Jump to content


Photo

The Naked Eye


  • Please log in to reply
13 replies to this topic

#1 Jayson Crothers

Jayson Crothers
  • Sustaining Members
  • 351 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, CA

Posted 06 November 2007 - 06:53 AM

I've got to learn to stop rambling so much........these are much longer than I anticipated.

WEEK TWO

My favorite work of the entire shoot was this week.

We started off the week shooting on the rooftop of the hotel we ended week one on. Since Oklahoma is so windy (and on the roof the wind could get as high as 35mph +), I couldn?t use any type of grip equipment up there ? the roof was painted white, so it basically became a giant bounce card. Since we keep favoring wider and wider shots, anything less than a 20K up there would have been ineffective and I wasn?t keen on making the crew try to get a 20K up the side of the building (there was only a small service stairway from the top floor to the roof). This day was a great example of using something like Sunpath and having a good relationship and communication with your first AD; our first AD is Katie Botkin ? she?s been a 2nd AD for a few years now and we?ve worked together on a lot of shows ? this is her first show as the first and she?s been doing a fantastic job. I planned out the shooting schedule based on the movement of the sun and told her that if we could shoot in a particular order and shoot certain scenes at certain times, I could wrap the day early and never need any equipment beyond a dolly and a bounce card. Sure enough, we used one bounce card and a doorway dolly and wrapped 4 hours early ? I kept the sun as a constant backlight and used the white roof as my bounce. We had great cloud formations in the morning and since the scenes were the only ones where our lead felt free from the dark interiors, I chose to use a Red 25 filter to make the contrast really snap. Most of this day was about composition and movement ? we shot a lot stuff that I was very happy with. The last shot of the day was suppose to a very wide shot that featured the sky in most of the composition ? unfortunately no clouds ever manifested themselves where we needed them, so the shot lacked much of the depth I was hoping for ? I?ve been finding that in B&W you really NEED clouds for day exteriors to give the sky any kind of definition ? otherwise it just becomes a big grey mass in frame.

Day 2 of the week was a bit of a disaster that was somehow turned into a victory for us. We had to shoot a series of inserts, an abstract seduction scene, and a 2-person basketball game. The gym we shot in had beautiful woodwork and texture, but was part of an abandoned school and was very dirty, so while we were shooting elsewhere there was a crew cleaning up the gym. I?d planned on doing the inserts while my grips were rigging things for the seduction scene (there was a complicated overhead shot and a very involved dolly shot) ? before I could get my first shot off, our generator went down on us. No problem ? we pulled out a putt-putt, swapped to some smaller units, and started shooting. The inserts took a while since I was limited by the putt-putt genny (the location had no power) and then we were into the seduction scene; thankfully the generator had been repaired at that point (or so I thought). This scene was basically 2 shots ? a wide overhead shot and a 360 degree dolly ? we had to shoot in a classroom at the abandoned school, and without a jib, we had to build a rig to mount the camera into the ceiling ? my Key Grip (who?s been a life saver on this show) used parts from a car mount to rig directly to support beams that were above the panel ceiling ? this let me get about 12? above the actors and do a wide shot on a 25mm lens; I lit from the side with a 5K and a small forest of flags (the director wanted the scene to be very contrasty, dark, and abstract). I got off 2 takes and the generator died again; so back to the putt-putt I went, only now I had to swap to a 2K (and go from a T8 to a T4). I got off one more take before we had to move-on (the genny going down and having to swap around chewed up a lot time because we had to re-light each time). The dolly involved our Doctor character moving around our lead and trying to peel away her clothes while she keeps pushing him away ? we?d originally palnned to shoot this in a very large space with high ceilings and I?d intended to use a series of 2K?s and 1K?s (8 total) on dimmers to keep the characters in backlight (dimming units up and down) as we circled around them. However, our small room and low ceilings didn?t allow for this, so instead my Key Grip built a 14? menace arm with a 2K that was then mounted to the dolly- as we moved around our characters, the light was moving with us and keeping them in constant backlight ? I was very happy with the effect and I?m actually grateful that we had to come up with this approach because it worked better than I think the dimming lights would have. Again, though, we lost time because we had to shoot with sound and the putt-putt couldn?t be used, so we ended up sitting around waiting for the genny to get up and running.

