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Middle East Underexposing S16mm the negative film & Bleach by pass


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#1 Valentina Caniglia

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Posted 12 October 2007 - 01:17 PM

I am shooting a feature film in Middle East with S16mm a month and I would like to know some information about film processing.

The look I am aiming for is desaturated and contrasty.

I was thinking to do bleach by pass on the negative film. What would be be the results?

If the production doesn't want to do bleach by pass on the negative, Can I achieve a similar look if I underexpose the film and process normal?

If I use S16mm Kodak 7217 200T and 7218 500T and I underexpose 1 stop and print normal what would be the final look?

I will do test but I would like to know your opinion before. If any of you have had any experience with this developing process let me know.

Thank You

Valentia Camiglia
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 12 October 2007 - 06:53 PM

Bleach-bypass to the negative causes:
1) a big increase in density, especially in the highlights, causing them to burn-out faster. This is one reason most people compensate by rating the stock a stop faster (underexposing one stop).
2) increase in contrast
3) decrease in color saturation
4) increase in graininess (from the addition of larger silver grains, plus any extra graininess from underexposing one stop.)

Underexposing one-stop and printing back up causes:
1) a little more graininess
2) weaker, milkier blacks, which can give the impression of less contrast because of the lack of "snap" in the image.

However, black levels can be adjusted if doing digital color-correction to the image. For printing, to restore the blacks, you'd have to either use a stock with a higher D-max (blacks) like Fuji XD or Kodak Premier, or doing a skip-bleach or other silver retention process to the print stock. Probably for something as mild as a one-stop underexposure, simply printing onto a stock like Fuji XD or Kodak Premier would be enough to restore contrast and blacks.

Color saturation can also be controlled if doing digital color-correction to the image.
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#3 kevin jackman

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Posted 13 October 2007 - 01:53 AM

i would really realy suggest doing a test!
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#4 Valentina Caniglia

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Posted 19 October 2007 - 07:03 AM

Thank You

Valentina

Bleach-bypass to the negative causes:
1) a big increase in density, especially in the highlights, causing them to burn-out faster. This is one reason most people compensate by rating the stock a stop faster (underexposing one stop).
2) increase in contrast
3) decrease in color saturation
4) increase in graininess (from the addition of larger silver grains, plus any extra graininess from underexposing one stop.)

Underexposing one-stop and printing back up causes:
1) a little more graininess
2) weaker, milkier blacks, which can give the impression of less contrast because of the lack of "snap" in the image.

However, black levels can be adjusted if doing digital color-correction to the image. For printing, to restore the blacks, you'd have to either use a stock with a higher D-max (blacks) like Fuji XD or Kodak Premier, or doing a skip-bleach or other silver retention process to the print stock. Probably for something as mild as a one-stop underexposure, simply printing onto a stock like Fuji XD or Kodak Premier would be enough to restore contrast and blacks.

Color saturation can also be controlled if doing digital color-correction to the image.


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The Slider

Visual Products

Ritter Battery

Metropolis Post

Glidecam

Technodolly

Paralinx LLC

Aerial Filmworks

CineLab

Rig Wheels Passport

FJS International, LLC

Wooden Camera

Abel Cine

rebotnix Technologies

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Tai Audio

Opal

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS