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7205 pull process


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#1 Daniel Carruthers

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Posted 10 November 2007 - 12:27 PM

Hi Im in the early stages of pre-prodution on I short film.
And Im thinking of shooting 7205 250D. Though Im not yet set on this stock because its still a few months away before I shoot.
So if its the spring time I might go with 50D instead
But my question is I want a soft low contrast look. The film takes place outside around a forrest and lake.
And I want to shoot around sunrise and sunset for a warm look.
So if I rate the 250 stock for 200 and tell the lab to pull process by half a stop will that give the look I want?
I dont have the money to do any tests, and will a pull process of half a stop make a big difference? I mean would it be better to overexpose by a full stop and then pull by a full stop for a less contrasty look?
And will this help eliminate grain or will I get more grain?
And is pull processing more expensive then just normal processing??

thanks
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 10 November 2007 - 06:41 PM

I dont have the money to do any tests, and will a pull process of half a stop make a big difference? I mean would it be better to overexpose by a full stop and then pull by a full stop for a less contrasty look?
And will this help eliminate grain or will I get more grain?
And is pull processing more expensive then just normal processing??

thanks


Yes, I'd overexpose a full stop and pull-process a full stop in order to see much of a difference. It should reduce visible graininess, due to the overexposure more than due to the pull-processing.

Yes, labs charge more for pull-processing.
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#3 Daniel Carruthers

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Posted 10 November 2007 - 06:59 PM

Yes, I'd overexpose a full stop and pull-process a full stop in order to see much of a difference. It should reduce visible graininess, due to the overexposure more than due to the pull-processing.

Yes, labs charge more for pull-processing.



Thanks I think maybe I'll do that then.
Also if I over expose and print down will that give a softer less contrasty look, or would it do the opposite?
And is printing down done by the lab or done in the telcine?
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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 10 November 2007 - 07:39 PM

Thanks I think maybe I'll do that then.
Also if I over expose and print down will that give a softer less contrasty look, or would it do the opposite?
And is printing down done by the lab or done in the telcine?


It's printing "down" if you make a print using higher printer light numbers to correct for a denser than normal negative... otherwise, if you are just doing digital color-correction while transferring the negative, technically you'd just be darkening it back to normal brightness.

Printing down a denser (overexposed) negative, within reason (not a massively overexposed negative) reduces grain and makes the blacks stronger, which makes the image snappier-looking with richer color saturation.
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#5 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 10 November 2007 - 11:55 PM

If you're willing to pay the extra dough for the push or pull processing, and if it's a soft low contrast you're going for. You'll probably get better results if you decide to underexpose and push process your stock.

Rate the 250 stock at 500 ASA, or however you plan to do it, then push the film. This will give your blacks a greyer milkier look to them and lower your contrast. And the added grain from the push will soften your image a bit.

You could look through the AC magazines, find out what films have pushed their stock and study their look for yourself to see if it's for you.
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#6 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 11 November 2007 - 12:00 AM

Pushing increases contrast, not lowers it. It does, however, increase the base fog level which weakens blacks, but in terms of contrast, pushing increases it, creating a steeper straight-line portion to the characteristic curve with less dynamic range.

Overexposing and pull-processing lowers contrast, mutes colors, makes the response flatter on the characteristic curve.

A good example is the desert flashbacks in "Courage Under Fire" which Roger Deakins overexposed by three stops and then pull-processed by two-stops I believe, giving the scenes a pastel, bleached, soft, dusty feeling.
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#7 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 11 November 2007 - 02:07 AM

Pushing increases contrast, not lowers it. It does, however, increase the base fog level which weakens blacks, but in terms of contrast, pushing increases it, creating a steeper straight-line portion to the characteristic curve with less dynamic range.


Ah, I see what you mean David. I was thinking more in terms of the black levels, and not so much in terms of contrast of detail. Thanks, for clearing that up. It makes perfect sense that since we're exposing less information to the negative, that it would increase the contrast.
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