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Cross-Processing old kodachrome stock as b/w


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#1 Marc Roessler

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Posted 13 September 2007 - 12:17 PM

Hi again..

I'd like to try to cross-process some old (exposed > 15 years ago) kodachrome stock
as b/w. The idea is that b/w processing probably will yield the most satisfying results with
stock exposed that long ago. Also it can be done manually, so the process can be controlled
better (short test strips developed etc).

Some questions:
- how likely is it to get an (even faint) image out of that roll of film?
- for getting the best results (high contrast, deep blacks, low grain) our of that expired film,
would I need to push or pull the film? Or does it only make things worse?

Greetings,
Marc
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#2 K Borowski

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Posted 13 September 2007 - 02:04 PM

If this film is important, don't do it yourself. I have a good friend that does it out of Plattsburgh, NY who has devised the optimal formula for what you're trying to do. Do an internet search Martin Baumgarten or Plattsburgh Photographic services, or look for the Super 8mm Metadirectory and there are formulae of his derivation on the net for doing this sort of thing, along with detailed processing instructions. If it is over your head or you can't find this stuff with a search, you can email him at Super8mm [at] aol [dot] com . Use normal email format; I wrote it like that so spambots won't find him.

Regards,

~Karl Borowski

Post Script: If you've had this film in an attic for 15 yrs. put it in a double layer of plastic bags and put it in a freezer NOW to minimize any further latent image fading of the image. It'll need about a two hour thaw out of hte freezer, but that should minimize any further fading damage.
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#3 Matthew Buick

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Posted 14 September 2007 - 02:54 PM

If this is Kodachrome surely a K14 process minus the dyeing stages would yield a B&W positive?

Maybe Dwayne's would offer this service, they are a small business offering a niche service.
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#4 K Borowski

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Posted 14 September 2007 - 07:29 PM

Matthew, you can do it either as a negative or positive. Due to degradation, the simplest (and therefore least prone to error) route is to develop the film to a negative and then telecine the film and reverse it in post. Reversal development involves a clearing bath, silver bleach, and then a redevelopment of the remaining silver halides, with a final optional fix. The procedure is ultimately more tedious and time consuming, as the film is probably in no shape to be projected after such protracted periods of latent image fading. I have actually had a roll of K40A developed that I found in a camera I bought for kicks in a thrift store one summer, and the severe magenta shift made the footage almost unwatchable in parts.

~KB
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#5 Matthew Buick

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Posted 15 September 2007 - 03:12 AM

Oh well. Thanks anyways. :)
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#6 Marc Roessler

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Posted 15 September 2007 - 07:07 AM

Hi all,
thanks for your replies!
The film is not important... i found it in an old camera, and it would be a pity not to develop it. So i decided
to give it a try, but I won't invest a lot of money. If it doesn't work, well at least I tried.
Greetings,
Marc
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