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Overexposing/Pulling 7266


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#1 Markus Lanxinger

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Posted 18 September 2007 - 09:09 PM

Hey guys,

I am planning on shooting some 7266. Can I reduce some of the grain if I overexpose it and then pull it back down during processing? This is going to be shot on regular 16mm.

I was also wondering what kind of latitude this particular filmstock has. How does it handle shadows and highlights. How much can I go over and under?

thanks in advance.

cheers
markus
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#2 K Borowski

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Posted 21 September 2007 - 01:13 PM

Yes, about 1/2 stop of overexposure will save you grain. I wouldn't worry about pulling if I were you. It's more costly and has negligeable benefits. You really don't have the same control over film in cinematography as you do in still photography, since you don't have the ability to dodge and burn (except digitally, which isn't really as good), so pulling would only be useful in my case if I were to grossly overexpose footage mistakenly and wanted to minimize any halation or highlight blockup. My advice would be to shoot a few feet of tests.

Regards,

~KB
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#3 Markus Lanxinger

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Posted 05 October 2007 - 12:05 PM

Yes, about 1/2 stop of overexposure will save you grain. I wouldn't worry about pulling if I were you. It's more costly and has negligeable benefits. You really don't have the same control over film in cinematography as you do in still photography, since you don't have the ability to dodge and burn (except digitally, which isn't really as good), so pulling would only be useful in my case if I were to grossly overexpose footage mistakenly and wanted to minimize any halation or highlight blockup. My advice would be to shoot a few feet of tests.

Regards,

~KB


thanks for your advice. so what is the latitude that I have with that particular film stock. How far can I go over and under. As I understand it's pretty much only 1, 2 stops in each direction if I remember it right. I've only shot this stock once and it's been a while. Will there be anything 2 stops under pure black and 2 stops over pure white?

thanks
markus

Edited by Markus Lanxinger, 05 October 2007 - 12:05 PM.

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#4 Jon Coy

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Posted 16 October 2011 - 07:11 PM

thanks for your advice. so what is the latitude that I have with that particular film stock. How far can I go over and under. As I understand it's pretty much only 1, 2 stops in each direction if I remember it right. I've only shot this stock once and it's been a while. Will there be anything 2 stops under pure black and 2 stops over pure white?

thanks
markus


Markus,

I've been shooting a lot of 7266 lately, and as far as I and the director of my program (MFA at Ohio University) can tell, the 7266 will give you good details about a stop to a stop and two thirds UNDER (we've noticed that after two stops under, it goes black pretty quickly), and it will keep overexposed details as high as three stops over. However, that three-stop limit seems to be a fairly hard limit. Basically, it's a very rich 16mm stock that handles highlights beautifully but can be a little unforgiving under dark conditions.

Hope this helps!

Jon

PS I just noticed this discussion is quite old. Sorry!

Edited by Jon Coy, 16 October 2011 - 07:16 PM.

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