Jump to content


Photo

Light/Flare Effect question


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 lmg

lmg

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 4 posts
  • Director

Posted 27 September 2007 - 02:50 PM

Hello everyone!

Ok, there?s this light effect that was used in Saving Private Ryan ? from 2h28min37sec to 2h28min49sec is the most noticeable - and in The Bourne Ultimatum ? during Bourne?s flashbacks - (and I?m sure in plenty of others more, but I can only recall these two now), where any bright white spots or surfaces, creates some sort of ?vertical white flare?. How can this be achieved? Using a special filter? What filter exactly?

Thanks a lot!

LMG
  • 0

#2 Michael Nash

Michael Nash
  • Sustaining Members
  • 3330 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Pasadena, CA

Posted 27 September 2007 - 04:03 PM

It's caused by throwing the camera's shutter out of phase with the film movement. The shutter is open briefly while the film is being advanced to the next frame. A few cameras have this available as a programming option; other cameras have to be mechanically modified to do it (which means it would do it ALL the time, until it's mechanically reset).

You could try using a Streak filter, but the effect doesn't look quite the same.
  • 0

#3 Rodrigo Prieto

Rodrigo Prieto
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 43 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 27 September 2007 - 06:51 PM

Luis,
Check out the Timing Shift Box from Arriflex. I tested it for my last film (Lust, Caution), but we did not use it in the end. It is an attachment to the camera that can alter the synchronisation or phase of the shutter and the movement, creating the streaking FX you describe. With the TSB you can adjust the strength of the effect, you can ramp it, adjust it manually, have it jitter, etc. You do not need to make any modifications to the camera while using the TSB. I think you can use it with the Arricams and the 435, but I don't know if other cameras are compatible. As always, if you can, shoot a test to familiarize yourself with the result on screen as you can't see the effect on camera or on the video assist.
Good luck!

Rodrigo.
  • 0

#4 Jon Kukla

Jon Kukla
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 399 posts
  • Other

Posted 27 September 2007 - 07:11 PM

Does the TSB have any markings or stops so that you know how much offset you're introducing? I was aware that tests need to be done to see how much of the effect you want, but how do you set it so as to maintain a consistent percentage of missync?
  • 0

#5 Rodrigo Prieto

Rodrigo Prieto
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 43 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 27 September 2007 - 07:34 PM

Does the TSB have any markings or stops so that you know how much offset you're introducing? I was aware that tests need to be done to see how much of the effect you want, but how do you set it so as to maintain a consistent percentage of missync?

You know Jon, I don't remember. I think you could put your own markings on the dial of the device... I do seem to recall that it was quite controllable and easy to use. I remember testing many different settings so there must be a way of knowing to what degree the effect is done.
RP.
  • 0

#6 Jon Kukla

Jon Kukla
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 399 posts
  • Other

Posted 27 September 2007 - 07:49 PM

Thanks, Rodrigo! I'll have to have a play with it next time I'm in the rental house... :)
  • 0

#7 lmg

lmg

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 4 posts
  • Director

Posted 28 September 2007 - 12:12 PM

Luis,
Check out the Timing Shift Box from Arriflex. I tested it for my last film (Lust, Caution), but we did not use it in the end. It is an attachment to the camera that can alter the synchronisation or phase of the shutter and the movement, creating the streaking FX you describe. With the TSB you can adjust the strength of the effect, you can ramp it, adjust it manually, have it jitter, etc. You do not need to make any modifications to the camera while using the TSB. I think you can use it with the Arricams and the 435, but I don't know if other cameras are compatible. As always, if you can, shoot a test to familiarize yourself with the result on screen as you can't see the effect on camera or on the video assist.
Good luck!

Rodrigo.


Gracias Rodrigo!
Naively, I thought this would be ?easier? to achieve. From what I?ve read about the TSB, it can only be used in 35mm cameras, and since the budget only allows me to use Super 16mm, I guess I?ll have to find another way around this or think of something different. Again, thanks a lot! Can?t wait to see ?Lust, Caution? - although I have no idea when it?ll be released here in Portugal. Your work is a constant inspiration... Best of luck to the rest of your career
  • 0

#8 lmg

lmg

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 4 posts
  • Director

Posted 28 September 2007 - 12:14 PM

It's caused by throwing the camera's shutter out of phase with the film movement. The shutter is open briefly while the film is being advanced to the next frame. A few cameras have this available as a programming option; other cameras have to be mechanically modified to do it (which means it would do it ALL the time, until it's mechanically reset).

You could try using a Streak filter, but the effect doesn't look quite the same.


Thank you very much, Michael!
  • 0


Visual Products

FJS International, LLC

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Aerial Filmworks

Opal

Metropolis Post

Tai Audio

Ritter Battery

Abel Cine

Wooden Camera

CineLab

rebotnix Technologies

Willys Widgets

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

The Slider

Glidecam

Paralinx LLC

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Rig Wheels Passport

CineTape

Technodolly

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Abel Cine

CineLab

Rig Wheels Passport

Paralinx LLC

Aerial Filmworks

Visual Products

Tai Audio

Wooden Camera

Metropolis Post

CineTape

rebotnix Technologies

The Slider

FJS International, LLC

Willys Widgets

Glidecam

Opal

Technodolly

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Ritter Battery