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And for my first question....


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#1 Donny Jones

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Posted 28 October 2007 - 10:24 PM

Ok, I've always wondered how people acheive this shot. Ok, you have one person moving at a normal pace. But everyone around them moves at an extremely fast pace. I would think you would have to do two seperate shots and compose them together. But not quite sure how to do that, I use Final Cut HD Express as my editing program.
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#2 Nick Mulder

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Posted 28 October 2007 - 10:53 PM

have a look at the 'showreel' section of this page

That will give you some hints for the front end - as for the post side of things programs like Shake, Flame and good ol' After Effects will help you out there, although depending on the complexity and time constraints you could nut out the same thing in FC - that is not my speciality though (if I even have one ;))
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#3 Matthew W. Phillips

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Posted 28 October 2007 - 11:01 PM

Ok, I've always wondered how people acheive this shot. Ok, you have one person moving at a normal pace. But everyone around them moves at an extremely fast pace. I would think you would have to do two seperate shots and compose them together. But not quite sure how to do that, I use Final Cut HD Express as my editing program.


I don't know how "Hollywood" does it, but if I were to be cheap and generic, which I am, I would film the people around going at a normal pace, have my subject go at a super slow pace, then film at a decreased frame rate for fast motion. OR, if you're shooting digitally where you can't control frame rate, I would increase the speed in post until you get the desired speed of your subject. Then the people around will proportionally be faster. Like I said, it's how I would do it.
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#4 Toby L Edwards

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Posted 29 October 2007 - 04:57 PM

If I were going to do this shot I would shoot two Plates. One of the back round and one of the main subject and composite the two. Not sure what your shooting but most likely you will need to rotoscope the forground action to composite into the back round. There is a good example of this effect at Rarevision.com


Toby
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#5 Donny Jones

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Posted 29 October 2007 - 08:18 PM

Thanks guys. Is there any sort of glossary for these terms? I'm relatively new to this (in high school, just took my first intro course last year) so some of these are unfamiliar to me (rotoscope?) If you guys know of a good place I'd be thankful if you threw it my way. Thanks.
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#6 Matthew W. Phillips

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Posted 29 October 2007 - 08:36 PM

Thanks guys. Is there any sort of glossary for these terms? I'm relatively new to this (in high school, just took my first intro course last year) so some of these are unfamiliar to me (rotoscope?) If you guys know of a good place I'd be thankful if you threw it my way. Thanks.


According to Wikipedia "Rotoscoping is an animation technique in which animators trace over live-action film movement, frame by frame, for use in animated films." I'm not sure how he figured it relates to this, but I leave that for him to explain.

Just remember, there is always more than one way to do ANYTHING if you're creative enough.
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#7 Nick Mulder

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Posted 29 October 2007 - 08:50 PM

again... not my area of expertise but: rotoscoping as it is refered to mostly nowadays refers to the work done in lieu of a color, luma or otherwise keyed composite scene - ie. the mask is done frame by frame (tweened keyframe to keyframe) pretty much the same as original rotoscoping but with a different end in sight (a mask).

Its a lot of work compared to getting a good key in the first place, which in turn is more work in the front end... Depending on different factors, you may decide to go either way - its the process where a lot of the "we'll fix it in post" is acheived

Get a manual for After Effects or similar and have a read ;) Many special effects books at your library will go through the historical processes that have now been emulated digitally (and hence the nomenclature remains) - well worth a read also
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#8 Toby L Edwards

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Posted 30 October 2007 - 06:55 PM

again... not my area of expertise but: rotoscoping as it is refered to mostly nowadays refers to the work done in lieu of a color, luma or otherwise keyed composite scene - ie. the mask is done frame by frame (tweened keyframe to keyframe) pretty much the same as original rotoscoping but with a different end in sight (a mask).

Its a lot of work compared to getting a good key in the first place, which in turn is more work in the front end... Depending on different factors, you may decide to go either way - its the process where a lot of the "we'll fix it in post" is acheived

Get a manual for After Effects or similar and have a read ;) Many special effects books at your library will go through the historical processes that have now been emulated digitally (and hence the nomenclature remains) - well worth a read also


Nick' Matt
You are booth correct. I use a program called Commotion Pro. I think the Production Bundle of AE has this feature all well.
You basically draw a line around elements that you want to isolate and create a Mask for. This is a good way to Key something out if you cant pull a green, blue key or a Luma key.

Donny'
You could use this technique to achieve the effect you mentioned.
You start by shooting the the seen of the people walking by the camera. Make sure the camera is locked down.( on a Tripod and not moving)
You then shoot you actor say standing on his hands. Now when the two clips are captured into your editing system. You speed the first one up so the people are moving faster than normal. On the second shot you rotoscope the actor only and create a Key. Now when the rotoscoped clip is placed on top of the first clip, it will appear as if everyone is there at the same time. Because the camera is locked down the back rounds will line up creating hopefully a seamless match.

Toby
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#9 Donny Jones

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Posted 30 October 2007 - 10:02 PM

Alright, thanks guys. I'll play around with it and see what I can come up with.
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