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Racking focus without camera shake tips?


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#1 Layi Babalola

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Posted 14 September 2007 - 10:35 PM

Hello all. I was wondering if you had any tips regarding minimizing camera shake while racking focus? Looking to improve my footage. Had the camera, rods, M2 35mm adapter and lens on bogen sticks w/ a 503 head. The tripod was on a skater dolly and we were pushing into our subject while racking focus. Found it very hard to get a smooth, locked off shot.

Any ideas on how to clean up our camera work? Do we need to move the rails back a bit so that the adaper is more adjacent to the tripod head?

Thanks!
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#2 Michael Nash

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Posted 15 September 2007 - 03:13 AM

You simply need a more sturdy head and legs. Try something like an OConnor 1030 head or better yet a 2575 head, or a Sachtler equivalent -- and sturdy enough legs to go with it (100mm bowl or larger or a Mitchell base). Steady shots come from steady support. Flimsy support gives shaky shots.
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#3 Layi Babalola

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Posted 15 September 2007 - 09:33 AM

I would think the bogen legs with the 503 head would be sturdy enough for this camera system. Am I wrong?

Thanks
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#4 Stephen Williams

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Posted 15 September 2007 - 09:56 AM

I would think the bogen legs with the 503 head would be sturdy enough for this camera system. Am I wrong?

Thanks


Hi,

If it's shaking you have probably answered your own question.

Stephen
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#5 Michael Nash

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Posted 15 September 2007 - 03:51 PM

I would think the bogen legs with the 503 head would be sturdy enough for this camera system. Am I wrong?

Thanks


Stephen's right. You're probably pushing the weight capacity of the tripod and head with the camera setup you have. Re-distributing the weight up top isn't going to do much if it's straining the support to begin with.
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#6 Paul Nordin

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Posted 15 September 2007 - 04:25 PM

Stephen's right. You're probably pushing the weight capacity of the tripod and head with the camera setup you have. Re-distributing the weight up top isn't going to do much if it's straining the support to begin with.


If you are not able to foot the bill for a pro-quality tripod such as those Nash is recommending, you can work through the chain of support to try to eliminate the wobbles one joint at a time. I would start by sand-bagging the tripod legs solidly to the ground. Then work your way up doing what you can to eliminate any unwanted motion when you are applying the rotational torque from racking. Obvious places to put attention on will also include: Tripod Plate to camera, camera to rails, rails to ff, ff to lens. If you don't have a lens support on the rails, you will be fighting a loosing battle.
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