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Loop Formers (removal) for K-3


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#1 Tony Driver

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Posted 11 November 2007 - 03:15 PM

I've followed the instructions for the removal of K-3 loop formers, pretty much to the letter - no problems engaging the spring etc. Only problem is, I've noticed that the sprocket is set incorrectly and isn't working alongside the pulldown claw, thus chewing my film to bits.

Do I keep readjusting the sprocket or have I screwed it up for good?
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#2 Dominic Alt

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Posted 15 November 2007 - 03:15 PM

I've followed the instructions for the removal of K-3 loop formers, pretty much to the letter - no problems engaging the spring etc. Only problem is, I've noticed that the sprocket is set incorrectly and isn't working alongside the pulldown claw, thus chewing my film to bits.

Do I keep readjusting the sprocket or have I screwed it up for good?

I assume you mean the height of the sprocket is set incorrectly. In that case, you readjust. It's not too hard to get it running properly. There is a correct range for spocket-height. And it sounds like you are outside that range.
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#3 Kristian Schumacher

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Posted 21 November 2007 - 10:56 AM

I just did the same thing to my K-3. Like Tony says, the height of the center sprocket is key. Mine actually runs smoother now than before the removal, because I realised you could adjust this height. Mine had a scratched mark so that I would reallign it properly. I guess a good idea to make a mark before removing the sprocket for the first time.
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#4 Tony Driver

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Posted 24 November 2007 - 07:50 PM

I just did the same thing to my K-3. Like Tony says, the height of the center sprocket is key. Mine actually runs smoother now than before the removal, because I realised you could adjust this height. Mine had a scratched mark so that I would reallign it properly. I guess a good idea to make a mark before removing the sprocket for the first time.


I think the problem is that I didn't mark it properly. I have the height worked out, just not the alignment.
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#5 Dominic Alt

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Posted 25 November 2007 - 01:35 AM

I think the problem is that I didn't mark it properly. I have the height worked out, just not the alignment.

Posted Image

Ok, that's a different problem. You want to find the correct alignment of the main driving sprocket.
The sprocket has two setscrews that hold in on. See the screwdriver on the right in this image? Let's call that setscrew #1.

You want setscrew #1 to go against the flat on the sprocket drive shaft. If you take the baffle plate out, you will be able to see where a flat spot has been cut into the sprocket drive shaft. In the middle of the drive shaft, it's not round, but D-shaped.

After you take the baffle plate out, turn the mechanism until the flat spot is at about 5 o'clock, just like in the picture. Carefully put the baffle plate back in, and when you tighten setscrew #1, it should hit that flat spot. If you get it close, it will naturally auto-align as you gently tighten the setscrew.
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Wooden Camera

Metropolis Post

Gamma Ray Digital Inc