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#1 Natalie Saito

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Posted 05 November 2007 - 09:59 PM

after transferring my HD film to DVD it now looks like DV. obviously there is compression when transferred to DVD but how can i minimize the decrease in image quality? would I have to take it to a facility? this goes for any HD cameras manufacturer but in this case i used Canon.

thanks a bunch!
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#2 Natalie Saito

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Posted 05 November 2007 - 10:43 PM

for every gig how much of it is compressed? DVD, quicktime, avi, mpeg, etc? thanks again!
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#3 Michael Nash

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Posted 05 November 2007 - 11:01 PM

Well a DVD is standard def, so I don't know what you were expecting. A prosumer HD camera is essentially just a prosumer SD camera with more pixels. Once you cut that extra resolution in downconversion you're back to... a prosumer SD camera.

There are lots of different ways to go about making a quality DVD with the best visual compression, so you'd probably have to ask more specific questions about the tools you're using (maybe in "editor's corner"). In general you should edit in the highest quality and resolution you can before outputting, and then select the best quality options when authoring the DVD to retain the most of what you started with.
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#4 Walter Graff

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Posted 05 November 2007 - 11:06 PM

First off, unless you keep your project in HD, it simply becomes SD. While you may gain slight bit originating in HD and making a DVD it is often nothing, once the process is done. Secondly the Hollywood movies you see on DVD use real time dedicated external encoders that cost a lot more and do a heck of a better job at transfer than you can. Often, it's the compression engine in your computer program that sucks. Just because say you use Final Cut, DVD studio pro, and some of the programs does not mean that each makes an equal quality DVD. The bottom line is that doing these things on a home computer simply can not make the best results. HD when down converted to SD is SD. The equation that 35mm looks good when transferred but HD does not its not a one to one comparison. More happens or should I say is locked into the 35mm version before it gets to DVD than your HD camera makes.
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#5 Natalie Saito

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Posted 05 November 2007 - 11:07 PM

Well a DVD is standard def, so I don't know what you were expecting. A prosumer HD camera is essentially just a prosumer SD camera with more pixels. Once you cut that extra resolution in downconversion you're back to... a prosumer SD camera.

There are lots of different ways to go about making a quality DVD with the best visual compression, so you'd probably have to ask more specific questions about the tools you're using (maybe in "editor's corner"). In general you should edit in the highest quality and resolution you can before outputting, and then select the best quality options when authoring the DVD to retain the most of what you started with.


final cut pro
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#6 Natalie Saito

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Posted 05 November 2007 - 11:21 PM

Thanks Walter! I was told that Da Vinci System is best but is very expensive. I guess HDVD or Blueray are the only ways to see maintain full resolution.
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#7 Walter Graff

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Posted 05 November 2007 - 11:25 PM

As long as they are connected to a large HD TV you will appreciate the picture quality more from a normal viewing distance.
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