Jump to content


Photo

Film Stock Preservation and Temperature


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 Mackay Valentine

Mackay Valentine
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 11 posts
  • 2nd Assistant Camera
  • Burbank, CA

Posted 07 November 2007 - 01:16 AM

Hi, I recently was given 7000+ feet of Kodak 5218 short-ends that have been in a friend of mine?s closet for over a year. The closet is relatively cool year-round, probably never reaching above 70º, but I?ve heard that film stocks should be refriderated if kept for long periods of time. Will not refridgerating this stock have any adverse effects? Or will they be okay?
  • 0

#2 Nick Mulder

Nick Mulder
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1023 posts
  • Other
  • Auckland, New Zealand

Posted 07 November 2007 - 05:46 AM

you can get color shift.

Best to get a bit of it 'snip' or 'wedge' tested at a lab - it doesn't cost an arm and a leg ... ask them to explain the results ;)
  • 0

#3 Dan Goulder

Dan Goulder
  • Sustaining Members
  • 1259 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 07 November 2007 - 01:04 PM

Hi, I recently was given 7000+ feet of Kodak 5218 short-ends that have been in a friend of mine?s closet for over a year. The closet is relatively cool year-round, probably never reaching above 70º, but I?ve heard that film stocks should be refriderated if kept for long periods of time. Will not refridgerating this stock have any adverse effects? Or will they be okay?

The people who sell film will tell you it's probably too old. This may or may not be true. If you get a chance to try out some of this stock, please share the results with us, as many of us do end up with excess stock which is stored under similar circumstances, always wondering when exactly that stock will cross the threshold of usability...
  • 0

#4 K Borowski

K Borowski
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 3905 posts
  • Camera Operator
  • I.A.T.S.E. Local # 600 Eastern Region

Posted 08 November 2007 - 03:22 PM

I don't have the applicable link to the Kodak website, as John Pytlak would have, but there's definitely an article somewhere on Kodak.com that gives you the best temperature and humidity conditions for rawstock. I've heard the 50/50 rule is good. 50 degrees Fahrenheit (~10C) and 50% relative humidity works well for extended storage. Storage of longer than a couple of months, over a year, you'd probably want to freeze the film, as long as you can keep humidity arond 50%. If MP film gets too dry there are issues.

~KB
  • 0

#5 Henri Titchen

Henri Titchen
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 125 posts
  • Other

Posted 09 November 2007 - 05:05 AM

Here is the link to the Kodak website section on film storage. Click on the headings to see the full information
on each topic.

http://www.kodak.com.../...53.12&lc=en

Henry.

I don't have the applicable link to the Kodak website, as John Pytlak would have, but there's definitely an article somewhere on Kodak.com that gives you the best temperature and humidity conditions for rawstock. I've heard the 50/50 rule is good. 50 degrees Fahrenheit (~10C) and 50% relative humidity works well for extended storage. Storage of longer than a couple of months, over a year, you'd probably want to freeze the film, as long as you can keep humidity arond 50%. If MP film gets too dry there are issues.

~KB


  • 0

#6 Matthew Buick

Matthew Buick
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2345 posts
  • Student
  • Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.

Posted 09 November 2007 - 06:31 PM

How would one go about monitoring a film's humitity when it's just stored in a home freezer?
  • 0

#7 Henri Titchen

Henri Titchen
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 125 posts
  • Other

Posted 10 November 2007 - 03:05 PM

Monitoring humidity can be carried out with an inexpensive datalogger such as the Dallas/Maxim i-button. I have used these and they work very well. It is easy to see the temperature and humidity cycles inside a frost free domestic freezer using these. The electronic datalogger is the size of a large button cell battery!

See the following link.
http://www.maxim-ic.....cfm/qv_pk/4379

How would one go about monitoring a film's humitity when it's just stored in a home freezer?


  • 0


The Slider

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Visual Products

rebotnix Technologies

Technodolly

Opal

Glidecam

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Ritter Battery

Abel Cine

Tai Audio

FJS International, LLC

Willys Widgets

Rig Wheels Passport

CineLab

CineTape

Aerial Filmworks

Wooden Camera

Metropolis Post

Paralinx LLC

Technodolly

The Slider

Broadcast Solutions Inc

CineTape

Tai Audio

Glidecam

Aerial Filmworks

Willys Widgets

rebotnix Technologies

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

CineLab

Wooden Camera

Opal

FJS International, LLC

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Metropolis Post

Paralinx LLC

Rig Wheels Passport

Visual Products

Abel Cine

Ritter Battery