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plus-x vs. 500T


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#1 Leigh Goldstein

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Posted 22 October 2007 - 06:45 PM

Is there a resource that gives values for grain, contrast and dynamic range for Kodak films Plus-X, Tri-X, Vision2 200T and 500T?

The Kodak site gives vague information.

Clearly Tri-X is going to give larger grain than Plus-X, and 500T than 200T, but how do the color films compare to the b&w films? Do the color films have similiar contrast and dynamic range to the b&w films?

Thanks,
Leigh
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#2 Chris Burke

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Posted 22 October 2007 - 07:13 PM

Is there a resource that gives values for grain, contrast and dynamic range for Kodak films Plus-X, Tri-X, Vision2 200T and 500T?

The Kodak site gives vague information.

Clearly Tri-X is going to give larger grain than Plus-X, and 500T than 200T, but how do the color films compare to the b&w films? Do the color films have similiar contrast and dynamic range to the b&w films?

Thanks,
Leigh


The color stock have much more dynamic range than the b&w reversal. Although I have not shot any of the new formula, the Plus-X is probably the finest grain of the bunch. both the black and white stocks have more contrast than the color neg. If you are looking for contrast, you can add as much as you want in the tk with the 7217 or 7218. The 7218 probably has finer grain, sharper grain than the Tri-X. In short, the color neg is quite different than the black and white, but has much more latitude and is sharper and can be made to look like the black and white, so it is a more forgiving stock to work with, where the black and white ones are trickier to nail down. Cinelab has a great deal on film, processing and telecine. Why not order four rolls, one of each, and do a test?

chris
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#3 alexandros petin

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Posted 22 October 2007 - 07:31 PM

Yes shooting one of all 4 as a test is the ideal, so that you can see yourself what is best for you.
what i think is that the 200t stock is the most forgiving one.

Tri x is grainy (even more as i home process it) and its wonderfull , to my eyes its grainer than the 500t.
thats why my cameras overexpose 500t more than Tri X.

when it comes to comparing the b/ws with the color ones its difficult because the b/w films are reversal and the color are negatives.
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#4 Leigh Goldstein

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Posted 22 October 2007 - 07:34 PM

Thanks, that is a good suggestion.

-Leigh

P.S.

By dynamic range, I meant the logarithm of the ratio of the optical densities of the darkest the film can get to the clearest it can get, which is different than the latitude of the film, which is about ratio of the intensity of light that fully exposes the film to the lowest intensity that produces a response in the film. Anyway that is my meager understanding.
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