Jump to content


Photo

Camera Assistant Education


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 Lauren Beck

Lauren Beck

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 05 November 2007 - 02:41 PM

Hello everyone

This is my first time posting....I have been reading the threads for sometime....it is so informative and inspiring.

Here's my deal.
Started out as a stills photographer...love film...did not make the digital switch, although it is creeping in a bit. Still love the darkroom and the sound of a real film camera.

Decided I wanted to get involved in film and see my images moving. I was looking for a freelance skill to add to my photography and drink slinging and to get more involved in the technical side of filmaking. I ended up taking an editing course which led to an assistant editing gig...I have now been editing for 3 years. I have been working primarily on commercials. This has been a great experience on many levels and I have learned loads. This knowledge can only be helpful in the field.

I have been a camera assitant on a few HD shoots and have shot some behind the scenes footage for the clients we currently work with.

Now, I am dying to get out of the edit bay and shoot more. I am looking for a place that I can get my hands on the cameras, learn to load film, and hone my skills as a knowledgable AC. I have looked into the Maine workshops and am wondering if anyone has any thoughts on the AC workshop there or if anyone can suggest somewhere here in NY that I can get my hands (along with instruction) on the cameras so I can actually start persuing jobs.

I am willing to work for free but feel that a bit of a proper education regarding the cameras and loading can be helpful.

Any thoughts????
Would appreciate any response.

Thanks

Lauren
  • 0

#2 Chris Keth

Chris Keth
  • Sustaining Members
  • 4427 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • Los Angeles

Posted 05 November 2007 - 02:57 PM

Work at a rental house is hard to beat for the technical knowledge education. Other than that, try and find a loader gig and learn from the other ACs you work with.

Doug Hart's book has a lot of good procedural-type stuff for loading and working as an AC. I'd recommend that read.
  • 0

#3 Lauren Beck

Lauren Beck

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 05 November 2007 - 04:35 PM

Work at a rental house is hard to beat for the technical knowledge education. Other than that, try and find a loader gig and learn from the other ACs you work with.

Doug Hart's book has a lot of good procedural-type stuff for loading and working as an AC. I'd recommend that read.




thanks! do you think a workshop is worth it or the field is the way to go to for all the additional aspects of AC knowledge I need?

Lauren
  • 0

#4 Chris Keth

Chris Keth
  • Sustaining Members
  • 4427 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • Los Angeles

Posted 05 November 2007 - 07:49 PM

thanks! do you think a workshop is worth it or the field is the way to go to for all the additional aspects of AC knowledge I need?

Lauren


I went to the maine AC workshop but somebody else paid for it. I think you can learn everything you need about ACing by doing it and reading.
  • 0

#5 Michael Palm

Michael Palm
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 61 posts
  • Student
  • Kansas City, MO USA

Posted 08 November 2007 - 12:28 PM

I went to the maine AC workshop but somebody else paid for it. I think you can learn everything you need about ACing by doing it and reading.


I agree. I preparred myself for my first AC job by reading about the job and knowing the camera that I will be working with.
We were shooting on Viper and I read the manual before going out on the field... just so I had all the kinks worked out in my head.
  • 0

#6 Chris Keth

Chris Keth
  • Sustaining Members
  • 4427 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • Los Angeles

Posted 08 November 2007 - 04:46 PM

I agree. I preparred myself for my first AC job by reading about the job and knowing the camera that I will be working with.
We were shooting on Viper and I read the manual before going out on the field... just so I had all the kinks worked out in my head.


How is the viper to work with, anyway? I've never had the chance to even ahve my hands on one.
  • 0

#7 Michael Palm

Michael Palm
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 61 posts
  • Student
  • Kansas City, MO USA

Posted 09 November 2007 - 02:03 PM

How is the viper to work with, anyway? I've never had the chance to even ahve my hands on one.

I really enjoyed my time working with the Viper. Check out "Day Under Fire" on National Geographic. It airs 10/27/07 at 10p E. All footage shot in HD, most of it is Viper.
  • 0

#8 Ralph Keyser

Ralph Keyser
  • Sustaining Members
  • 120 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 19 November 2007 - 07:13 PM

A lot depends on how you learn. Some folks can read books and absorb and retain the information. Some folks need to be hands-on to really learn something. The working at a rental house route is a good one, and a great way to really learn the camera systems. I'd give the Maine workshops high marks as well, although it's not nearly long enough to really learn the job.
  • 0


CineTape

Opal

FJS International, LLC

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Wooden Camera

Glidecam

Broadcast Solutions Inc

The Slider

Aerial Filmworks

Paralinx LLC

CineLab

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Abel Cine

Technodolly

Metropolis Post

Tai Audio

Visual Products

Willys Widgets

rebotnix Technologies

Ritter Battery

Rig Wheels Passport

Visual Products

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Ritter Battery

Opal

Wooden Camera

Aerial Filmworks

FJS International, LLC

Abel Cine

Paralinx LLC

Glidecam

Metropolis Post

The Slider

CineTape

rebotnix Technologies

Tai Audio

Willys Widgets

Technodolly

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

CineLab

Rig Wheels Passport