Jump to content


Photo

Yoga Video?


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 Dyaln Funk

Dyaln Funk

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts
  • Other

Posted 23 September 2007 - 10:47 PM

I am a former marketing manager turned yoga instructor. My dream is to eventually earn a livable wage teaching yoga, so I am planning to produce a series of four yoga videos. I have a geat deal of experience in web, branding and online marketing, however this will be my first film project. My budget is quite small, as I'm now earning a yoga instructors wage which is, well....not alot.

I am planning to post wanted ads on Mandy, Craiglist and Here. But before I do I would like some feedback/advice from you guys.

I spoke to one guy in miami who quoted me 8K per video. Ouch! I felt that was way too much.
I spoke to another guy who quoted me 1K per video - much more affordable. His reel looks a bit to film schooly - not really any strong experience.

From my research I think that I should be able to get:

Equipment (two High Def cameras, lighting, jib, dollly, grip, mics) - 1K per day
Highly Experienced Cameraman (DP?)- $500 per day (2 days)
Assistant Cameraman (AC?)- $250 per day (2 days)
Post Production Editing and DVD Authoring - $1200-2400
Studio - $250 to $1000 per day depending on location and quality of studio (2 days)

Total Budget = 6-7K

I want to produce four videos - each containing 1-60minute and 1-30minute yoga sequence (just me - no students in video). Each video will also include a five minute intro/interview where I talk to the folks. Want simple set, dramatic lighting.

I think that it would probably take 2 days of filming. I teach 20 hours a week and am comfortable on camera, so I'm well practiced and do not antcipate the need for lots of shoot time/retakes. There will be a need for some post production editing because they will need to cut in different shots/angles.

I prefer to shoot in Florida. But can go to another city if it means I can get awesome work at an affordable rate. Which cities do you think have the most competitive talent pools?

What do you think? Is this a good budget? too much? too little? Am I missing anything?

How might I word the ad so that I manage my expectations, as well as the expecations of the folks I would hire.

Thank you for taking the time to read this,

Namaste
DWF

Edited by Dyaln Funk, 23 September 2007 - 10:52 PM.

  • 0

#2 Michael Nash

Michael Nash
  • Sustaining Members
  • 3330 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Pasadena, CA

Posted 24 September 2007 - 12:12 AM

Picking a producer is a bit like picking a contractor; you kinda get what you pay for. An experienced, quality producer will turn out a hassle-free, high quality product but at a price. Producers who come back with the lowest bids may not have the chops or equipment to pull off a quality product (which in turn makes you look bad), and there can be unexpected snags along the way (bad gear or crew, delays, etc).

The budget may break down differently between bidders, but eventually it's going to come down to that place where what you can afford, and what producers are willing to work for, meet. If $6-7K is your budget then that's what you have to shop around. It may mean changing your idea around a bit to fit the budget, and some dealing on the part of the producers.

In general though I think your equipment budget is too low. You can get a basic package for that price, but expecting a production-quality dolly, jib, audio, and "dramatic lighting" isn't likely to happen at that price. If your end product is on DVD you don't necessarily need to shoot HD either; standard def broadcast cameras are another option if someone happens to offer you a good package deal. On cost alone though, HD or SD doesn't make as much difference.

Your crew rates seem okay for the type of production, but I'd expect a 3 or four man crew, depending on the setup (director/cameraman, sound, lighting and grip). Rates are something highly negotiable, so I'm hesitant to float a figure out there for you.

Post and DVD authoring can also vary widely, depending on what gear the producer has access to. Established producers with paid-off in-house gear are in a position to cut you a better deal and deliver proven quality, vs. the guy who has to cover his own expenses by sub-renting time and dealing with workflow issues at a facility other than his own. Don't forget artwork and packaging.

Locations can also vary wildly in price, depending on what you can get access to. You might consider a practical location for a few hours a day rather than a studio, depending on the "look" you want for your videos.

Also five minutes is a LONG time to watch someone talk on video, unless what you have to say really takes 5 minutes to get across. Two minutes of introduction is more reasonable. I used to do corporate video and clients would come in saying they wanted a 15 minute video, not realizing how quickly you can get ideas across on video (think of your average 30 second commercial). A majority of the projects actually came in between 7-8 minutes. But for the instruction portion of the video, I understand that the 30 and 60 minute sessions have to take place in real time to be effective.

The bigger the market (city), the more competition there will be among producers. But you shouldn't have too hard a time finding someone in Florida (I did exactly that type of stuff for 10 years in the Tampa area).
  • 0

#3 Dyaln Funk

Dyaln Funk

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts
  • Other

Posted 24 September 2007 - 07:45 AM

Thank you Michael for taking the time to write a thorough and helpful reply.

I should add that in terms of audio, I will bring the stock music and voice over to the production. We will only need audio for the five minute intro. Yes, I agree five minutes is long. It's not actually an intro. There will be a one or two minute intro, plus a bonus feature interview.

Packaging and desgin I will do - that is my profession :)


Oh - forgot to ask. What do you think is a more realistic budget for lighting and equipment?

The reason I want to do it in a 'studio' is because we can control lighting and elements. I thought that it cost MORE to produce a video outside. Is that inaccurate?

Edited by Dyaln Funk, 24 September 2007 - 07:50 AM.

  • 0

#4 Michael Nash

Michael Nash
  • Sustaining Members
  • 3330 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Pasadena, CA

Posted 24 September 2007 - 05:37 PM

Like I said there are lots of variables. Sometimes creating a look from scratch can be more time-, labor-, and equipment-consuming than "tweaking" an already good-looking location (and by "location" I mean interiors also, like inside a mansion, loft, nice hotel, etc.). It just depends on what look you want, and what's at your disposal.

And it's hard to put together a realistic equipment budget without knowing how ALL the variables fall into play. To be safe on your estimate you could start by doubling that $1K figure, but it doesn't necessarily have to be that high.

I know it sounds like I'm being vague on the numbers, and I know you're just doing your homework before soliciting bids. But really, the best thing for you to do is start interviewing promising producers and discuss your project with them until you find a good match. Inevitably your initial ideas and their bids will evolve when you sit down and discuss the project. A good producer is one who'll take that time with you to make the project work, rather than just spit back a figure.
  • 0

#5 Douglas Sunlin

Douglas Sunlin
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 70 posts
  • Student

Posted 25 September 2007 - 11:31 AM

The learning curve isn't commonly figured into the budget, but it looks like that guy in Florida may have given you a good number, based on his experience.
  • 0


Technodolly

Tai Audio

Glidecam

Aerial Filmworks

rebotnix Technologies

Rig Wheels Passport

The Slider

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Abel Cine

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Metropolis Post

Wooden Camera

Willys Widgets

Paralinx LLC

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

FJS International, LLC

Opal

Ritter Battery

Visual Products

CineTape

CineLab

Technodolly

Abel Cine

Paralinx LLC

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

The Slider

Willys Widgets

rebotnix Technologies

FJS International, LLC

CineTape

Glidecam

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Tai Audio

Visual Products

Opal

CineLab

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Ritter Battery

Metropolis Post

Rig Wheels Passport

Wooden Camera

Aerial Filmworks