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JVC, Sony, CMOS, CCD


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#1 Tavin Charapitak

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Posted 03 November 2007 - 11:25 PM

Hi there,
Does anyone know of the significant differences between CMOS and CCD chips?
Which is better? Or are they the same but just with different name?
Also any idea why JVC GY HD series only stop at 720p and not 1080?
And if you have $4000 would you buy the Sony HVR-Z1U/E or something else?

Thanx guys/girls.
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#2 John Mastrogiacomo

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Posted 04 November 2007 - 03:54 AM

Hi there,
Does anyone know of the significant differences between CMOS and CCD chips?
Which is better? Or are they the same but just with different name?
Also any idea why JVC GY HD series only stop at 720p and not 1080?
And if you have $4000 would you buy the Sony HVR-Z1U/E or something else?

Thanx guys/girls.

Do your homework first. A quick search at Google for "significant differences between CMOS and CCD chips" will yield most of the information you are looking for.

Also, do some research on the cameras you are thinking of buying and see which one is better for your situation.

You will get much better answers if you do your research first and then ask specific questions.

Good luck with your filmmaking!
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#3 anthony le grand

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Posted 04 November 2007 - 07:20 AM

Honestly I'm not a great fan of this camera and all the sony HD like A1 or Z1. For example, the canon HV20 is as good and much more cheaper, the only thing is that you're not very free for the settings (with sony neither anyway).
If you really want to try things and how to move a camera, direct actors and make films, just buy the cheapest one you will find and learn.
After that, it would be really better to spend a part of your 4000$ in a 16mm camera and to spend the rest to make test and after that, a film.
You will definitively see with a difference with any digital camera and your films will really look better if your learn how to use 16mm. It's day and night.
Or if you really want a digital one, to have correct pictures, you will at least need something like a P2 which are much more expensive than you asked for.
But if you really want to learn about light, film is the best, no doubt.
As you I'm pretty new, but when you will touch film, you will never want to go back to digital.....

Cheers
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#4 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 04 November 2007 - 07:39 AM

I assume you're comparing 720P with 1080i: the vertical resolution is pretty similar, to get an improvement you really need to go to 1080p. It was difficult enough at the time to get 720p on a 1/3" ccd camera, without the problem of going up to 1080p. There were some issues on the JVC cameras that have now been sorted.

As to which camera, you really need to decide what you want to use it for. There are a number of options on the market and everyone has their personal favourites. You also have to decide if you want to shoot interlace or progressive.
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