second edition is updated - but much of the fundamental technology is still the same: the laws of physics and optics and chemistry don't change a lot. However, the way we use that technology does change, though not as fast as you'd think. New stuff arrives quickly, old stuff dies away much more slowly.

The second edition is also (I think) much better organised, it's easier to find what you want in the book - and it also has a glossary and index that were missing from the first edition. I'd get the second edition every time!

If you are operating a film laboratory (rather than using one as a customer), then I'd also recommend an older book - Motion Picture Film Pocessing - also a Focal Press book, also by myself. It dates back even earlier, 1987 from memory - and it's out of print but Amazon occasionally turns up a copy. There is more operational detail in that one that is mainly of interest to a lab technician (that's why it went out of print) - as well as some of what is also in the new book.

It's old, but still mostly valid.
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#6 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 03 October 2007 - 03:10 AM

Thank you, sir, I will endeavor to secure Motion Picture Film Processing. I also look forward to reading your second edition of Film Technology in Post Production. Things are getting closer and closer to me having everything I need to complete a film from concept to distribution print and possibly even a limited piece of distribution. I still lack a few important items like an edge coding machine, a portable interlock 35mm projector, money....BUT these things will come.

I want to start filming some second unit stuff for Blood Moon as well as do some screen tests and I might as well start learning how to process the footage. I have NO DOUBT your books will prove an invaluable resource. I just bought the '97 edition of Film Technology in Post Production a few days ago and it has not yet arrived but is on it's way. Now my search begins for Motion Picture Film Processing which I will seek out with quest-like dedication until it is in my hot little (OK big grungy apelike) hands so that I may drink from the well of your knowledge....and I mean that in a TOTALLY non-gay way. Thanks again-The Captain B)
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#7 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 03 October 2007 - 03:41 AM

Well. . . was I right, or was I full of sh it? ;)

~KB


Well sir, I have NOT, as yet, received my book, HOWEVER, after having read both your and Mr. Case's replies, I'm willing to bet diamonds to cow patties, site unseen, that you are definitely NOT full of poop. Thank you again for your insight into this matter. -The Captain B)
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Metropolis Post

Opal

Glidecam

Willys Widgets

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Technodolly

Aerial Filmworks

Rig Wheels Passport

The Slider

CineTape

CineLab

Wooden Camera

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Abel Cine

rebotnix Technologies

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Tai Audio

Visual Products

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS