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fine detail green screen


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#1 Niki Mundo

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Posted 08 October 2007 - 04:28 PM

I know that large props,people and sets can be green screened/chroma-keyed but I was wondering about smaller objects such as a pencil or a coin?

Also what about filming chroma-keyed people from 50-100 feet away to be put into a crowd scene? Any problems?

Thanks!
Niki Mundo
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#2 Michael Nash

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Posted 08 October 2007 - 04:50 PM

You're limited by the resolution of the original capture, the resolution of the composited image, and the compression of both.

If you're afraid you might lose too much detail in a subject you can always shoot it larger in the frame, and then shrink it into place in the comp. But if detail is too fine to be resolved in the comp anyway, you don't have to go nuts with the "oversampling."
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#3 Niki Mundo

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Posted 08 October 2007 - 07:34 PM

OK..what about for a shoot-out scene with gunfire.

Instead of CGI..(I know it can be done easier, but I hate easy)

I go to a range fire a semi-auto in front of a green screen (also paint the weapon green) and then composite the muzzle flash and case ejections onto the final scene.

Would that look right? Or would the detail be too small?
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#4 Michael Nash

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Posted 08 October 2007 - 07:49 PM

As long as it looks right, what's wrong with "easy?" Maybe what you're after is just something more custom and not "stock" looking.

For things like flame/smoke effects it's not that the edges are too fine, but that there's a level of transparency to the edges. Dealing with transparent matte edges is really a post issue.

Gun flash elements should be easy enough to come by that you don't need to try to create your own. For one thing, the real thing usually doesn't look as "cool" as what you see in the movies, and it takes a munitions expert to alter the charges to get the right flash. And FWIW, transparent matte elements like smoke and fire are better shot against black instead of green.
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#5 Will Earl

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Posted 10 October 2007 - 07:11 PM

Okay, so I must warn you this is a vfx breakdown for Star Wars fan-film (arghh!), but it does give a idea of how vfx elements are shot and composited.



And this will give you a good idea of how to deal with muzzle flashes in comp...

http://www.videocopi...rial.html?id=38

Hope that helps.
-W
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Visual Products

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Aerial Filmworks

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Gamma Ray Digital Inc

The Slider

Opal

Glidecam

Paralinx LLC

FJS International, LLC

Tai Audio

CineLab

Abel Cine

rebotnix Technologies