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Best stock for going B&W in DI?


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#1 XiaoSu Han

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Posted 09 November 2007 - 07:35 PM

Hi!

we are shooting an advertisement for TV on s16 and are going to take it to B&W in DI!

now i've got a few questions, i hope someone could take a few minutes to share his experience with me!


1) which stock is suitable for DI B&W? should i take tungsten stock for tungsten lighting and daylight stock for daylight or is it not really an issue if im going b&w anyways?

2) i wanted to pull a 500 iso stock to 320 to get out some grain, is that possible? how's the effect? the contrast will be less too wouldnt it be?

3) should i use filters like red green and orange already or is it better to grade via DI?

thanks in advance for any information!

ps: at the lab they are saying something like "take whatever stock you want, we are applying blurring filters for tv anyways and it will all look the same" duh?

pps: we are doing a few tests on monday, how shall we test? expose at key, 3 stops under, 3 stops over? somethiing special?

i am looking forward to any information available!

regards from vienna
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#2 Chris Keth

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Posted 09 November 2007 - 08:31 PM

Hi!
1) which stock is suitable for DI B&W? should i take tungsten stock for tungsten lighting and daylight stock for daylight or is it not really an issue if im going b&w anyways?

2) i wanted to pull a 500 iso stock to 320 to get out some grain, is that possible? how's the effect? the contrast will be less too wouldnt it be?

3) should i use filters like red green and orange already or is it better to grade via DI?


Any stock will desaturate completely in post. What you might want to look for is a stock that fits the speed you want and had grain characteristics you want. For a finer grained fast film, you might look to eterna 500T. To reduce grain further you could pull like you mention, but it will reduce contrast like you surmise. I would prefer to simply overexpose it a bit (I like a half stop, usually) and print it down. That will hold the contrast and tighten up the grain.

Filters designed for black and white won't do the same thing if you're just desaturating in post. They will have the same effect if you're doing something like using channel mixer in photoshop. I don't know if this is possible in telecine or not. That would be a lab question.

If you're positive you want B&W, why not shoot a B&W stock? Check out the "in production" forum. There are a few production diary posts about a film called "The Naked Eye" with some beautiful B&W work.
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#3 XiaoSu Han

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Posted 09 November 2007 - 08:58 PM

Any stock will desaturate completely in post. What you might want to look for is a stock that fits the speed you want and had grain characteristics you want. For a finer grained fast film, you might look to eterna 500T. To reduce grain further you could pull like you mention, but it will reduce contrast like you surmise. I would prefer to simply overexpose it a bit (I like a half stop, usually) and print it down. That will hold the contrast and tighten up the grain.

Filters designed for black and white won't do the same thing if you're just desaturating in post. They will have the same effect if you're doing something like using channel mixer in photoshop. I don't know if this is possible in telecine or not. That would be a lab question.

If you're positive you want B&W, why not shoot a B&W stock? Check out the "in production" forum. There are a few production diary posts about a film called "The Naked Eye" with some beautiful B&W work.


thanks for the quick response, we have a roll of eterna 500t to test, i will overexpose that and try printing it down!

the footage from "the naked eye" looks awesome, but the problem is that we need the 500 asa film because of a location which we can only shoot with available light... there's another scene (which we can light) which we want to have with low contrast and virtually no grain, so pulling a 250d stock or using the 64d would be the best i think


thanks again, regards, xax

Edited by XiaoSu Han, 09 November 2007 - 09:00 PM.

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Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

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Aerial Filmworks

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Visual Products

The Slider

FJS International, LLC

Glidecam

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Paralinx LLC

CineTape

Wooden Camera

Metropolis Post

Abel Cine

CineLab