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#1 tanner wolfe

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Posted 02 October 2007 - 12:29 AM

were these lights daylight balanced? where do they come in on color tempature. was this light a predominantly b&w era tool?
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 02 October 2007 - 12:39 AM

They were daylight-balanced. There were special "yellow" carbons for tungsten shooting but no one was really happy with them, prefering to gel the regular carbon arcs to convert 5500K to 3200K.

They still get used occasionally, though they require an electrician trained to use them and to keep an eye on the carbons, trimming them as they burn down. And they need a smokestack and ventilation tube to the outside of the stage. And they need DC power.

They were replaced by large HMI's like the 18K HMI fresnel, though in many ways, the carbon brute arc puts out a better light.
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#3 Chris Keth

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Posted 02 October 2007 - 01:16 AM

They were replaced by large HMI's like the 18K HMI fresnel, though in many ways, the carbon brute arc puts out a better light.


Define "better light". I'm curious about this. :huh:
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#4 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 02 October 2007 - 01:38 AM

Define "better light". I'm curious about this. :huh:


There was a great article last year in AC. It was an interview with Nicola Pecorini. He much prefers the look of incandescents to HMI's. To him, an incandescent, a light that's coming from a "flame" of sorts, has a noticeably different and more natural quality to it, keeping in mind that sunlight comes from a giant fire. He wishes he could use arcs, but they're just impractical nowadays.

This is something that I had been noticing before reading the article. HMI's seem to have a harder and less natural quality to them, in my opinion, but because of their efficiency they're everywhere.
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#5 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 02 October 2007 - 01:39 AM

Sharper shadow pattern, more consistent color temp.

Talk to projectionists who rhapsodize about the days of carbon arc print projection, before xenon bulbs took over. There's something more accurate about the color of a carbon arc. It's also slightly warmer than most HMI's and Xenons.

Unlike the big globe of an 18K HMI or a 20K tungsten, a carbon arc flame was more of a point source.
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#6 Fredrik Backar FSF

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Posted 02 October 2007 - 01:49 PM

Sharper shadow pattern, more consistent color temp.

Talk to projectionists who rhapsodize about the days of carbon arc print projection, before xenon bulbs took over. There's something more accurate about the color of a carbon arc. It's also slightly warmer than most HMI's and Xenons.

Unlike the big globe of an 18K HMI or a 20K tungsten, a carbon arc flame was more of a point source.



HMI difference to Tungsten or incandescents could be explained by comparing it to equalizer filtering of sound. There is a thing called Q-value describing the
accuracy of a frequency filter. The better the Q-value; the less frequenzies outside of what is wanted also come in. The HMI´s could be said to have a better Q-value meaning that they allow almost only for the one specific temperature/frequency needed. Tungsten and carbon archs on the other hand let in a much bigger array of frequencies but with a very high bias for the temperature wanted hence giving them a greater resemblance to "natural" light.

I also find HMI´s not to be very flattering on skin or in general, I try to use large T sources as much as I can (budgets.....) such as wendys and T24s and so on. Even on exteriors but gelled instead.

All best :-)
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#7 Adam Frisch FSF

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Posted 02 October 2007 - 01:50 PM

Jeffrey Kimball, ASC used them up until a couple of years ago. Maybe he still does?
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#8 Fredrik Backar FSF

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Posted 02 October 2007 - 02:06 PM

Jeffrey Kimball, ASC used them up until a couple of years ago. Maybe he still does?


Kudos to a master for being able to!

Hej Adam! Hur gick videon? :-)
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#9 Brad Grimmett

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Posted 02 October 2007 - 05:36 PM

Don FauntLeRoy used arcs on Jeepers Creepers. I'm not sure if he still does.
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#10 John Sprung

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Posted 02 October 2007 - 05:57 PM

Don FauntLeRoy used arcs on Jeepers Creepers. I'm not sure if he still does.

The hard part is getting the carbons. The VistaVision room at Paramount was the last carbon projection setup they had, IIRC, they changed it out recently. They were running low on pencils last I talked to Mike. The carbons contain some rare earth elements that are hard to get now.



-- J.S.
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#11 timHealy

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Posted 03 October 2007 - 09:08 PM

Jeffrey Kimball, ASC used them up until a couple of years ago. Maybe he still does?


I just finished a movie with him and no arcs were used. Not to say he won't use them in the future. But he was a big fan of using the 100 and 50k soft sun on this one.

I have only used arcs on two films a long time ago and would welcome the chance again.

Best

Tim

Edited by timHealy, 03 October 2007 - 09:10 PM.

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