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Training day


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#1 Miguel Bunster

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Posted 03 October 2007 - 07:51 PM

Hi,
Hate to ask but I havent been able to find an article about Treaining day and I am sure i so one in ASC Mag..may be wrong. Any direction swould be welcomed.
Thanks!
M
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#2 Miguel Bunster

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Posted 03 October 2007 - 08:19 PM

Oopps and forgot about Friday Night Lights....as well any guidance would be great!
Thanks
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#3 William A Chapman Jr

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Posted 03 October 2007 - 09:24 PM

The ASC website list all the back issues, I took a look but did not see them listed, I could have missed them though. Also check out the ICG website they might have it if AC dosen't
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#4 Miguel Bunster

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Posted 03 October 2007 - 10:21 PM

I did, checked all, ASC web site has not lsited the 2001 (when the film came out), checkd artfull text data base too etc...no luck...
brbrbrb
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#5 Bobby Shore

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Posted 04 October 2007 - 02:03 AM

I did, checked all, ASC web site has not lsited the 2001 (when the film came out), checkd artfull text data base too etc...no luck...
brbrbrb


I just ripped this off another reply to the exact same question from a couple years ago...

"Man on Fire" was covered in the April 2004 issue of International Cinematographers Guidld magazine [ICG]

Film stocks:

5284 Expression - often pushed 1-2 stops for night and day interiors and to supplement with 5274 and 5248 for daytime, Cameron mentioned the '84 "had significant grain that just boiled in the high [lights]

Kodak reversal 5285 cross processed and pushed as needed


Cameras:

(2) 35mm Panavision Millenium XLs
(2) Arri 2C hand cranked
(1) Arri 435 HS
(2) 16mm Aaton XTR Prod
(1) 16mm Aaton A-Minima

A total of 17 cameras were used in the scene where the club explodes, 4 in fireboxes and one over a mile away to catch the explosion.

Lenses:

several 11-1 zooms
135-420 lenes
complete set of Mark II primes
Super 35 2:40 - special ground glasses were made for the 16mm cameras

As mentioned in a previous post, they would often back crank the cameras, sometimes stopping down the aperture, and [sometimes] covering the lenses and then exposing the film again.

Lighting: (partial)

12K HMI Pars
1200 HMI Pars
7K Xenons
2K
Practicals
Par Cans
Kino Flos
12 light maxi brutes, used on dimmers at times.

Additional Info:

Cameron favors Rosco Cal Color gels and used a combination he has employed on other films like "Gone in Sixty Seconds' [American Cinematographer article online at the AC site] for a night scene outside the club that Denzel Washington's character, Creasy, destroys in the building. Apricot and Cal Color 30 on 12K HMI Pars for a sodium vapor look and Full Plus Green and 1/2 Blue on other 12K's for a Mercury Vapor look. When Denzel goes inside the club, Cameron used 20 Data Flash heads around the room in a circular chase pattern and 50,000 watts of light from another dozen or so Lighting Strikes units, combined with 2 7K Xenons hitting a disco ball in the center of the room. Another 20 + HMI 1200 Pars and 2Ks accented the architecture of the building along with 50 or more fluorescent cool white tubes.

The practicals were accented with Cal Color Yellow 30 to dirty them up. Other bulbs were left bare and Kinos were hidden around the room.
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#6 Bobby Shore

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Posted 04 October 2007 - 02:06 AM

sorry man, I was just reading about man on fire in another forum topic and got the two confused... guess Denzel's just that good.


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