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#1 Joseph Nesbitt

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Posted 01 October 2007 - 04:03 PM

I have a few questions about super 8, and film as well, first can you re-record over film you shot like on a mini-dv or Vhs-c camcorder or do you have to keep buying film?
Next can you take the film you shot on the camera re-wind it and put that on a computer some how?
If so what device can do that
next what is a good cheap and reliable super 8 camera
and finally is e bay the right direction to go in if your looking to buy one?
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#2 Toby L Edwards

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Posted 01 October 2007 - 04:38 PM

I would recommend that you pick up a fully manual 35MM SLR camera on Ebay. search for "Minolta" you can usually find one for under $50.00 and start there. Still photography and Cinematography are very similar. It will be allot cheaper and faster to learn. Try to find a book on basic "Film" photography.
To answer your questions.
(1) FILM CAN ONLY BE USED ONCE.
(2) AFTER YOU SHOOT OR "EXPOSE" THE FILM YOU SEND IT TO A LAB FOR PROCESSING AND TRANSFER TO VIDEO. NOW IT CAN BE CAPTURED INTO YOUR COMPUTER.(IF YOU HAVE A COMPUTER THAT HAS THIS FEATURE.
(3) EBAY IS A GOOD PLACE TO LOOK FOR A CAMERA. YOU CAN ALSO BUY THEM FROM "SPECTRA FILM AND VIDEO" CHECK THERE WEB SITE. NOT ALL CAMERA'S CAN USE THE NEW FILM'S FROM KODAK AND OTHERS.
Hope this helps

Toby
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#3 Giles Perkins

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Posted 01 October 2007 - 04:40 PM

Joseph,

as a start see http://homepage.mac....uper8/faqs.html then have a root around the remainder of http://homepage.mac.com/onsuper8/ that should get you most of the way down the road then try http://home.pacbell....yberg/super8mm/

Cheers and welcome!
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#4 Joseph Nesbitt

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Posted 01 October 2007 - 04:50 PM

I have a mac with a fairly new version of final cut pro will this wirk, plus how much is super 8 film
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#5 Toby L Edwards

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Posted 01 October 2007 - 05:33 PM

If your using a Mac with FCP you probably have a fire wire port so you can capture Mini DV.
You can order Film from KODAK it is available in 50' carts and they cost about $15.00 each. Go to the Kodak web site and check it out.
http://www.kodak.com...8mm/index.jhtml
Toby
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#6 Michael Lehnert

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Posted 01 October 2007 - 05:39 PM

I have a mac with a fairly new version of final cut pro will this wirk, plus how much is super 8 film


A fast Mac of recent vintage with FCP should be fine for standard transfer of film to video.

The cost of S8 film varies from seller to seller and from type of film to type of film, from continent to country and also from the different packages (film cartridge itself incl. development and transfer can often be a better deal than buying the cartridge with the film in it alone) and so on...

Have a stroll around Giles Perkins Film type page at http://homepage.mac....uper8/film.html and download the PDF there, which gives a great overview of the suppliers. Check their websites for current pricing (pricing can change: http://spectrafilman...o.com/Film.html )

Roughly: Film plus development around 30-35 USD. An excellent transfer to miniDV at Spectra (incl. film + dev.) costs 110 USD.
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#7 Joseph Nesbitt

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Posted 01 October 2007 - 06:47 PM

thanks everyone, sorry about my poor spelling "of final cut pro will this wirk," anyway how long does that transfer usually take, weeks or days? and is it optional on the medium such as film to dvd? ( Not talking about editing of coarse but rather just the raw footage )
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#8 Joseph Nesbitt

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Posted 01 October 2007 - 06:53 PM

never mind about that last question I just checked out that link sent by Michael, anyways one of the cheaper alternatives mentioned was using a projector and taping the projected image with a mini dv camcorder, but does this defeat the purpose of using film is in the end all your doing is using the same standerd of mini dv? and also how would you go about capturing sound using this method?
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#9 Michael Lehnert

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Posted 01 October 2007 - 07:13 PM

never mind about that last question I just checked out that link sent by Michael, anyways one of the cheaper alternatives mentioned was using a projector and taping the projected image with a mini dv camcorder, but does this defeat the purpose of using film is in the end all your doing is using the same standerd of mini dv? and also how would you go about capturing sound using this method?


Projecting the film is really a great experience, giving "home cinema" a somwhat true meaning. However, if you wanna tape that projected image NOT using one of the more professional installations some members here offer (Justin Lovell, Mitch Perkins & Rick Palidwor), let alone a serious Scanner or Telecine machine like a Rank Cintel as offered by Spectra, expect seriously inferior quality.

Just filming the screen-projected picture with a cam is good when you give a toss about getting anything really filmic out of Super 8, and the only thing you want is flickerish images that give a bad home movie look.

Using good transfer from film to miniDV will give you good quality, and the quality gets better if you use a Telecine to HDV or whatever, with a HD Telecine direct to hard drive being the pinnacle of quality (but expensive... like seriously expensive)

Sound and film is a topic for itself. I don't want to give the appearance to cut you short here, but the following thread

http://www.cinematog...showtopic=26088

puts together some of the stuff discussed here about Super 8 over the past years. It'll take you probably one hour to read through the threads, but it will greatly improve the understanding of what this is all about.
Start with the newbie post down in the thread, and then go through the most-read post earlier in the threads.

I am sure that'll help a lot.
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#10 Toby L Edwards

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Posted 01 October 2007 - 07:35 PM

First let me say that you can buy Reversal film from Kodak. "Kodak 64T" and process it and play it on a projector. Processing is only Like $10.00 a roll. Super 8 looks Amazing when projected. I recommend you buy a good camera and a projector. Make sure when you by a camera that it's compatible with Kodak 64T. Search online(before you buy) for camera information when you find one you like.

Film will still look like film if you project it onto a wall and record it with your Mini DV cam. It just could look a heck of alto better. I think the reason your here is because you like the way Super 8 looks. I know that's why I'm here. It looks so much better than Mini DV. After you practice with the Reversal stock "Kodak 64T" you could try the Negative stock's The same stock's they use in Hollywood.

In my opinion the best low budget way to go is to have the film transfered to Mini DV tape by the Lab when they process it. You can then capture it into your computer using FCP.

Film camera's don't record sound. You can use your MiniDV Camera to record the sound then sink them together in FCP.
Good luck, and welcome to "Film" Making.

Toby
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