By the time we finally got the scene shot, there was no way to get the gym lit and shot as we had originally planned it ? the electrics had been busy with the genny problems, so nobody had been available to start pre-lighting. Fortunately this had been one of the locations I?d been able to do a proper tech scout at, so with a little help from Sunpath I was able to determine that we could use only the sun if we changed our shots and worked quickly ? the AD crew was great about quickly pulling everything together and with a little smoke I was able to get the shots we needed using just available light ? while I think the scene LOOKS better, I wish we could have lit it as originally planned to allow for more shots and more time to finess them ? as it was we were racing to get what we needed before we lost the light.

The next day was a lot of jumping around ? all available light, but we were spread out across three different places on a ranch that covered upwards of a thousand acres. The morning was spent doing a few sunrise scenes (to serve as sunset) that involved only a dolly and an 8x8 checkerboard; while these were being shot the grips were setting up for the scene I?ve been most worried about. There?s a 5 page dialogue scene that the director and I conceived as doing in one very long dolly shot ? it started off as an extremely wide shot of two charactes walking through a fairly dense forest and arguing ? as the argument turns to a more serious fight we start dollying to track with them as they move closer and closer until they end in a medium shot against a tree - then we dolly around them about 90 degrees to end in a CU on our lead talking to someone off-screen. While I?d been excited about the shot, I was also nervous at trying to pull off 5 pages in one very long shot that involved a lot of people hitting all of their cues correctly. It took a bit of time to work out the kinks, but in the end the shot worked out far better than I?d ever expected and it was one of my favorite shots of the movie thus far (and one of my favorite scenes). We ended the day on another 1-shot scene that starts very wide on 2 characters sitting on the hood of a car after witnessing a car accident and ending on a MS of one of them ? we had to start the move on the actual road, but the car was off to the side which dipped about 5 feet down from the road, so my grips had to build up all the track ? since we?d see the end of the track in shot I pulled the last stick and decided to hide a zoom during the dolly move; we shot at magic hour to have a very low hard light as a backlight and started the shot on a 30mm and ended on an 85mm.

The day following was a series of interiors in a very small room ? it was located on the second floor of a house, but had to stand-in as a first floor bedroom from a different exterior location. We couldn?t afford to rent any kind of a lift because we were so far away from anything (I was told the delivery charge would have been twice the actual rental charge), so my crew had to mount lights to the roof to get them in place ? this meant I was limited in where the lights could go, but because the interior was so small, there was literally no place to hide lights inside ? this was frustrating at times because it made things go slowly (setting a light on the roof took a long time to do safely), but I was happy because the limited space forced me to play things darker than I might have otherwise and I was happy with much of this day. The end of the day found me shooting a crucial scene after we?d lost the sunlight, so I was adding more and more lights at the last minute to try to blow out a curtain behind the actors in an effort to sell the illusion of daytime; again, I ran into the issue of the lens flaring more than I?d like, but overall I still think the shot worked.

The next day was also a little screwy because of the previous day ? the previous day had gone longer than expected, so to make our turnaround for the next day the call time had to be pushed back; the trouble with that was that the entire day was day exteriors and it was at a very distant location (about 2 ½ hours away), so our shooting time was already very limited. For the most part the day went well ? a lot of dolly work that was made difficult by very uneven ground, but my grips performed some more miracles with the rigs they came up with on the spot. We shot the closing shot of the film as well ? a long zoom (about 60 seconds) of the lead walking off into the wild ? we started as a wide shot on a 250mm and slowly zoomed all the way out to a 25mm; again the sky was virtually cloudless ? I ended up using an 85B to try to get the one cloud formation to pop a little more, and I also used an ND 3 Grad that was slowly slid into shot as we zoomed out ? it worked well at the end of the shot. One scene was a little screwy because the high hills surrounding the location made us lose direct sunlight for the final 2 shots; we used a 10K to give some direction to the ambient light.

