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Melting Point of Kodak 7266?


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#1 Jonathan Taee

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Posted 08 November 2007 - 08:47 PM

Hello,

I am planning on playing with film by heating it up and adding different chemicals and dyes. Does anyone know the melting temperature for kodak 7266 or any other 16mm stock. I want to gently heat it to its maximum, but not fuse the film together.

Cheers,
Jonathan Taee
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#2 Robert Hughes

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Posted 16 November 2007 - 12:58 PM

Melting point for the emulsion or the base? When processing, the emulsion starts flaking off if you run your chemicals over 85 degrees Fahrenheit. The base is cellulose acetate, which melts at several hundred degrees.
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#3 Jonathan Taee

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Posted 21 November 2007 - 06:19 PM

Melting point for the emulsion or the base? When processing, the emulsion starts flaking off if you run your chemicals over 85 degrees Fahrenheit. The base is cellulose acetate, which melts at several hundred degrees.


Thanks for the response. I was beginning to think no one out there would have an answer.

I don't want to loose the image. I just want to increase the contrast and grain. Or see any of the other effects heating the film might have. I plan on shooting the 16mm film, cooking it, then processing it. What happens if I keep reheating it a few times, keeping it under 85 degrees F? If the emulsion flakes off will the image still be visible? I'm thinking not.

Cheers,
Jonathan Taee
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#4 Dominic Case

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Posted 21 November 2007 - 06:42 PM

If you run the film from one temperature to another too quickly - eg develop at 85F, stop bath at 75F - the emulsion will reticulate, as it swells and shrinks (much more than the base) and cracks up like crazy paving.

You would increase the contrast and grain by simply increasing dev temperature OR dev time. No need to go beyond the limit of temperature or risk the emulsion reticuating or flaking off. Just develop for longer.
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#5 Zamir Merali

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Posted 26 November 2007 - 12:06 AM

If the emulsion flakes off will the image still be visible? I'm thinking not.

Cheers,
Jonathan Taee


That's sort of like asking, "If I scrape all the blue paint off my car, will my car still be blue?"
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