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Shooting 7218 in daylight


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#1 Marta Bobic

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Posted 16 October 2007 - 10:07 AM

I'm shooting a short soon on 7218. It may sound odd, seeing as almost all of the film is in daylight, but as there is so little to be shot indoors I don't want the cost of extra stock I won't use, and would rather just use one for the whole thing. I know some people don't like having glass on the lens all the time, but I generally prefer tungsten stocks, and I don't like correcting the other way around (it never looks quite as good).

So my question is, 85 or 85B? I read on the Kodak spec sheet for the 7218 that with an 85 the EI is 320, and with an 85B it's 200. But elsewhere I've heard that the usual 2/3 stop compensation applies to both. I know that an 85B is the 'proper' correction filter for modern stocks, but what is the difference visually between the two? If it really does end up as a 200ASA, then I may as well shoot on the 250D and just gel my lights with CTB for the interior scene.

Any thoughts or advice?
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 16 October 2007 - 12:38 PM

The 85B converts 5500K to 3200K and the 85 converts 5500K to 3400K -- not a big difference, well within a correctable range on color negative. It only matters which one you use if you are shooting reversal for direct projection with no ability to color-correct.
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#3 Marta Bobic

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Posted 16 October 2007 - 02:42 PM

Thanks David, that clears things up a bit. It will be on negative stock, so that part's not a concern.

However, how about the compensation side of things?
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#4 Michael Nash

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Posted 16 October 2007 - 05:54 PM

An 85B filter should reduce light about 2/3 stop. I don't know how this 200 ASA figure came about -- that's a 1-1/3 stop light reduction!

http://www.tiffen.com/displayproduct.html?...itemnum=105C85B
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#5 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 16 October 2007 - 06:56 PM

Just treat them both as losing 2/3's of a stop. Truth is that an 85B filter, from what I've measured, loses more like 3/4 of a stop...
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#6 Adam Thompson

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Posted 17 October 2007 - 07:49 AM

If you use 250D and CTB your lights, you'll lose a lot of their output. You'll need to be use 1 or 2Ks at fairly close range depending on how you need to use the lighting. (Im assuming you have little to work with budget wise) Ive had to do it a few times with small light kits and its amazing how little output they'll have with full correction. You might use 1/2 or 3/4 CTB at most and correct for the rest. If you can rent it, get a small HMI like a Joker.
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#7 Vincent De Paula

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Posted 18 October 2007 - 02:13 AM

Her's a link to some stuff I shot this year on 7218 rated 320ASA with an 85 filter on for the outside shots. I had NDs in the matte box. The framegrabs are from DVCam rushes cloned from the Digibeta dailies.

http://www.vincentde.....0Red Hood.htm

My 2 cents...
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#8 Marta Bobic

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Posted 18 October 2007 - 04:03 AM

Thanks, Vincent! Looks good! I'll post some from my short when I have something to post! I think I will stick with the 7218 and the 85B, it seems that that is the way to go.

And thank you David and Adam too, I'm grateful for the advice.
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