Jump to content


Photo

Different coloured gels


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 Ashley Barron

Ashley Barron
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 115 posts
  • Student

Posted 25 September 2007 - 10:58 PM

Hello,
Has anyone worked with coloured gels like Lavender and Royal Blue in night scenes before? I want to add a hint of color to a scene and give it more of a signature so that in other scenes similar they have that connection. We also want to bring color to the scene as a symbolic meaning and I was wondering if we can do that with colored gels?
Anyone have any experiences?
  • 0

#2 David Mullen ASC

David Mullen ASC
  • Sustaining Members
  • 19765 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 25 September 2007 - 11:19 PM

Obviously colors can be symbolic, but the best thing is when they also are simultaneously logically motivated -- for example, a certain theme may use orange light for warmth, so if those scenes are set during sunset or by candlelight, the viewer isn't going to be wondering where the orange light is coming from.

It gets harder with "off" colors that are not as commonplace in real life -- green light, for example, tends to only come from certain neons and fluorescents.

As for moonlight being lavender or royal blue (not sure what color that is), that can be done if you want, as long as you don't change your mind in post because shifting the color around will affect anything lit with white light in the scene. I haven't done much for moonlight other than shades of pale blue; on my last film, I used Cyan gel but that was more for a mercury-vapor streetlamp effect.
  • 0

#3 Michael Nash

Michael Nash
  • Sustaining Members
  • 3330 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Pasadena, CA

Posted 25 September 2007 - 11:56 PM

If you're shooting on video you'll run into trouble getting purples and lavenders to render correctly. 3-chip video cameras are essentially "blind" to purple and will turn it blue, even when all other colors are correct.
  • 0

#4 Jonathan Bowerbank

Jonathan Bowerbank
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2815 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • San Francisco, CA

Posted 26 September 2007 - 01:21 AM

I admire Christopher Doyle's use of color in all his lighting. With urban lighting being his most common motivation, he always seems to capture it just right.

I'd recommend seeing any of his Wong Kar Wai films and just make a note what type of color palette he uses for certain scenes and situations.

Storaro is less subtle with his colorful lighting. But even so, it's as if it always suits the film and motivates the story. If you read any of his interviews, you'll get a healthy dose of his interpretation and relationship with color.

Referring to some of David's work, you should check out "Jackpot" where there are a lot of bar scenes with some great use of color, motivated by the bar/club atmosphere.
  • 0

#5 Ashley Barron

Ashley Barron
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 115 posts
  • Student

Posted 26 September 2007 - 01:27 AM

Thank you all very much, you've been a great help!
Ashley.
  • 0

#6 Dan Salzmann

Dan Salzmann
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1143 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Paris, France

Posted 26 September 2007 - 06:29 AM

It all depends on so many things. Motivated scenes can be more complex than "here we have candle light let's get some CTO and/or ambers on the lights. Chris Doyle is working a lot in Hong Kong where there are many mixed sources everywhere so often his lighting is a hodge podge of different colours. I just finished shooting a piece where the ambient fill had 219 fluorescent on the fixtures mixed with candle practicals.
Will try to get some frame grabs up when we do the grade.
  • 0

#7 David Mullen ASC

David Mullen ASC
  • Sustaining Members
  • 19765 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 26 September 2007 - 10:13 AM

Yes, in an urban environment at night, you have more justification for odd-colored lights -- even more so if the movie is set in Las Vegas or Tokyo, or any neon-saturated city or an area full of industrial lights.

It would be a bit harder in a farmhouse in the country to justify some colors for lights.

I still feel that in a scene lit with a strongly saturated color light, it's a good idea at some point to show or suggest what might be causing that color.
  • 0


Paralinx LLC

rebotnix Technologies

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

FJS International, LLC

Opal

CineTape

Glidecam

Abel Cine

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Ritter Battery

Metropolis Post

Rig Wheels Passport

Technodolly

Visual Products

The Slider

Willys Widgets

Wooden Camera

Broadcast Solutions Inc

CineLab

Tai Audio

Aerial Filmworks

CineLab

Glidecam

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

rebotnix Technologies

Willys Widgets

Wooden Camera

Ritter Battery

Aerial Filmworks

Rig Wheels Passport

Technodolly

Visual Products

The Slider

Paralinx LLC

Metropolis Post

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Tai Audio

CineTape

Broadcast Solutions Inc

FJS International, LLC

Opal

Abel Cine