The final day of this week was one of the toughest I?ve ever had ? it was our one night exterior and as soon as we arrived on location and started to unload we got hit by a giant storm; correction, TWO giant storms. We weren?t directly in their paths (one passed by us about 12 miles away and the other about 15 miles away), but they created some of the most intense winds I?ve ever stood in (at one point the weather report was saying around 45mph). We had to take all of our equipment down and wait for the storms to pass (at least we were audience to the most beautiful lightning storm I?ve ever seen ? at points it literally looked like daytime with how often and how bright the sky lit up). Since this was our last day with one of our actors, we decided to move the shooting order around and shoot a poor-man?s process driving scene first; I?d planned on setting it up while we were shooting our big wide shots, so now there was a little bit of a scramble ? on top of this, the director decided to do the whole scene in one shot and play it more theatrically and less realistic, so I had to make the gag sell for about 2 pages of dialogue. Luckily the wind helped sell the illusion quite a bit by blowing the actors hair around (and the dust flying by was free too!). Overall it looks fake, but in a good way that works within the story. We did a VERY wide shot of the lead walking down a long deserted highway ? I placed a 20K about a ¼ mile down the road and had it pointing straight back at the camera, but for a couple of reasons I wasn't able to get the light high enough to avoid a lens flare. To remedy this, we put a strip of gaffe tape across the matte box that was technically in frame, but since it?s so close to the lens we were focused past it and it served to darken the top of frame and eliminate the flare. Out of curisoisty, I also did a take without it and the horizon lit up a little like an alien spacecraft was landing ? an interesting look, but I preferred the darker version. The final shot of the evening was our lead stopping at the edge of town ? to fake the town we placed Christmas lights and various small units (inikies and tweenies) about a ¼ mile away pointed straight back at camera; I used a 135mm wide open to try to throw them completely out of focus ? the gag would have worked better with larger Christmas lights (the large clear globes are what I should have got versus the tiny lights).

Dailies have been looking good for the most part ? everyone is still in high spirits. I?m having real trouble with one member of the crew, but for a variety of political reasons my hands are tied to do anything about it; it?s frustrating because this person is hurting morale and slowing down the whole process, but it seems nothing can be done about it. It?s personally upsetting too because I?ve worked with this person before and never encountered this ? I suggested them for the job, so to a certain extent it?s also reflecting on me. We?re only a week away from being done, so at this point it?s a matter of grinning and baring it.

WEEK 3

***I still haven?t seen dailies from this last week***

The first two days were tedious ? we shot in a motel room; an 11? by 10? white walled room. All of the scenes were heavy dialogue and the director wanted more minimalist set dressing, so I had nothing on the walls and virtually no furniture other than a bed, a small table, and two chairs. I ended up blasting a 20K through the one window and using a lot of negative fill to try to create contrast. For the most part I think I was successful (as successful as one can be when you?re shooting in a white box and doing long dialogue scenes in a static wide shot). I was grateful for the few day exteriors we had to do if only to get out of the tiny room ? there was some fun architecture and mirrored windows at the front lobby that I used to create some interesting compositions.

The last four days were spent in a bar ? the toughest part of this location was that we were shooting from 2am to 2pm, so everyone was tired and that made everything run slowly. I?d originally wanted to use dedo-lights in this location, but since there?s no rental house within about 300 miles and by the time we got to these last four days there was no budget to ship them in, I elected to try to use par cans mounted above the drop ceiling. On day one we discovered that the bar was in BAD disrepair ? most of the ceiling was being held up by dried spray paint and some bailing wire (no joke), so we quickly abandoned mounting any lights and instead elected to hang 100 watt MR-16?s on thin wires to create sourcey pools of light that would appear in frame ? it made the bar look a bit more ritzy than intended, but we were out of options and the spirit of our original idea was still there.

Most of the bar had to be lit from above, so we carefully placed small units in the few places my Key Grip felt safe about ? tweenies were mostly used, and I used a lot of inkies on the ground to create up-lighting on walls in the background to create separation. The work here was tedious because the bar became about lighting with almost exclusively separation rather than lighting in the traditional sense (does that make any sense?) ? since I couldn?t do a lot to light the bar as I would have liked to, I used a lot more lights than I normally do to try and create layers and silhouettes. In the end I think it worked, but it just took a lot more work than I?d originally anticipated. I used a little atmosphere here and there, but with our multiple backlights I found that even a little smoke felt like too much. The real life-saver in this location were the 100 watt MR-16?s; they had Edison bases, so we could screw them into overhead practials and get hot pools of light that fell off quickly. The surprise came on our last day when we wrapped about 4 hours early ? despite losing about a day and half up front, we still managed to wrap up early; I can?t stress how good the AD crew was on the shoot.

