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GY-HD100E in an NTSC environement


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#1 Bruno Desrosiers

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Posted 05 October 2007 - 01:31 PM

Hi all, Hope I can have a clear answer here...

I am in Canada and someone is making me a hell of a good deal on a GY-HD100E (PAL)
Now, since I only and ONLY plan to shoot in HDV with that cam, is there any other problems I can encounter using this cam on my system, FinalCut Pro 6, I also plan to shoot mostly in 24p.

Any of you can comfirm me that I shoudl or should not get the cam, I could get it tonight actually...

thanx in advance

-B
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#2 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 05 October 2007 - 03:34 PM

Hi,

About the only thing I can think of (assuming the power supplies are 110V/60Hz compatible, which I'd be astounded to find they weren't) is that the composite encoders may be PAL rather than NTSC. I'm actually not sure how it works on the 100 - it may be switchable.

The E model may also not allow firewire video input.

Phil
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#3 Kirill Nersesyan

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Posted 11 October 2007 - 01:20 AM

This is actually an interesting point. I just got a 111E version of JVC - 'cause I need to shoot a movie for a Russian Market that utilizes and uses PAL. I have discovered (and I knew this could happen, but with the more expensive pro camcorders it is never an issue - they have a built-in electronic switcher) that the European model gave quite a lot of flicker under the American fluorescent lights (consumer - regular indoor daylight tubes). Again with the more expensive professional head like 900 series or whatever - that is not an issue. I am trying to see whether it could be dealt with through the menu, but no luck so far - I did manage to eliminate some of them by switching the shutter to a different value - but that eats up the stop.
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#4 Michael Nash

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Posted 11 October 2007 - 02:07 AM

I have discovered (and I knew this could happen, but with the more expensive pro camcorders it is never an issue - they have a built-in electronic switcher) that the European model gave quite a lot of flicker under the American fluorescent lights (consumer - regular indoor daylight tubes). Again with the more expensive professional head like 900 series or whatever - that is not an issue. I am trying to see whether it could be dealt with through the menu, but no luck so far - I did manage to eliminate some of them by switching the shutter to a different value - but that eats up the stop.


Switching from 1/50 second to 1/60 second eats up about 1/4 stop, same as any camera no matter how expensive.
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#5 Kirill Nersesyan

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Posted 11 October 2007 - 02:09 AM

Switching from 1/50 second to 1/60 second eats up about 1/4 stop, same as any camera no matter how expensive.

you are totally right!
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