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Film Acceleration


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#1 grant mcphee

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Posted 26 October 2007 - 08:02 AM

There's an esoteric film processing technique called 'film acceleration' I've been reading about.

It seems to involve shooting colour reversal, underexposing by 2 stops then developing in a B+W negative developer such as D76. Then, after being exposed to light processed normal in a colour neg developer like C41 (or ECN2?). i.e. developed twice.

The results from stills I've seen are completely bizarre but very interesting.

I was wondering if anyone had tried it with movie film?

I'm going to have a bash next week with some 7280 and processing it myself at home (d76 + C41) but was hoping someone would have tried it in a professional film lab with decent telecine, or if it has been used in any films.

Would be interesting to find out what experiences people have had with this, stills or movie

thanks.
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#2 Brad Grimmett

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Posted 26 October 2007 - 04:04 PM

Could you post a link to an example of this? It sounds interesting but I'd like to get an idea of the results.
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#3 grant mcphee

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Posted 26 October 2007 - 04:33 PM

hi brad.

there dosn't seem to be too much on the interenet but try this:

www.jpgmag.com/stories/1228

http://www.flickr.co...reataccelerate/
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#4 Chris Keth

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Posted 26 October 2007 - 09:10 PM

The problem I see with it would be convincing a lab to do it for you.
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#5 Brad Grimmett

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Posted 27 October 2007 - 05:12 AM

Really cool looking stuff. I cross process a lot and I pretty much always push because I like the look better. This is even closer to what I'd like! The problem is that it's not an easy process. I read that article and it's a bunch of work just to get the film ready for the lab....if they'll even do it. Maybe someday I'll try it, but not this week.
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#6 Hal Smith

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Posted 27 October 2007 - 10:20 AM

Shooting for acceleration, film selection, and processing description at:

http://www.jpgmag.com/stories/1228
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#7 robbie Land

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Posted 27 October 2007 - 04:18 PM

sounds like... what is it called? ENR process? cant remember what it is called but something i practice and alter often with handprocessing motion picture film.
i usually process 16mm reversal or neg film in c-41 first. it provides really nice, in my opinion, high contrast overly saturated images along with the normal hand-processed look.
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#8 John Carson McCarthy

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Posted 30 October 2007 - 05:52 PM

If I get my hands on some color reversal this week, I'll give this a shot monday night when I am doing my other color neg.

I'll most likely use the D-19 for the B+W develop (D-76 just doesn't do it for me).
So Brad if you do take a shot at it, please post results.
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#9 K Borowski

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Posted 30 October 2007 - 09:28 PM

If you're using D-19 as the first developer, which accounts for effective film speed, that'd probably boost the level of push process up to at least 3 1/2 stops over the rated ISO.

IIRC, D-19 produces higher grain, and about two stops more speed than D-76 development with your standard B&W films, which may (just speculation here, of course, I've never done acceleration processing) make it too much for this process.

I'm taking a class right now for which I am trying to get more acquainted with slide film (I shoot almost exclusively C-41 for professional still photography jobs I shoot), so I'm going to give it a try as well on my next roll of E-6, might be well-suited to an upcoming project to set my stuff apart from the slew of digital cameras and photoshop immitations that seem to predominate any still-photography creative discussions these days. This, on the contrary, seems to be right up my alley.

Please post samples and experiences you have, John, so you can make all of the mistakes with your roll and I can have all of the success with mine! ;-)

Regards,

~KB
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#10 John Carson McCarthy

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Posted 31 October 2007 - 08:36 AM

could i do this with color neg?
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#11 Richardson Leao

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Posted 01 November 2007 - 06:44 AM

The normal reversal processing involves:

BW developer (such as D19 or D76 or whatever);

Re-expose

Color developer (based on CD3, generally used in paper development RA-4)

belach/fix


THat's the conventional E6.

You can also use c41 based chem, the difference is that the developer is based on cd4, so, bw dev, re-exp, c41 dev, c41 bleach/fix.

Actually, I just had a burst of excitement and I'll try this this weekend...
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#12 grant mcphee

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Posted 14 December 2008 - 05:42 PM

did anyone else try this?

Heres a few examples of stills I did. I had big problems trying to even get prints made off these as the, now negatives were so thin. would love to see other examples.
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#13 jake harris

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Posted 15 December 2008 - 10:54 AM

Actually, I just had a burst of excitement and I'll try this this weekend...



...so did this happen? I'd really like to see.
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#14 wolfgang haak

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Posted 15 December 2008 - 11:25 AM

That's the cooles thing since holga/lomo cameras.

My favourite.
http://www.flickr.co...reataccelerate/

learn how to develop super 8 this way i must.
may the colour be with you.
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#15 grant mcphee

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Posted 15 December 2008 - 02:19 PM

That's the cooles thing since holga/lomo cameras.

My favourite.
http://www.flickr.co...reataccelerate/

learn how to develop super 8 this way i must.
may the colour be with you.



Not sure why my link disappeared.

http://www.flickr.co...57610860482304/

All of my first attempts had a really strong cyan cast in the negative, making the positive really red. I don't really understand why but maybe Karl does?

I think the problem, at least the problem I have had doing this with super 8 is super thin negatives. It is really difficult to get anything off it. Perhaps a bit more experimenting to get them a little thicker is probably worth trying. Probably best to experiment with 16mm reversal
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#16 wolfgang haak

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Posted 16 December 2008 - 07:59 AM

Not sure why my link disappeared.

http://www.flickr.co...57610860482304/

All of my first attempts had a really strong cyan cast in the negative, making the positive really red. I don't really understand why but maybe Karl does?

I think the problem, at least the problem I have had doing this with super 8 is super thin negatives. It is really difficult to get anything off it. Perhaps a bit more experimenting to get them a little thicker is probably worth trying. Probably best to experiment with 16mm reversal



Grant,
Your link on flickr includes a pic of tree, rather beautiful stuff, but you say, experimented with developing in "coffee"?
I suppose you only refer to the effect you got, not that you actually used coffee as a dye in the process.
lovely stuff anyway.

wolfgang
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#17 grant mcphee

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Posted 16 December 2008 - 01:54 PM

thanks wolfgang. i used coffee as the developer. do a little google search - there are many household items you can use as a developer
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#18 Patrick Neary

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Posted 16 December 2008 - 10:57 PM

Grant,
Your link on flickr includes a pic of tree, rather beautiful stuff, but you say, experimented with developing in "coffee"?
I suppose you only refer to the effect you got, not that you actually used coffee as a dye in the process.
lovely stuff anyway.

wolfgang


It's "Caffenol" developer.

Arm & Hammer Washing Soda, Folgers Instant Coffee and water. Add ascorbic acid powder to reduce staining from the coffee. :)
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#19 Andres Pardo aka Gral Treegan

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Posted 17 December 2008 - 12:32 PM



here i go!!! this clip contain 3 different footages, super 8 b&w, mini dv (the band part) and a try to accelerate the film, i think youre gonna notice wich part is. this was the first try i made and the only one

best wishes!!
GT
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