In the end I can say I?m happy with most of the work ? I?m unhappy with a number of the locations that were selected because I really think location and production design make up at least 60% of good photography. I really enjoyed shooting black and white (and after seeing it for the past few weeks I can say there?s a marked difference in actual B&W versus color turned B&W) ? I wish I?d had more time to shoot more tests because I feel like the first 2 days of the shoot were a little experimental for me and I hate that it took me those 2 days to learn a few important lessons. My camera crew (1st AC David Levine and 2nd AC Brian Mohr) were fantastic ? not one soft shot in the entire film and everything was smooth sailing from start to finish. My Key grip Felipe Pena was a rock star every day ? nothing was impossible and he was inventive and fast. Ravi Gahunia (BB Grip), Xavier Leuvano (BB Electric), and Jarrod Wilson (Gaffer) also went above and beyond.

I?m still impressed by how much we did with so little, but I also wish I could find a better way to explain to people that the most valuable resource on set (and the one that you should spend the most money on) is people, not equipment. We shot a Super 35 feature on location for about $150,000, but we could have made a much better movie (in my opinion) by shooting on Super 16 or even HD and spending more money on hiring more crew ? of course the movie would look different, but in the end it?s about making a better movie and not simply about it looking pretty.

I?m getting tired of working with directors who don?t feel the need to do a shot-list; there are a few who can pull this off, but usually it just feels lazy to me and it leads to being less productive on set (and later on you wake up in the middle of the night thinking ?Damn, I wish I?d thought to do it THAT way instead???); in the future I?m going to insist that a director work on thinking through what they want in advance because it?s not a viable working method on low budgets to make it up as you go along. I also learned to be more careful about who I hire or suggest for hiring ? I rarely have ever run into a personnel issue on my shoots, but one person on this show really turned on me (so to speak) and it affected everyone I think; unfortunately the politics surrounding this person made it impossible to solve the issue without creating a host of other issues. Lesson learned.

This was my ninth feature (all of them have been very low budget) and the thing I?m realizing I?ve learned the most is how to make informed decisions fast ? I?m proud and happy with the solutions we came up with on the shoot to solve some unique problems. What I?m not happy with is that on low budget productions like this I keep running into the same issues over and over and they seem to be a common issue no matter who?s running the show. In the future I?ll start pushing more for the things I know are going to be really important ? I think my issue now is that I try very hard to be the guy who?s always positive and works hard to find a solution (I never want anyone to hear me say ?No?) ? I think I need to start being more honest about things and saying ?That?s not a good way to do this and will hurt us down the road, but here?s an option??? AND be able to push for it until the production gets it, rather than saying ?Oh. Um. Yeah. We?ll figure out how to do that.?

The first shot we did on the hospital roof - that's just the sun and a Red 25 on the camera - while the rising sun was beautiful, we were still an hour or so too early for any clouds, so this shot is somewhat void of definition in the sky.
NE___Roof_CU.jpg

Later in the day we had about 40 minutes of an amazing cloud formation that worked quite well for our scene.
NE___Roof_with_Clouds.jpg

Day 2 - This was the first thing we shot - I was using an 85B to try to make the clouds pop a bit more (there wasn't much there to begin with); since the shot was already rather contrasty (the tree line on the right was quite dark) I didn't want to use a Red 25.
NE___Road_WS.jpg

This was shot about 30 minutes later and the sky was totally bare - the weather in the panhandle changed faster than I'd have guessed.
NE___Road_High_Angle.jpg

Grabs from the long dolly shot - it actually begins MUCH wider than the first one (that first one is about 3/5 of the way into the scene), but without the movement of the characters they are diffiuclt to see in a still frame. The one variable in each shot was that clouds kept rolling through the shot, so we'd go from high contrast to very flat, then back to high contrast - a couple of takes I was riding the iris a little to make the shot work, but for the most part I let it go because I was liking how the lighting was changing as a reflection of how the characters are changing and fighting.
NE___Forest_1.jpg
NE___Forest_2.jpg
NE___Forest_3.jpg

