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#1 Chris Walters

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Posted 23 September 2007 - 07:11 PM

I'm trying to figure out a dolly or crane rig that can go on rough terrain and be relatively smooth. Were shooting people on horses sometimes just walking and talking, but other times it is a full gallop. What kind of rig do I need to follow that kind of fast moving action smoothly. If anyone can point me in the right direction or have used or heard of such dollys or cranes please let me know. Thank you

Chris Waltes
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#2 d humber

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Posted 23 September 2007 - 08:46 PM

you don't say what your budget is, so it's hard to know what to reccomend. For rough terrain, Chapman has a vehicle called a Raptor that is basically a gator with a crane mounted on it. That in conjunction with a gyroscopic head would work (try the Lev head). or a steadicam operator on a 4-wheeler.
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#3 Chris Walters

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Posted 23 September 2007 - 09:50 PM

you don't say what your budget is, so it's hard to know what to reccomend. For rough terrain, Chapman has a vehicle called a Raptor that is basically a gator with a crane mounted on it. That in conjunction with a gyroscopic head would work (try the Lev head). or a steadicam operator on a 4-wheeler.


Thank you for the advice. In terms of the budget its secondary to finding ideas for how to accomplish the shots then we will narrow down what we want to what we can actually do financially and logistically. But I will look into your suggestions thank you again..


Chris
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#4 Bob Hayes

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Posted 23 September 2007 - 10:23 PM

A trick I have often used is to find a smooth section of high way next to the rough terrain you want to film. Then just shoot off of the road. It works great.

If you must shoot of the road you might want to check out the heavy duty off road vehicles that compete in some of the competitive desert races. Some of these have 36? shock absorbers. I have hit 1 foot high ridges at 45 miles per and not felt any roughness.
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#5 Michael Nash

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Posted 24 September 2007 - 01:30 AM

The simplest thing is to break down your script to the scenes that really need those moves, and then figure the best approach for each of those shots. For one location shooting from a road might work; for another shot a big crane might be more appropriate. Don't expect a one-rig-fits-all solution.
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#6 Jess Haas

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Posted 13 November 2007 - 09:55 PM

Chapman's gyro stabilized heads are awesome and a definite option. A Steadicam operator on a vehicle or on a horse with a saddle mount would also be an excellent option. The later will work much better in smaller spaces, the former will work well when you have the space for a vehicle and jib arm.

~Jess
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#7 Peter Hoare

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Posted 14 November 2007 - 08:04 AM

Like this?

http://uk.youtube.co...h?v=wN03uIRmYnc

Stabshot seem so specialise in stuff like that. They use a gyro stabalised head, and in that video, it looks like a large motorbike shock or something built into the cameras support. A steadicam operator on the back of a flatbed truck would probably be the quickest way?

Thanks.
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#8 Chris Walters

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Posted 11 December 2007 - 07:21 PM

The steady cam is looking like a good idea... but I've been doing searches online and nothing has shown up to where I can rent the A3 rig or any other steadycam body suit.. can anyone recommend a place in LA. Thank you for the advice

Chris
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#9 Chris Keth

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Posted 11 December 2007 - 07:27 PM

The steady cam is looking like a good idea... but I've been doing searches online and nothing has shown up to where I can rent the A3 rig or any other steadycam body suit.. can anyone recommend a place in LA. Thank you for the advice

Chris


Steadicams generally aren't rented. They're usually hired along with the steadicam op that owns it.
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#10 Brad Grimmett

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Posted 11 December 2007 - 08:32 PM

A Steadicam operator on a vehicle or on a horse with a saddle mount would also be an excellent option.

