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How did they do this?


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#1 Ashley Barron

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Posted 20 September 2007 - 07:35 AM

Hello,
I am to shoot a tree this weekend, and it needs to look something like this (well I would like it to look something like this anyway).
I am working on a Sony DSR 500, which means that exteriors have the potential to burn out etc.
I was wondering, in your wise opinions, how do you think the warmth and beauty of this scene was achieved - the time of day? filters on the camera? was the color manipulated in post?

http://www.brightcov...annel=376816769
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#2 Ashley Barron

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Posted 20 September 2007 - 07:42 AM

In fact..does anyone have any tips as to how to make exteriors look good on digital? Bear in mind that the main sources of light are the sun and some reflector boards..is this more of a question of saturation of colors in post or are there in-camera techniques to be used, such as white balancing for a warmer feel or..?
I have just heard that exteriors on digital can be a little difficult and sometimes unattractive, so anyone that has could you put forth some words of wisdom?
Thanking you all,
Ashley.
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#3 Brian Dzyak

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Posted 20 September 2007 - 08:04 AM

Digital/video gets such a bad reputation, but bear in mind that those who have a difficult time with it usually have grown up shooting only film and aren't interested in learning the parameters of an electronic acquisition tool. There's no reason that digital/video can't look fantastic so long as you know the machine and shoot within its limits.

With that in mind, yes, one thing you can do is to "trick" the white balance to warm the image in camera. You might also try shooting at different frame rates if that is available to you as well as experiment with the shutter. Test different filters in front of the lens, like an 812 warming filter or a 1/4 Black Pro Mist. I tend to go light on the filters just to take some of the edge off. Also try to avoid shooting at very high contrast times of day, aiming instead for early morning or late afternoon. Just the same, avoid shooting after the sun is completely gone as everything turns muddy very quickly.
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#4 Ashley Barron

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Posted 20 September 2007 - 08:09 AM

[quote name='Brian Dzyak' date='Sep 20 2007, 09:04 PM' post='194627']
You might also try shooting at different frame rates if that is available to you as well as experiment with the shutter.

I don't think I can do much with the frame rates in the DSR but what would you suggest for the shutter?
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