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Dalsa Fundamentals


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#1 John Sprung

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Posted 30 October 2007 - 02:42 PM

The Dalsa company, though relatively new to the camera business, is a major maker of imaging chips. A lot of satellite images come from Dalsa chips.

The Origin camera chip is a single Bayer masked CCD, 4046 photosites wide by 2048 photosites high. The physical size of the image area is 34.0 mm x 17.2 mm (1.339" x 0.677"). The photosites are square, on 8.4 micron centers, separated by 1.6 micron borders. The raw Bayer data has a depth of 16 bits per sample.

The camera has an optical viewfinder fed by a rotating mirror shutter.

OK, there's a start. Can others fill in the rest, processing, compression, etc?

Would it be a good idea to do this kind of overview summary for the rest of the HD camera subforums?



-- J.S.
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 30 October 2007 - 03:18 PM

There's some info here:
http://www.dalsa.com...origin_main.asp

This is a good site for info:
http://www.hdcompare.com/Cameras.htm
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#3 Benjamin_Lussier

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Posted 25 March 2008 - 08:47 PM

You say it`s an optical viewfinder fed by a rotating mirror shutter... Is it WYSIWYG only when ur watching the video assist ?

Im feeling kinda sad about the slow death of Film tho...

Dont get me wrong... I think HD looks great especially now that it has greater lattitude in terms of gamma ect... But I dunno.
It`s a different look. One people will have to get used to I guess.

But there`s something so... magical about film... It just surprises you whenever u sit down and watch the rushes (for better or worse.. but often for the better).
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#4 John Brawley

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Posted 25 March 2008 - 09:00 PM

The camera has an optical viewfinder fed by a rotating mirror shutter.

-- J.S.



There's no doubt about the camera's credentials.

The problem with this camera is that you can only get them in LA. Well practically speaking that is. Unless you're james bond and can afford the rental, time and cost it takes to ship them ex LA.

This camera's never going to be more than niche until they find a way around that issue.

Bloody shame, because it looks the goods.

jb
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#5 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 25 March 2008 - 09:37 PM

There was one sat on the bench at Codex last week...

P
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#6 Illya Friedman

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Posted 26 March 2008 - 09:44 PM

There was one sat on the bench at Codex last week...

P


That's sounds right. We have some cameras in Europe now, London and Paris, and of course here in North America.

We haven't entered into an agreement with anyone in Australia, Asia or India. Although I've been receiving many inquiries since IBC 2007.

I.

Illya Friedman
DALSA
Digital Cinema Division
www.dalsa.com/dc
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#7 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 02 April 2008 - 05:06 AM

That's sounds right. We have some cameras in Europe now, London and Paris, and of course here in North America.

We haven't entered into an agreement with anyone in Australia, Asia or India. Although I've been receiving many inquiries since IBC 2007.

I.

Illya Friedman
DALSA
Digital Cinema Division
www.dalsa.com/dc


When's the DALSA Evolution going to be available?
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#8 John Sprung

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Posted 02 April 2008 - 12:48 PM

You say it`s an optical viewfinder fed by a rotating mirror shutter... Is it WYSIWYG only when ur watching the video assist ?

No, just like with a film camera, you have an image in the viewfinder even with no power at all to the camera.

The mirror shutter is at a 45 degree angle to the film or chip plane, and blocks the light from the film or chip while reflecting it to a ground glass. The ground glass image is identically the same size as the image on the film/chip, and the rest of the viewfinder system is basically just a low power microscope to make it easy to see the ground glass image, plus some prisms to put the eyepiece in a convenient place.



-- J.S.
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#9 Illya Friedman

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Posted 02 April 2008 - 08:47 PM

No, just like with a film camera, you have an image in the viewfinder even with no power at all to the camera.

The mirror shutter is at a 45 degree angle to the film or chip plane, and blocks the light from the film or chip while reflecting it to a ground glass.


The shutter angle is of course adjustable from 45-200 degrees.

I.

Illya Friedman
DALSA
Digital Cinema Division
www.dalsa.com/dc
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#10 Illya Friedman

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Posted 02 April 2008 - 08:52 PM

When's the DALSA Evolution going to be available?


Unfortunately, the best answer I can give is *soon*. Are you asking specifically in regards to the start date of a project?


There's a new color combination for the EVO which can be seen at the S.Two booth during NAB.

I.

Illya Friedman
DALSA
Digital Cinema Division
www.dalsa.com/dc
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#11 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 03 April 2008 - 03:53 AM

Unfortunately, the best answer I can give is *soon*. Are you asking specifically in regards to the start date of a project?


There's a new color combination for the EVO which can be seen at the S.Two booth during NAB.


No, just curious when you recently mentioned the Evolution on REDuser. Having seen the issues that can come up during development for example with the RED and the SI cameras, I can understand the rubbery nature of "soon".
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#12 Mitch Gross

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Posted 03 April 2008 - 11:30 AM

The shutter angle is of course adjustable from 45-200 degrees.

I.

Illya Friedman
DALSA
Digital Cinema Division
www.dalsa.com/dc

He was referring to the physical angle of the shutter in relation to the sensor plane, which is how it redirects light to the viewfinder, just like in a film camera. The shutter angle Illya was referring to is the "pie-portion" of a 360 degree circle which is open to allow light to the sensor during a full rotation.
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