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Dismantling Cameras


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#1 Terry Mester

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Posted 11 September 2007 - 08:46 PM

Dismantling Cameras

I need advice from experienced users who've taken apart Super8 Cameras. How does the Lens come off the Camera? Does it unscrew from the outside on a regular Camera, or is there something inside holding it in place? I have a Sankyo Super CM400 and an Argus.

Also, how do you take apart the outer shell on a Sankyo? I've removed the only visible Screws, but it's still holding solidly together. I don't think they could have been dumb enough to glue the shell together. Have you ever seen any Screws covered over by a Label? I'm in complete disbelief that the Camera's shell isn't coming apart. I can see where it's supposed to separate, but I of course don't want to risk breaking it. The Japanese are known for making things complicated, but making a Camera this complicated to dismantle is ridiculous. My Argus came apart very easily. Although the Sankyo is in mint condition, the inside of the Lens needs cleaning, and I want to re-lubricate the Clutch and Gears. Thanks for your help.
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#2 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 12 September 2007 - 02:05 AM

Dismantling Cameras



Many times the screws are hidden behind labels and things. I recommend you take a picture of each and every step you make. The most difficult is getting the buttons back into the right position so the exterior button positions match the interior settings correctly.

There's also the technique where you put all the screws in rows, the top row being the first screws you took off (and therefore the last ones you put back on.). Strips of tape can be a useful way of keeping your screws from getting loose.

By the way, I DO NOT recommend taking apart Super-8 cameras because the odds that you will actually get it back together equal to what it was before are very remote. Notice I haven't even mentioned the even lower odds that one will actually improve the camera.
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#3 Don Brown

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Posted 12 September 2007 - 02:28 AM

Dismantling Cameras

I need advice from experienced users who've taken apart Super8 Cameras. How does the Lens come off the Camera? Does it unscrew from the outside on a regular Camera,


Hi Terry
I have been trying to get behind a lens on a Nalcom 800 (not the model with the removeable lens)
its been sitting on my bench for weeks I can't see anywhere that removes lens


Regards

Don
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#4 Nick Mulder

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Posted 12 September 2007 - 02:52 PM

One lovely surprise that I dread is finding a reverse thread screw ... You put all your force into tightening the damn thing even more than before and then stripping the top off it for added fun - Advice at this point, is always use the right type and size driver for the screw you are working with (yip, go and buy a heap more) ...

I am yet to find one on a cine camera but have encountered them in stills - The screws that fasten the prism holder thingy in Bolex cameras were so tight I thought they could have been reverse, there was no good reason for it though so I took a punt and put my gorillas at work in the right direction - lucky :lol:

ah the joys of ruining our cameras!
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#5 Chris Keth

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Posted 12 September 2007 - 04:05 PM

One lovely surprise that I dread is finding a reverse thread screw ... You put all your force into tightening the damn thing even more than before and then stripping the top off it for added fun - Advice at this point, is always use the right type and size driver for the screw you are working with (yip, go and buy a heap more) ...

I am yet to find one on a cine camera but have encountered them in stills - The screws that fasten the prism holder thingy in Bolex cameras were so tight I thought they could have been reverse, there was no good reason for it though so I took a punt and put my gorillas at work in the right direction - lucky :lol:

ah the joys of ruining our cameras!


As an AC and having repaired cameras before, you frighten me a bit. I shuddered as I read your post ;)
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#6 chuck colburn

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Posted 12 September 2007 - 05:18 PM

I serviced, repaired and built motion picture cameras and lenses for thirty years and never once ran into a left hand thread.

Edited by chuck colburn, 12 September 2007 - 05:20 PM.

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#7 Terry Mester

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Posted 12 September 2007 - 05:42 PM

Thanks for your tips. There were only four visible screws to be removed, but it won't come apart without the Lens being removed. I can tell by looking at it that the Lens was the last component to be attached. The front shell clearly pulls out frontwards which requires that the Lens be removed first. I think that the Lens could be a reverse thread, but I'm not going to turn it too hard without knowing for sure. I can only hope that there isn't some sort of "self-locking mechanism" or glue which would make it impossible to remove. I hope that they wouldn't have been that dumb, but, having done work on cars, I know how stupid these "industrial designers" can be.
Do you think that Pro8mm would be willing to offer some free advice on this matter, or is it a better bet that they don't bother cleaning the internal Lens on the Cameras they refurbish?