The beginning of this shot is on a 30mm and I dollied forward on about 20' of track as I also zoomed in to end on an 85mm. They're being filled in with an 8x8 Checkboard, but upon hindsight I might have backed it off a little and played it a little darker.
NE__Road_Side_WS_1.jpg
NE___Road_Side_MS_2.jpg

One of the insert shots I did for a montage - it's a series of shots of our lead getting an examination. I had an idea of her lying down and seeing a beam of light (like a cat-scan) move across her. There's a tweenie into the ceiling above her that's reading about 4 stops under key. The beam of light is from a 50 degree source 4 (about 2 1/2 stops over key) that's mounted on our gear head so I could smootly control the tilt and movement of the beam.
NE___Cat_Scan.jpg

Our overhead shot - a 25mm about 12' high; this is lit with a 5K and an army of flags. It's exposed at a T8 and she's at Key; the dark side didn't even read.
NE___Overhead_High_Con.jpg

This is the end of our 360 degree doilly track - imagine the entire shot looking like this. The backlight mounted to the dolly via a menace arm kept the whole scene very moody and worked great.
NE___End_of_Dolly.jpg

One of the few gym shots we could get - we added a lot of atmosphere to the room (in hindsight, too much, but we were all running in a mad dash to get the shots before the sun vanished). This is all available light - my grips removed a window panel in the upper portion of this frame to help give me a primary beam of light to work around, but other than that we didn't do anything else to the lighting.
NE___Gym.jpg

Our small bedroom interior - the only light inside the room is a Source 4 that's creating the light on the left wall - outside the window they're in front of is a 10K and a 5K.
NE___Bedroom_Silhouette.jpg

To get this I pulled open the bedroom curtains and used the 10K as a single hard source.
NE___Bedroom_with_Gun.jpg

This is primarily lit only be our 20K - since I could only get the 20K into one position safely, I had to work certain things around it. In this case, I moved the bed so that the cuts of light on the wall behind her are naturally created from the headboard of the bed. A curtain on the window helped create a soft key for the lead.
NE___Bedroom_on_Bed.jpg

The sun was gone at this point - in addition to the 10K and 5K outside the window, I also used 2 2K's and 2 Par 64's to blow out the curtain. Inside they're both being lit by a Source 4 into a 4x4 beadboard off to the right.
NE___Mystery_Man_is_Shot___Bedroom.jpg

The final shot of the movie as our lead walks away - again, there were almost no clouds, but we didn't have the time to wait or to re-schedule it. It's a T8 1/3, starting on a 250mm and zooming all the way out to 25mm as she walks away. I slid an ND 3 grad filter in from the top of the shot to help try to get the ckouds at the end.
NE___End_1.jpg
NE___End_2.jpg
NE___End_3.jpg

I liked this location a lot - endless possibilities for composition. There's a 10K on the pin edging them both (it's very subtle with all of the sunlight).
NE__Mystery_Man_on_Porch.jpg

We only got 2 takes of this - one was with natural sunlight and the next one was a fabrication with me using bounce cards and a 10K.
NE___Porch_Gun_Shot.jpg

This is part of our opening sequence - nothing more than a 20K pointed back at the lens (there's a Par Can off to screen right that's barely lighting her). The top frame has a strip of tape across the top of the frame to remove the flare, but the bottom frame is a clean lens.
NE___Road_WS_at_Nite.jpg
NE___Road_WS___2.jpg

This is our fake city skyline (well, one of the many we created) - the christmas lights don't play much, but the inkies and tweenies pointed back at camera were convincing. She's being keyed with a 5K and a 2K cross-lighting her.
NE___Fake_City_Lights.jpg
  • 0

#2 David Mullen ASC

David Mullen ASC
  • Sustaining Members
  • 19769 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 06 November 2007 - 12:05 PM

Really great stuff!

Unfortunately, the problems of ill-prepared directors, problematic crew members, making adjustments after seeing the first few days' worth of dailies, etc. -- never go away!

