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Essential grip equipment


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#1 Adamo P Cultraro

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Posted 16 October 2007 - 10:57 PM

I've recently purchased a 3 ton grip package. Although all the big stuff is there, including carts, c-stands, apples boxes, sandbags, etc. The small stuff is lacking (and the seller told me so).

What's essential as far as clamps, plates, grip clips, etc - you know, the stuff that will round off the package and is used on ever shoot. I shoot only narrative work, BTW.

I know this is a horribly broad question but any help is appreciated.
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#2 robert duke

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Posted 16 October 2007 - 11:24 PM

I've recently purchased a 3 ton grip package. Although all the big stuff is there, including carts, c-stands, apples boxes, sandbags, etc. The small stuff is lacking (and the seller told me so).

What's essential as far as clamps, plates, grip clips, etc - you know, the stuff that will round off the package and is used on ever shoot. I shoot only narrative work, BTW.

I know this is a horribly broad question but any help is appreciated.


8-12 Cardelini's
10 baby plates
5 junior plates
10 junior pipe clamps
10 baby pipe clamps
24 #2 grip clips
12 #1 grip clips
12 #3 grip clips
4 norms pins
8 grip heads
8 40" arms
8 20" arms
6 mafers
2 menace arm kits
2 putty knifes
10 chain vice with pin
4 platypus/duckbill clamps
assortment of speed rail fittings/speed rail
6-5/8 pin with 3/8 thread

I think this is a good start for your package. It is really about what you use and how you use it. But this is a good start. Contact Modern Studio Equipment. They are great people and offer a discount off list. Private message me for a great guy who sews recovers, rags, bags, and more at super great rates.

What is your location?
Good luck! owning equipment is a blessing and a curse. get and keep everything in writing. get liability insurance. every job get a certificate of insurance. Also give the Line producer a full list of your gear. Make sure they understand Lost and Damage charges.
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#3 Adamo P Cultraro

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Posted 17 October 2007 - 10:38 AM

Hi Robert -

Thanks so much - this really means a lot to me. Even after going through the. Set Lighting technician's handbook, the appendixes didn't contain this information.

I live in Orange County, CA - just south of LA in a little town called Dana Point. Besides this I bought an HMI and Tungsten package as well as all this grip stuff.

Oddly enough (you will all think I'm crazy), I don't plan to hire this stuff out. Whereas I have done some shoots for pay in the past, all this stuff is for the feature I am filming in the spring - one I wrote and am directing. I suppose I am the antithesis of the guy that rents as much as he can. I did a 35mm short last year, also a TV pilot. I rented everything - cameras. trucks, grip, lighting - distro - you name it. At the end of it all, I could've bought most everything besides the camera (which was 125K). Plus, my key grip absconded with the 30' production van filled with hundreds of thousands of dollars in equipment - he went missing for a full day before we found him in a drunken haze. Needless to say we got the van and the equipment back but the extra day rental was a killer. Oh, and he nailed the top of the van on a tree and made a $1200 hole in it. Insurance wouldn't cover it because the only thing insurance doesn't cover is.....overhead damage!

So I was immediately over rentals. I bought out my DP, who moved out of state. I am also buying a grip truck and generator as well as a jib, dolly, and steadicam.

I've made so many shorts that it's time to make a feature and hopefully get DVD distribution. I figure the biggest investment is in the first feature I make - after that I will only have to pay for locations, talent, crew, and food - which is still significant of course but no rentals of any kind.

Right now I'm in the process of having the equipment repainted and reconditioned, the HMi ballasts gone through, etc. I feel comforted in the fact that this stuff will only go where I go from now on.

Thanks again for the help,

Adam
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#4 Hal Smith

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Posted 17 October 2007 - 04:42 PM

Jon Shryock here in OKC has well equipped grip packages. This list might give you some ideas.

Here's a listing of what he has: http://www.jonshryoc.../equipment.html
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#5 robert duke

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Posted 17 October 2007 - 10:02 PM

Well best of luck. I wish you the best. Not all of us Key's are like your last. Owning gear is great if you can afford it. Otherwise it is a big pain in the a**. I own gear and have fits of sell it all and buy more. I just sold my hmi package and have a buyer for my cable package. I perdonally decided to downsize gear into a less electric more grip mode.
If you have the space to store it and the cash to upkeep it go for it.
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#6 Mikael Kern

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Posted 26 June 2008 - 07:11 AM

Hi Robert -

So I was immediately over rentals. I bought out my DP, who moved out of state. I am also buying a grip truck and generator as well as a jib, dolly, and steadicam.


I dont think youre crazy - except if you buy a Steadicam! My advice is that you should get a good Steadicam Owner/Operator. A good operator will want to use his own gear or gear he is familiar with and of course you want a good operator. Operating Steadicam on a feature takes 5-10 years to master. And before that you have to be a cameraman.

Mikael Kern,
Steadicam Operator,
Denmark
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#7 Wilkin Chau

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Posted 26 June 2008 - 08:57 PM

I've recently purchased a 3 ton grip package. Although all the big stuff is there, including carts, c-stands, apples boxes, sandbags, etc. The small stuff is lacking (and the seller told me so).

What's essential as far as clamps, plates, grip clips, etc - you know, the stuff that will round off the package and is used on ever shoot. I shoot only narrative work, BTW.

I know this is a horribly broad question but any help is appreciated.


You can check out Whites.com and take a look at their package trucks for an idea.

I'd also suggest some bounces and negative fill. Like a mirror board, 20X black, 6X butterfly kit and frame. Course when it comes to textiles it can get really really $$$.
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#8 Chad Stockfleth

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Posted 27 June 2008 - 04:40 PM

Grip tape! Can't do anything without it!
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#9 Jesus Sifuentes

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Posted 03 September 2008 - 08:49 PM

Grip tape! Can't do anything without it!


c-47's?
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#10 stephen lamb

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Posted 03 September 2008 - 10:06 PM

24 x 25 lb sand bags

8 x shot bags (or more)


a light in the back of the truck for load ins/load outs at night?
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FJS International, LLC

Paralinx LLC

Broadcast Solutions Inc

rebotnix Technologies

Rig Wheels Passport

Tai Audio

CineTape