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how different is AVID from FCP


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#1 Noam Gagliardi Rabinovich

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Posted 12 October 2007 - 08:03 PM

I only know FCP, and I know it pretty well. FCP felt pretty intuitive to me from the first use, the only things that weren't were the more advanced features and better file management.

but I think that I might be cutting myself off from like half of the job opportunities out there; not everyone has come over to the dark side of lord Darth Jobs...

are the two programs similar enough that if I had to work on an avid system I wouldn't be completely lost or make deadly mistakes? is it a matter of a few things that are a bit different but can be overcome with a bit of common sense? or are they really different, enough to have to take a course and start learning AVID from the basics?

and another thing... there's like, more AVID versions out there than there are movies made in india!! ah! which one?
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#2 Timo Klages

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Posted 15 October 2007 - 06:32 AM

and another thing... there's like, more AVID versions out there than there are movies made in india!! ah! which one?


since i haven´t used FCP really seriously for editing at all up to this point, i am only answering your last question.

basically, for editing purpose, the workflow is pretty much the same, no matter if you use XPress Pro, FreeDV or Mediacomposer. I think, even Newscutter will be the same when it comes to editing. Adrenalin is just referring to the hardware attached (basically it´s the same as MC (mediacomposer)).
Symphony is giving you more features for finishing / conforming purposes (great color correction), DS is made for compositing and finishing purpose (it once was Softimage DS).

SO, basically, only DS (Nitris) is different from all the other Avid´s that basically give you the same Editing interface with different features (like more video and audio tracks, better timewarps and so on...).

i hope that helps a bit...
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#3 Julia Gers

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Posted 15 October 2007 - 09:12 AM

I've really only used avid, as well. I was looking at final cut on a mac at the apple store once, and it seemed a lot more confusing to me than avid. My dad (who's an editor) tried to explain fcp to me and it made no sense, but when he explained avid it did make sense. Maybe I'm just too partial to pcs as apposed to macs or something...
For the past year or so my dad has been thinking about getting a mac just so he can have the right system to run fcp on. Can you use final cut on a pc, or does it only work on macs? ...I think I should get an ibook or some mac/apple laptop to put final cut on before I go to college...though most of the art/film schools I've looked at use avid. When I visited SCAD's film department they said that "avid is the industry standard," but I don't think that's true. I really don't think either avid or fcp is "the industry standard." They are both better for different things. If I remember correctly, isn't fcp better for special effects and such?
I'll ask my dad about this topic later and reply back on it if you'd like. Though, I know when I ask him he might talk for an hour or more about it :o .
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#4 Phil Connolly

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Posted 15 October 2007 - 10:18 AM

I learnt to edit on fcp and have since started cutting on Avid.

I found avid less intuative than fcp and frustrating initially, mainly in the way you trim and move shots about on avid compaired to fcp. But once I got my head round avid trim mode, I was ok.

First couple of projects on avid I hated it and was a bit "why can't it more like fcp, its much better". Then the Avid technique 'clicked' and I'm a born again avid user and for straight cutting (I don't really deal with effects and stuff) i prefere it.

The programmes are similar enough that a good percentage of your knowledge will be useful on both, but its worth spending a bit of time on an avid before you use it in anger on a big project.

A good Avid book and a couple of days on an Avid would get you up to speed. I went on a basic avid course after learning fcp and found it a bit slow. Maybe spend some time on Avid Free DV then do an intermediate avid course to learn the more high end features.

Its definatly worth learning both, fcp is taking off and getting used on bigger projects but it won't kill avid off. From my experience in where I'm based (london) there is still more paid work for avid editors than fcp.
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#5 Noam Gagliardi Rabinovich

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Posted 15 October 2007 - 11:33 AM

yea, from the little I've seen it seems confusing. but it seems worth learning if I want some more job opportunities.

I'm in Hamilton/toronto Canada, and around here from what I've seen jobs are just a bit more Final Cut for independent films and short films, but a lot more Avid for TV stuff.

there seems to be more FCP now than before though... maybe it's since they released color and the whole studio thing... I know 300, zodiac, king kong, letters from iwo jima have all been edited in final cut.
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#6 Tenolian Bell

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Posted 15 October 2007 - 06:24 PM

Maybe I'm just too partial to pcs as apposed to macs or something...


There are some key differences between the Mac and Windows user interfaces. Either just takes some getting used to. My experience with showing people the Mac who are used to Windows. They seemed to be inclined to make using a computer more difficult than it really is. When you finally get them to let go of how difficult computers are to use, then they understand how easy it can be.

Can you use final cut on a pc, or does it only work on macs?


Final Cut Studio is Mac only. Just to blow your mind - at one time Avid, ProTools, Photoshop, and Word used to Mac only.

When I visited SCAD's film department they said that "avid is the industry standard," but I don't think that's true.


Yes Avid pretty much is the standard in professional post houses. Largely because of its legacy. FCP has gained a loyal following with lower budget and independent filmmakers. Largely because of its functionality at a lower price.
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#7 Hal Smith

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Posted 15 October 2007 - 09:59 PM

I found Xpress DV Pro pretty easy to get use to. I'm pretty computer literate on some high end engineering applications like Autocad so I've learned how to slow down and really READ new computer software's literature.

Still it's amazing how even as pro a company as Avid can completely gloss over something like Superbin. I looked around through Avid books and help screens trying to find a definition or glossary item for Superbins. Only to find out eventually that all it is a bin that replaces any other bin(s) open at the time you open up the Superbin. I guess that function was added to avoid the debacle of having ten bins open at the same time and not knowing what clip is in which bin without having taking written notes or browsing through all the open bins.
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