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Scum of The Earth


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#1 Michael Nash

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Posted 10 October 2007 - 04:30 PM

Here's a music video I gaffed recently for the band "Scum of The Earth" (offshoot from White Zombie). Director Ron Najor; DP Michael Rizzi, editor Adam Thomson.

(The QT version of course looks much better than Youtube)

QT: http://thebuzzla.com... video only.mov

Youtube:

Shot with an HVX200, stock lens, mounted on a portajib on track. We had 9 DV cameras feeding the 11 20" monitors live. All the HVX camera moves and focus buzzes were done in-camera, although there are some edits hidden in the whip pans to combine elements of the best takes.

Lighting was very simple, the band's key was a 12'x12' half grid with three 1.2 HMI's, a 4' 4-bank kino over the monitors and one on the ground by the two monitors at the beginning. Everything daylight balanced to match the monitors, and then the monitor images were desaturated a little for the "look." The final color correction is pretty close to what we shot on set.

Excuse the burry stills, I took them with a pocket camera and no flash.

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#2 Richard Boddington

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Posted 10 October 2007 - 06:02 PM

When I first read the thread title I thought this was going to be about agents or some thing?

R,
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#3 Matthew Buick

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Posted 18 October 2007 - 05:13 PM

I thought it would be about Unions.
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#4 Alexander Disenhof

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Posted 18 October 2007 - 08:09 PM

As you said all the HVX moves were done in camera, how did you get the extremely fast shaking near the end of the video? (when the actual band is being shot, not the monitors) Was the camera zoomed in and just shaken by someone handholding it? Or was it on a tripod with a loose connection? Or something else? I tried to get this extremely fast shake in camera once, and found that my best results came when I did it in post. Just wondering!
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#5 Michael Nash

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Posted 18 October 2007 - 09:54 PM

The camera was zoomed in quite a bit, and the pan on the head was locked so that shake would only affect the tilt. Because the shake was limited to the vertical direction some of the shots looked kind of like film running through a projector or telecine that's out of synch.
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