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We Own the Night


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#1 Kayvan Gabbay

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Posted 17 October 2007 - 03:50 PM

Granted I thought the above film was faulty in the direction in it's writing. I truly wanted to like it, but the character transformation of Phoenix's character was atrociously bad and unbelievable and some of the acting choices towards the latter portion of the film were questionable at best, where was the direction? i liked most of the story in the 1st half but it could've been a much better, and stronger film across the board?

But there was one thing that amazed be about this film and that was the CINEMATOGRAPHY. It truly evoked the look of the 80s and it felt like there a softness/diffusion over the lens. or something else (i'm not a cinematographer so don't have a clue).

any info would be great? also, anyone know what the stock was and what camera it was filmed with?

thanks.
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#2 Max Jacoby

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Posted 17 October 2007 - 05:13 PM

On imdb there are pics with an Arricam ST and a 27mm Cooke S4 lens. But obviously that combination alone isn't going to give you the look of the picture.

I'm looking forward to this film, even though the writing seems to be a bit weak. James Gray's previous film, 'The Yards' had a really nice look to it. Harris Savides lit that. It was shot on C-Series and he underexposed between 2 1/2 and 3 1/2 stops and printed it up afterwards again. The stock really broke down, the colors became very muted and everything had this nice patina, a gorgeous looking film that is!
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#3 Dan Goulder

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Posted 18 October 2007 - 04:41 PM

The 'bokeh' looked like Cooke S4 and, increasingly rare in this day and age for a wide-distribution film, the movie appeared to be shot in good ol' standard 35 with an optical finish.
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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 18 October 2007 - 09:23 PM

The 'bokeh' looked like Cooke S4 and, increasingly rare in this day and age for a wide-distribution film, the movie appeared to be shot in good ol' standard 35 with an optical finish.


The ICG Magazine article said Cooke lenses were used, but while they planned on doing a photochemical finish, they now planned on doing a D.I. but keeping that look, though the article was written I guess before they did the final work so it's unclear.

The article says it was shot on 5229 (Expression 500T) rated at 500T but pull-processed by one stop. This means that the final negative was a stop underexposed ("thin") probably softening the blacks. He also used a 1/8 Coral warming filter.
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#5 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 18 October 2007 - 10:24 PM

A lot of the INT night scenes in the police station were quite grainy...especially a single shot of Phoenix that was so grainy and sharp that it looked like video, it was strange.

Overall, I thought the film was well shot, except for some perhaps inappropriate handheld near the end. I have to agree with the critique on the writing and direction. The lack of protection that these people had from the Russian mafia, especially being that the Chief of Police was in danger was ridiculous and unrealistic.

There are a lot of plot issues, and some huge problems with Phoenix's character's arc. But I think James Gray is improving with each film he makes, directorially. Guess we'll have to wait another 6 to 7 years before his next film...the way he's going.
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