~Jess

No, it actually wouldn't. Those saddle mounts were made for walking, no more. You'll injure your operator, your horse, or both if you try to run with a steadicam mounted to the saddle.
Be careful recommending stuff Jess if you're not sure what you're talking about.
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#11 Brad Grimmett

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Posted 11 December 2007 - 08:40 PM

The steady cam is looking like a good idea... but I've been doing searches online and nothing has shown up to where I can rent the A3 rig or any other steadycam body suit.. can anyone recommend a place in LA. Thank you for the advice

Chris

I could give you names of places you could rent a rig, but it doesn't appear that you know much about steadicam, which is a bit scary with these types of shots. If it was just a walk and talk down the sidewalk I'd throw you some #'s in a heartbeat, but not in this case. You're better off hiring an operator and rig. I'll be happy to help you find someone if you need. Anything high speed with steadicam can be dangerous. If you mis-handle the rig and blow a spring a crew member or horse could get killed or maimed, or at the very least you could do $50,000 or $60,000 worth of damage to the gear, or much more.
There is a reason people train to learn specialties. They may make the shots look easy, but most of the time there is a lot of skill involved that you're not seeing.
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#12 Chris Walters

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Posted 17 December 2007 - 11:29 AM

I could give you names of places you could rent a rig, but it doesn't appear that you know much about steadicam, which is a bit scary with these types of shots. If it was just a walk and talk down the sidewalk I'd throw you some #'s in a heartbeat, but not in this case. You're better off hiring an operator and rig. I'll be happy to help you find someone if you need. Anything high speed with steadicam can be dangerous. If you mis-handle the rig and blow a spring a crew member or horse could get killed or maimed, or at the very least you could do $50,000 or $60,000 worth of damage to the gear, or much more.
There is a reason people train to learn specialties. They may make the shots look easy, but most of the time there is a lot of skill involved that you're not seeing.


For these types of shots I completely agree with you, but for walk and talk stuff I would like to operate it. Where does one get trained in steadycam operating. Is it just something you have to purchase and train your self?
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#13 Jess Haas

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Posted 17 December 2007 - 03:52 PM

Most people who are serious about steadicam take a workshop:
http://thesteadicamworkshops.com/
http://www.steadicam-ops.com/

~Jess
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#14 Brad Grimmett

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Posted 18 December 2007 - 04:25 AM

For these types of shots I completely agree with you, but for walk and talk stuff I would like to operate it.

That's fine, but I'll bet you'll be surprised at how bad your shots are. I don't mean you specifically, but anyone trying steadicam for the first time will not have good results. Sure, some are better than others at first, but it takes a while just to get used to the physicality of it as well as the different way that the device is operated. I cringe when I see some of the stuff that I shot when I was first starting out, as everyone does.

Where does one get trained in steadycam operating. Is it just something you have to purchase and train your self?

The vast majority of people take a workshop. It's money well spent and can help to keep you from forming bad habits right off the bat. Most people take a workshop before they buy a rig to find out if they're cut out for it and if they like it. It's tough to make such a large investment without even knowing if it's something you're good at. After the workshop, most people spend about a year or two practicing a lot and doing student and short films. It's a good way to learn under the least amount of pressure as well as give you some footage for a reel.
Some people think that they can just buy a rig and be working right away. That's not the case and for most people it takes at least 3 or 4 years before they're getting enough work to make a living.
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#15 Chris Walters

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Posted 20 December 2007 - 05:48 PM

That's fine, but I'll bet you'll be surprised at how bad your shots are. I don't mean you specifically, but anyone trying steadicam for the first time will not have good results. Sure, some are better than others at first, but it takes a while just to get used to the physicality of it as well as the different way that the device is operated. I cringe when I see some of the stuff that I shot when I was first starting out, as everyone does.

The vast majority of people take a workshop. It's money well spent and can help to keep you from forming bad habits right off the bat. Most people take a workshop before they buy a rig to find out if they're cut out for it and if they like it. It's tough to make such a large investment without even knowing if it's something you're good at. After the workshop, most people spend about a year or two practicing a lot and doing student and short films. It's a good way to learn under the least amount of pressure as well as give you some footage for a reel.
Some people think that they can just buy a rig and be working right away. That's not the case and for most people it takes at least 3 or 4 years before they're getting enough work to make a living.

Hey Brad thank you for all the great adivce.. you really got me interested in the workshops. See if i don't stumble lol. I saw your reel and really liked it. Its operators like you who make a youngster like me think its easy. I will look into the workshops and most likely hire out. Again thank you for the advice. I assume you are in the LA area is it possible you could send me a quote of you're rate with the rig. Thank you

Chris
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