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transom window lighting


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#1 Julian Weiss

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Posted 26 October 2007 - 03:05 PM

Hello,

next week I will shoot greenscreen for a compositing.
For a good looking final composition without having too much work in post, I need a proper lighting.

The difficulty for me is how to get the actor lighted like from an transom window about 10 meters above (the actor will be placed in an large museum)
I rented a room 5 meters high - so how light this szene?
For better imagination, I attached a simple graphic which shows my attempt :huh:

To fake the diffusion lighting from the surrounding walls I will use softboxes together with dimmers and reflectors.

All in all I have 3 x 1000W (dimmers) and 3 x 650W

Thanks in advance,
Julian Weiß

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#2 Joseph Nesbitt

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Posted 27 October 2007 - 08:57 AM

Maybe a set light would help, or maybe angleing the soft boxes down a bit, maybe somehow outting some sort of half scrim on the bottom half of the soft box. If a window is above him and he is that colse to it the light probably wouldn't be hitting his feet, so therfor the half scrim idea, and a set light of a window shape hitting the floor behind him could work. Also if you raised the softboxes and angled them down, you could pull off the window gag.
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#3 Julian Weiss

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Posted 27 October 2007 - 09:28 AM

Thanks Joseph - The idea to put the softboxes higher and on an angle seems really good working for me. Also the "half scrim idea" is nice! Definitely will try that :)

I attached two shots I took on the orginial location, to compare the lighting on set with the real one - maybe you guys can give me some more suggestions on the lighting ;) - just because the actor will need to walk some meters and the light from above must give the illlustion of being high above..

Thanks!

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#4 Michael Nash

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Posted 27 October 2007 - 03:27 PM

Get the toplight as high as you can to minimize falloff from top to bottom. Then, use an eggcrate baffle to keep the light aimed straight down, so that light from the far side of the source doesn't "wrap" in front of or behind your subject as he moves around. That way, no matter where he is under the source the light will always be coming straight down, looking as though the light source is farther away.
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#5 Julian Weiss

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Posted 28 October 2007 - 10:27 AM

use an eggcrate baffle to keep the light aimed straight down, so that light from the far side of the source doesn't "wrap" in front of or behind your subject as he moves around.


Thanks, thats a very important advice - because I'm not familliar with the technical lighting possibilities it's even more helpful!

I'm planning a 3x2,4m (7,2m²) light source (fabric lighted by 2 or 3 fresnel-lights from above) to give my actor more space to move.
The flat light source will hang about 4m high (actor is 1,8m) - but how high/deep the eggcrate buffles need to be?
I thought about 20-30cm (or less?)- like in the illlustration underneath with about 9x7 seperations?

Thanks for all the help - that really helps :)
Julian Weiß

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Edited by Julian Weiss, 28 October 2007 - 10:28 AM.

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#6 Michael Nash

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Posted 28 October 2007 - 04:01 PM

Since fabric eggcrates usually come in standard sizes there's only so much you can do about it anyway. If you need to make the "stock" eggcrate deeper, you can extend the baffles with duvetyn. You don't have to do all the divisions, just maybe divide into quadrants. This is one of those things where design only takes you so far; the rest you have to fine-tune on set.
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#7 Julian Weiss

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Posted 28 October 2007 - 05:00 PM

Since fabric eggcrates usually come in standard sizes there's only so much you can do about it anyway.


Well, because of the pretty tight budget, I will produce my own eggcrates :lol:
I will buy 1x15m carton tomorrow, cut it, paint it black and put it together like an eggcrate with 25cm depth...I think I will stay with these divisions, cause I now know that I only can hang this thing 1.1m above the actors head...

Do you think that would work? :huh:
Thanks
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#8 Michael Nash

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Posted 28 October 2007 - 05:15 PM

I have no way of knowing how well your homemade eggcrate will work. It might, it might not. Either way, be prepared to tweak or modify it to the setup once you're on set.
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#9 Julian Weiss

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Posted 28 October 2007 - 05:18 PM

allright, thanks for your help so far :)

When it's finished I will upload a picture of my selfmade eggcrate - if it's not too awkward :lol:
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#10 Julian Weiss

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Posted 02 November 2007 - 01:17 PM

Allright, as promised - the picture...
:lol: ;) It works pretty well for me...

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#11 Michael Nash

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Posted 02 November 2007 - 11:55 PM

Quite industrious of you! Did you do your shoot yet? How did it work out?
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#12 Julian Weiss

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Posted 04 November 2007 - 08:46 AM

Hehe, thx - I already shot on two days, and it worked quite ok, but only 4 of the 6 rented fresnel lights were working, so I was really really not in a good mood that first day.
On the second day I came up with two halogen spotlights used on construction site to light up the eggcrate buffle
In the end the two 500W spotlights were far too small for this job, but better than nothin... :o

I think my knowledge on filming, building a set, directing, equipment, use of dollies e.g. grew up a lot during these two days :)
To have some lousy lighted shots itsn't too bad in the end, I still can pull a little bit out of it in postproduction ;)

Thanks,
Julian

Edited by Julian Weiss, 04 November 2007 - 08:47 AM.

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Visual Products