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#1 Cathy Rasmussen

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Posted 13 September 2007 - 12:43 AM

Hi,

I am new to filmmaking and have a few questions about cameras. I want to get a Canon GL2. My first question is since it is a mini dv how do I get the finished product onto my computer to edit it? Do I need special equipment to do the editing? About how much do those tapes cost? and are they reusable?

Could you also recommend some other cameras which are pretty good. I am planning on spending $2,000-$3,000. I would like input from others before I make my final decsion. I am researching now.


I have a jvc hard disk consumer camcorder now that I just plug in the usb. This is an ok camera to work with but I do want to do professional quality films.

Thank you

Cathy
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#2 Dory Breaux DP

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Posted 13 September 2007 - 12:49 PM

Kathy- welcome to the world of Digetal Video production! The GL2 is a good camera, I use one a good deal. THey arnt the most robust thing in the world, but they have a good quality picture and some nice features. As far as special editing equipment, the only things you need are a firewire port on your mac or pc, a firewire cable and some editing software. If your looking for something in that budget area tho, you might want to look at the panasonic dvx100b from B&H. they havea pretty good deal on it. I'm planning on getting one myself in a few weeks.

Hope that helpped and once again welcome!

Dory
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#3 Logan Schneider

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Posted 13 September 2007 - 01:12 PM

I would definitely recommend the DVX-100 over a GL-2. You should be able to buy one and have a little money left to spare for a tripod. As for editing, both cameras will connect to your computer via firewire cable, which is how you get the footage off of the tape. The tapes are reusable, though it is not recommended. If you buy a bunch of them they are only about $5 each. Your computer should have some basic editing software built in. Good luck.
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#4 Cathy Rasmussen

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Posted 13 September 2007 - 11:09 PM

I would definitely recommend the DVX-100 over a GL-2. You should be able to buy one and have a little money left to spare for a tripod. As for editing, both cameras will connect to your computer via firewire cable, which is how you get the footage off of the tape. The tapes are reusable, though it is not recommended. If you buy a bunch of them they are only about $5 each. Your computer should have some basic editing software built in. Good luck.



Thank you both for your replies.

Today I went a bought two books. The first from the list on this website. Cinematography by Kris Malkiewicz. And the second called Digital Filmmaking 101 second edition.

I have some editing software. I have been using Pinnacle Studio which I like and I also have Sony Vegas Movie Studio Platnium, which I have not really used much yet.

Thanks again

Cathy
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#5 David Auner aac

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Posted 14 September 2007 - 03:34 AM

Today I went a bought two books. The first from the list on this website. Cinematography by Kris Malkiewicz. And the second called Digital Filmmaking 101 second edition.

I have some editing software. I have been using Pinnacle Studio which I like and I also have Sony Vegas Movie Studio Platnium, which I have not really used much yet.


Hi Cathy,

I can thoroughly recommend the Malkiewicz book, co-authored by our resident ASC David M. Mullen. Can't say anything about the second book. Check out the boards list of book to read. There's a good number cool books there.

As for editing software it might be a good idea to look into what kind of software is used professionally in your area. The real art of editing is something different than knowing your software, but it sure is nice to be able to work as editing assistant to pay bills while you're learning.

I cut my stuff on Avid and by knowing that software & a number of people knowing I did, was asked to jump in for sick people a couple of times for good pay. IIRC you can get the lightest Avid Xpress package for around 400 EU nowadays... and I seem to remember that there was a free edition too!

Cheers, Dave
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#6 Cathy Rasmussen

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Posted 14 September 2007 - 04:56 PM

Hi Cathy,

I can thoroughly recommend the Malkiewicz book, co-authored by our resident ASC David M. Mullen. Can't say anything about the second book. Check out the boards list of book to read. There's a good number cool books there.

As for editing software it might be a good idea to look into what kind of software is used professionally in your area. The real art of editing is something different than knowing your software, but it sure is nice to be able to work as editing assistant to pay bills while you're learning.

I cut my stuff on Avid and by knowing that software & a number of people knowing I did, was asked to jump in for sick people a couple of times for good pay. IIRC you can get the lightest Avid Xpress package for around 400 EU nowadays... and I seem to remember that there was a free edition too!

Cheers, Dave


Hi David,

Thanks for your input it's very helpful. I actually downloaded the free version of Avid. I haven't installed it yet but i guess they are discontinuing the free version but at least I can try it out. I have checked the list and made a lsit of both the movies and books listed. I'll slowly try to buy a few more books so I don't over extend my $$$ :-)

Cathy
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#7 Logan Schneider

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Posted 14 September 2007 - 05:03 PM

Check you local library. They sometimes have random film books.
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#8 Cathy Rasmussen

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Posted 17 September 2007 - 05:39 PM

I have some questions about cameras in general. The first is about ccd. I have noticed differnt cameras have different sizes such as 1/4" and 1/3" is that going to make much of a difference? What is the difference between CMOS and CCD please explain in easy to understand terms.

Should I be buying a high def camera? Does high def make that much difference? Do most cameras have interchangables lenses like on a slr camera?

Thanks again for helping me since I am new to this and really want to be informed before I drop that big of a chunk of $$ on a camera.

I really want to make documentaries more than feature films.


Cathy
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#9 Alberto Fernandez

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Posted 05 October 2007 - 03:06 AM

I know nothing about it but I was wondering about that the other day, here is the easy source:

Wiki source

and the more complicated source:

Dalsa source

Allegedly, ccd had more quality at the expense of more power and size, and CMOS could have more functions in the chip with less power and size. But apparently thats not necessarily the case anymore. I think if you get a CCD camera you will get a more analog feel, and a more vivid and HD feel with a CMOS chip. Im sure someone will correct me if im misleading you... :D

I know even less about HD and SD, but my guess is it depends on your target audience too. Both choices can be seen in a large 16:9 TV and few people would know the difference. There is a show on MTV called "the hills", its shot on SD and the whole production looks awesome in my opinion, i thought it was HD for sure, which got me thinking HD is not a requisite for awesomeness (well, a panasonic SDX900 helps, along with a top colorist with a gazillion dollar color software). On the other hand, if you have the proper tools to handle and produce HD without losing definition in the process then go for it, that means the camera that can fully capture it (that means 3 chips on the camera), the right format to transfer (check the native format of the camera), the editing software that can handle it (final cut, premiere pro or cs3, avid, vegas 7, etc), and produce it (blueray or HD DVD).

Ive never touched a decent camera in my life, but hey, i guess im learing something here.. hah. Someone will correct my mistakes i assume.

Good luck.

Edited by Alberto Fernandez, 05 October 2007 - 03:08 AM.

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#10 Simon Miya

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Posted 05 October 2007 - 03:19 AM

I think if you get a CCD camera you will get a more analog feel, and a more vivid and HD feel with a CMOS chip. Im sure someone will correct me if im misleading you...


I'm sorry, I have to correct you. I don't think anyone would be able to tell the difference between the two types of sensor based on final output, all other factors being equal.

All other factors are NEVER equal, however.

Edited by Simon Miya, 05 October 2007 - 03:23 AM.

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#11 Alberto Fernandez

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Posted 05 October 2007 - 03:35 AM

Yup, i probably got that from reading how the two different systems used to work some time ago, and is not valid anymore, Simon.

Here is another thread that can help you understand the SD and HD differences, Cathy.

SD or HD thread
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