Every shoot is its own set of problems and it seems there is always a few weak links in the chain, crew or department-wise. And every director is different.
  • 0

#3 Toby L Edwards

Toby L Edwards
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 143 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Phoenix, Arizona

Posted 06 November 2007 - 01:38 PM

Jason'
This stuff looks amazing. Nothing better than some nice gritty low key B/W Film.
Thank you very much for such a detailed descriptions of your set ups. I really like the shot of the lead(guy) sitting on the car. Did you use the 85B or the Red25 for that shot?
Toby
  • 0

#4 Stephen Murphy

Stephen Murphy
  • Guests

Posted 06 November 2007 - 02:14 PM

Looks great dude
  • 0

#5 Chris Keth

Chris Keth
  • Sustaining Members
  • 4427 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • Los Angeles

Posted 06 November 2007 - 02:17 PM

There's some really beautiful work there, Jason. I think we're all a bit jealous since the opportunity to shoot a B&W feature is so rare. That long dolly in the woods sounds great. I hope one of those worked out just right wit the sun and clouds for you.
  • 0

#6 Saul Rodgar

Saul Rodgar
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1682 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 06 November 2007 - 02:44 PM

Hi, was this Hallie's movie? I can't remember her last name, but last year I spoke on the phone with a woman named Hallie who was going to make a feature film in Ok -where she is from- in B/W. Reading your posts I gather the director is a woman from one sentence - you refer to the director as a she- but you don't give her name anywhere that I can find. This project sounds too close to what she described to me to be coincidence.

[quote name='Jayson Crothers' date='Nov 6 2007, 04:53 AM' post='202254']

"I?m still impressed by how much we did with so little, but I also wish I could find a better way to explain to people that the most valuable resource on set (and the one that you should spend the most money on) is people, not equipment. We shot a Super 35 feature on location for about $150,000, but we could have made a much better movie (in my opinion) by shooting on Super 16 or even HD and spending more money on hiring more crew ? of course the movie would look different, but in the end it?s about making a better movie and not simply about it looking pretty."

Did you ever think about shooting 2 perf 35mm film? Good old Techniscope revival. 2.35 :1 aspect ratio using spherical lenses with significant film savings and longer running mags sound like you could have benefited from. Just a thought.
  • 0

#7 Max Jacoby

Max Jacoby
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2955 posts
  • Other

Posted 06 November 2007 - 05:07 PM

Looks great Jason.
  • 0

#8 Chayse Irvin

Chayse Irvin
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 409 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, CA

Posted 06 November 2007 - 06:58 PM

So hott. My screen is on fire.
  • 0

#9 Mike Williamson

Mike Williamson
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 534 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 07 November 2007 - 01:42 AM

Very beautiful, Jason, thanks for posting the stills. I think the leading actress has a really great face, interesting and attractive, plus you did a nice job lighting her. Looking forwards to seeing this at some point, hope it does well for you!
  • 0

#10 Jayson Crothers

Jayson Crothers
  • Sustaining Members
  • 351 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, CA

Posted 07 November 2007 - 06:23 AM

Thanks for all of the great feedback - it's very much appreciated.

David - I expect there to always be some issue(s) to work out, but it seems that the lower the budget the more ill-prepared (and knowingly ill-prepared) some of the directors are, etc. I rarely have had crew issues, and while the look of the film should elvolve a bit as you start actually shooting it, I was referring more to my desire to shoot better tests so as to fine tune technical details - that way the adjustments are more style and story changes rather than technical things.

Toby - The shot of the man on the hood was done using an 85B- since there were no clouds in the sky (and since it was sunset and the light was already falling when we got to shooting it) I elected not to use a Red 25,

Saulie - Yes, this was Hally. She was fun to work with (very easy-going), but not necessarily well-prepared in terms of knowing how she wanted to approach each scene. I had so many issues trying to track down a 3-perf camera that I never considered 2-perf.

