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camera tests at checkout


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#1 Matteo Cocco

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Posted 08 November 2007 - 05:55 PM

would like to know exactly what tests do you normally do for a 35mm camera (i mean such as focus, etc..)
thanks,
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#2 Chris Keth

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Posted 08 November 2007 - 06:19 PM

would like to know exactly what tests do you normally do for a 35mm camera (i mean such as focus, etc..)
thanks,


This is kind of a shortened list, but:

Build the camera and make sure everything that needs to work works.

Check that all the aks fit, et cetera.

Make sure you have all of the cable you'll need.

Check all your batteries.

Scratch test each of the magazines and check that the footage counter and light seals on each is good. Make sure they lock tight and attach to the body tight.

Check each lens to make sure the distance scale is on the money.

For zooms see that the focus holds throughout the zoom range and that it tracks straight.

A registration test is always a good idea.

Shoot a framing chart.
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#3 Matt Kelly

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Posted 16 November 2007 - 03:48 AM

flange depth kit!!! (you never know.... i've seen it off multiple times in prep)

extra fuses

backup cables (important!)

focal plane shutter timing test. (you can draw a squigly line on some film and inch it through the gate while looking through the lens port.) shouldn't really ever be off, but can on older cameras where the shutter gears off the movement, and the person who serviced it last didn't line up the gears correctly when puitting it back together. sync of the mirror also... it shouldn't block any part of the negative before the shutter closes. (seen this once on a butterfly vistavision)
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#4 Matt Kelly

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Posted 16 November 2007 - 04:10 AM

(derh... it timed out....new post)

correct ground glass for project format

for lenses, other than the regular taping out, make sure that you don't have any problems with matte-box/donut combinations for any of them. This just means, make sure they all fit in a way that makes sense, make sure you have correct bellows/whatever attachments for any one that has a different diameter, and make sure nothing vignettes at the widest with everything you need in front.

for zooms, the focus holding through the zoom range is important, but also make sure that when zooming in and out, the image doesn't dance around vertically/horizontally. Worn races in older zooms can go unnoticed. also really excessive "breathing" when focusing could be worth mentioning, if the DP doesn't already know.

dont be afraid to ask your tech about throwing the lenses up on a projector... and then ask about red and green fringe bias, which i don't completely understand still... :P

And i'd say the #1 forgetten items i've seen are power extension and remote run cables (just in case)
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#5 Chris Keth

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Posted 16 November 2007 - 12:47 PM

That's a pretty good list. You need a second any time soon? I could learn stuff from you... :lol:
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#6 Michael Nash

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Posted 16 November 2007 - 05:18 PM

There are entire books on the subject:

http://www.amazon.co...d/dp/0240804015

http://www.amazon.co...27/ref=pd_sim_b
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#7 Chris Keth

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Posted 17 November 2007 - 01:42 AM

There are entire books on the subject:

http://www.amazon.co...d/dp/0240804015

http://www.amazon.co...27/ref=pd_sim_b


Thanks, Michael. I have and have read both. I just like meeting new assistants (and people in general) I can learn from.
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#8 Michael Nash

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Posted 17 November 2007 - 03:07 AM

Thanks, Michael. I have and have read both. I just like meeting new assistants (and people in general) I can learn from.


That was meant more for the original poster. As I'm sure you know, there's more to a camera prep than can be covered in a few posts!
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#9 Chris Keth

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Posted 17 November 2007 - 07:16 PM

That was meant more for the original poster. As I'm sure you know, there's more to a camera prep than can be covered in a few posts!


Oh, absolutely. There's a couple things to remember. I actually take one of those books with me to use as a checklist.
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#10 Travis Cline

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Posted 20 November 2007 - 04:40 PM

If you have the time and budget I would shoot something to check your lenses. On the last feature I shot we did not shoot anything on our lenses and I am seeing problems now. In our case the resolution of one of our lenses was not sharp around the edges and it was only made worse by shooting super 35. Anyway, could have been avoided in prep. Its not the AC's fault, my AC's are very thorough, but I should have pushed more to have the budget necessary for them to shoot more tests. It is especially noticeable when shown on a print.

Travis

Edited by Travis Cline, 20 November 2007 - 04:41 PM.

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#11 Chris Keth

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Posted 20 November 2007 - 06:30 PM

I've noticed a lot of projects aren't actually shooting and projecting tests anymore. It seems like a bad gamble to me.
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#12 Matt Kelly

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Posted 20 November 2007 - 11:05 PM

Well I dont REALLY think it's very necessary to test shoot anything other than a framing chart and reg test... looking at lenses on a projector can tell you about everything you need to know as far as contrast/resolution is concerned. Most rental houses will let assistants do that, right?
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The Slider

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Technodolly

Paralinx LLC

Aerial Filmworks

Opal

Rig Wheels Passport

CineLab

Visual Products