Chuck, did you work on S8 Cameras? How does the Lens come off?
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#8 Nathan Milford

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Posted 12 September 2007 - 06:19 PM

Just for a reference (as your camera is not listed), there is a nice Super8 repair reference at Super8wiki, here.
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#9 chuck colburn

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Posted 12 September 2007 - 06:29 PM

Thanks for your tips. There were only four visible screws to be removed, but it won't come apart without the Lens being removed. I can tell by looking at it that the Lens was the last component to be attached. The front shell clearly pulls out frontwards which requires that the Lens be removed first. I think that the Lens could be a reverse thread, but I'm not going to turn it too hard without knowing for sure. I can only hope that there isn't some sort of "self-locking mechanism" or glue which would make it impossible to remove. I hope that they wouldn't have been that dumb, but, having done work on cars, I know how stupid these "industrial designers" can be.
Do you think that Pro8mm would be willing to offer some free advice on this matter, or is it a better bet that they don't bother cleaning the internal Lens on the Cameras they refurbish?

Chuck, did you work on S8 Cameras? How does the Lens come off?


No 8mm cameras and as few 16mm as I could get away with. lol
So there is no obvious retainer ring on back of the front of the camera? Mayby the lens comeas apart to expose mounting screws in the rear section. I don't know.
Good luck
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#10 Mitch Perkins

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Posted 12 September 2007 - 10:13 PM

The front shell clearly pulls out frontwards which requires that the Lens be removed first.


Maybe not. Is there a rubber lens barrel grip "ring"? Get something under there, slide it off, maybe revealing screws. You may only have to remove the lens barrel cover and zoom ring + lever, allowing more clearance.

All S8 lenses I've seen mount with screws pointing forward, usually through a metal plate, threaded directly into main aluminum cylinder, through/in/around which all components move. This makes sense but can be extremely problematic for lens removal. ~:?)

You could be looking at major dis-assembly, including soldering little tiny wires. You may know when you get the front shell off.

HTH

Mitch
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#11 Terry Mester

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Posted 13 September 2007 - 05:23 PM

The Lens Dials / outer case does have extremely tiny flathead Screws (about 1mm) holding it on. There could easily be mounting screws beneath the outer case. I don't have a screwdriver that small, and so I'll have to get one. I'll post pictures when I do. I was looking up the Canon on Super8wiki. WOE!!! :blink: I would not want to disassemble one of those! Although my Argus has some plastic Gears, it certainly is easy to disassemble.
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#12 John Sprung

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Posted 13 September 2007 - 07:40 PM

I serviced, repaired and built motion picture cameras and lenses for thirty years and never once ran into a left hand thread.

Left hand threads are used in basically three situations:

1. Places where there's a lot of RPM's and/or torque, and the LH direction acts to tighten rather than loosen. F'rinstance the blade nut on a Unisaw, some left wheel bearings on cars, etc.

2. Places where a left and a right hand thread on the same part is used to adjust length, like turnbuckles.

3. Places where you really should turn something the opposite way to how you'd guess. The insert retaining screws on Switchcraft XLR's are the only example I know of that.

I found a turnbuckle type adjustment on an old gear head once, but no LH on any camera stuff so far....



-- J.S.
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#13 Mitch Perkins

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Posted 13 September 2007 - 10:14 PM

The Lens Dials / outer case does have extremely tiny flathead Screws (about 1mm) holding it on. There could easily be mounting screws beneath the outer case.


Mounting screws for the lens, probably not, but you should be able to get the front of the camera off with the added clearance provided by removing the zoom/focus ring covers. Then you can investigate removing the front assembly. It'll have to come off so you can access the lens mounting screws from "behind".

Mitch
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#14 Giles Perkins

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Posted 14 September 2007 - 05:21 PM

Have just disassembled a dead Chinon for an article I saw...

Screws hidden under sticky decorative pads - myriad's of internal screws holding circuit boards etc - screws which had been sealed with that tamperproof material. Some of the main screws such as to take the lens off were very tight - tip here - a light tap on the end of the screwdriver (I used jewelers screwdrivers) with a small hammer before attempting to free a tight screw usually does the trick!
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#15 David W Scott

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Posted 15 September 2007 - 09:15 AM

Mitch, how tough is it to get into the front of the lens assembly on a Nikon Super Zoom?

I inherited a camera that needs some cleaning out...

Good thing for your body disassembly guide on the Wiki.

Dave
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#16 Mitch Perkins

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Posted 16 September 2007 - 07:56 PM

Mitch, how tough is it to get into the front of the lens assembly on a Nikon Super Zoom?

I inherited a camera that needs some cleaning out...

Good thing for your body disassembly guide on the Wiki.

Dave


Not too tough. Focus and zoom ring covers have to come off, then front cover...

It's a lot easier if you decide to forgo power zoom and AE; you can snip those wires and get to work.

Mitch
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