Mike - Yeah - she had a stunning face to light (her face loved the hard frontal light about 2 feet above eye line, or a VERY soft sidelight -exactly 90 degrees), but it was also particular.
  • 0

#11 Saul Rodgar

Saul Rodgar
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1682 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 07 November 2007 - 05:24 PM

[quote name='Jayson Crothers' date='Nov 7

Saulie - Yes, this was Hally. She was fun to work with (very easy-going), but not necessarily well-prepared in terms of knowing how she wanted to approach each scene. I had so many issues trying to track down a 3-perf camera that I never considered 2-perf.


[/quote]


It looks great! I am glad she finally did that project and it looks so good!

S
  • 0

#12 David Mullen ASC

David Mullen ASC
  • Sustaining Members
  • 19769 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 07 November 2007 - 11:26 PM

I didn't put two+two together until now... I know Hally Grounds. In fact, she contacted me about "Naked Eye" last January. We made a b&w 35mm short film in Acapulco years ago (she produced and acted in it) -- unfortunately the production was somewhat cursed and after getting a mediocre b&w workprint from the lab, we never saw the negative again because the lab bill went unpaid for years. Then the lab went out of business. Too bad because I shot a few nice shots of cliffdivers in b&w 35mm, in slow-motion.

I'm glad she got ahold of such a talented DP, just the right fit for her project.
  • 0

#13 Matt Workman

Matt Workman
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 421 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • NYC

Posted 08 November 2007 - 01:37 AM

Small world.

The stills look really great. Very impressed. Are you going to be able to post some footage also?

Edited by Matt Workman, 08 November 2007 - 01:38 AM.

  • 0

#14 Saul Rodgar

Saul Rodgar
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1682 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 08 November 2007 - 02:36 AM

I didn't put two+two together until now... I know Hally Grounds. In fact, she contacted me about "Naked Eye" last January. We made a b&w 35mm short film in Acapulco years ago (she produced and acted in it) -- unfortunately the production was somewhat cursed and after getting a mediocre b&w workprint from the lab, we never saw the negative again because the lab bill went unpaid for years. Then the lab went out of business. Too bad because I shot a few nice shots of cliffdivers in b&w 35mm, in slow-motion.

I'm glad she got ahold of such a talented DP, just the right fit for her project.



Hally Grounds, that's her name. Last year I sent her my B/W demo reel. I met someone who was going to produce her project -I never heard the name, by the way- but eventually coulnd't and she suggested I give Hally a copy of my stuff. Then Hally called and said she had liked what she saw, but that she wanted David to shoot it, whom she had worked with before. She said she would keep me posted but I obviously considered myself out of the race right there and then . . .

It was funny (or it's funny now), actually, because she said that "Northfork" was shot on B/W when I knew it wasn't. And she got a little piqued when I said so. (Maybe it is all that desaturated, Fuji-stock look . . .) Not wanting to start off with the wrong foot, I just politely said maybe I didn't remember correctly. Then she went on to assert that lighting for 35mm is TOTALLY different than lighting for 16/ s16mm/ HD, which is what I shoot mostly. I didn't argue anymore but thought she wouldn't be easy to work with at all. I am glad to hear from Jayson that wasn't the case - for him. So I was actually relieved to be "disqualified" from the project from that one converstion I had with her. She came across as "my way or the highway." Never talked to her again, and I assumed that David would shoot Naked Eye eventually. Then I lost track of the whole deal since our mutual would-be-producer friend said she wasn't getting involved due to scheduling conflicts. Until I saw Jayson's last post and started suspecting right away. It was the B/W Oklahoma thing, I guess . . .

Like David, I am glad she found Jayson, who did a helluva job from what I can see, and had fun doing so!
  • 0


Technodolly

CineTape

rebotnix Technologies

Opal

Visual Products

Aerial Filmworks

FJS International, LLC

Rig Wheels Passport

Wooden Camera

Tai Audio

Abel Cine

Ritter Battery

The Slider

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Willys Widgets

CineLab

Metropolis Post

Glidecam

Paralinx LLC

Paralinx LLC

Aerial Filmworks

Visual Products

Abel Cine

CineTape

Metropolis Post

The Slider

Tai Audio

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Ritter Battery

Glidecam

FJS International, LLC

Rig Wheels Passport

Technodolly

Willys Widgets

CineLab

rebotnix Technologies

Opal

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Wooden Camera

Broadcast Solutions Inc