Jump to content


Photo

Tarantino says "I did get to film"


  • Please log in to reply
37 replies to this topic

#1 alessandro sambini

alessandro sambini
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 18 posts
  • 2nd Assistant Camera
  • Italy

Posted 12 November 2007 - 04:36 AM

Hi everybody. As I am a photographer who looks for a carreer in cinematography, I start to wonder: should I get to school? Or should I listen to Q. Tarantino's statement : "Did'nt get to school, did get to film"? It sounds like, "(litterally) If you analyse movies, you do not need to go to school". And again, it sounds like "It does not matter if you get to school. What is important are the natural/native skills you have".
I know that everyone is different, but I still wonder.

At the end, it is a matter of money. I would like to apply for a 8 weeks workshop at the NYFA, but, I am a non US student and it would become very expensive!
I am asking you in order to receive a feedback.

What do you think?
experience vs. school

thanks all of you
ALex
  • 0

#2 Edgar Dubrovskiy

Edgar Dubrovskiy
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 348 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • London

Posted 12 November 2007 - 06:29 AM

I'm in the school (Westminster Film School, London) and I am lovin' it.
No one says you can't go to school and work in the industry (getting experience and contacts, not money!) at the same time. So I do.
  • 0

#3 alessandro sambini

alessandro sambini
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 18 posts
  • 2nd Assistant Camera
  • Italy

Posted 12 November 2007 - 10:12 AM

I'm in the school (Westminster Film School, London) and I am lovin' it.
No one says you can't go to school and work in the industry (getting experience and contacts, not money!) at the same time. So I do.


Yes, you are right. The fact is that I am not sure of which school to apply... I come from Italy and , in any case, it would be an exodus.
That is why I am looking for opinions on: "is it usefull to go to film school?"
  • 0

#4 Adrian Sierkowski

Adrian Sierkowski
  • Sustaining Members
  • 7117 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, Ca

Posted 12 November 2007 - 10:32 AM

It is useful, but in the end it comes down to your needs, wants, and expectations. Every school is different in their style and facilities. It is also true that some of the best education can be gotten "on the job." Both paths are valid and both have benefits and drawbacks. In the end you have to sit yourself down and think; what do I want, what do I need, and how do I get there.
We can only offer out reasons for going to film school.
For myself:
I worked as a PA/Grip for a long time when I was in Highschool with my Dad who did Lighting/Camera for local TV and DVD things (a lot of areobics videos and cooking shows.) This got me some experience and knowledge on nomenclature, and how things overall work. BUT, I didn't have experience outside of video, and nothing in narrative, save for a few commercials here and there when I basically pre-rigged sets (did a lot of pre-rigging.)
The money was good and the satisfaction of seeing something I worked on on TV, and my name in the credits, was also great.
Then it came time for college. I knew I wanted to go because I love learning things (all things.) I went to college not to specifically learn film; though I am in film school and doing well, but moreover to take the other classes which I felt would help me in film (art history, anthropology, sociology, philosophy, history. . basically a smattering of the humanities as well as some Physics (optics and motion and matter etc).
No, having gone to film school I have been able to network with other people who, through their internships from film school (i did not take an internship as it conflicted with my other BA i'm working towards), I have been able to pick up professional shoots as a DP here and there in the ultra low budget/no budget area. Could I have gotten here by going through the industry? Sure. I probably could've gotten higher by now (i mean I've been doing stuff on sets for some cash since I was 10!). But, and this is a big BUT, I'd probably not have been as confident behind the camera, nor known as much about the rest of the world had I not gone to college. Maybe I'd've been better off. Maybe not. But in the end I feel I made the right choice. I get to shoot (hell I HAVE to shoot) a lot on the school's dime for equipment. I get to shoot outside of school here and there for money. And who knows, the connections I've made here might carry further.
I already know one of the professors here wants to use myself and my camera for a film he's working on. and he gives union rates.
So, the moral is: there are many paths to the same destination. Take the one which suites you.
  • 0

#5 Edgar Dubrovskiy

Edgar Dubrovskiy
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 348 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • London

Posted 12 November 2007 - 01:42 PM

Yes, you are right. The fact is that I am not sure of which school to apply... I come from Italy and , in any case, it would be an exodus.
That is why I am looking for opinions on: "is it usefull to go to film school?"


Also, a 95% student discount from Arri is very, very useful : ) !
  • 0

#6 Scott Willis

Scott Willis
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 17 posts
  • Student
  • Boston

Posted 12 November 2007 - 02:09 PM

Also, a 95% student discount from Arri is very, very useful : ) !

arri offers a 95% student discount?? that seems like a typo.
  • 0

#7 Chris Keth

Chris Keth
  • Sustaining Members
  • 4427 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • Los Angeles

Posted 12 November 2007 - 02:32 PM

I think he means the ability to borrow equipment from the school's facilities.

I valued filmschool because I was able to shoot a lot of films in a short period of time. When I screwed up, it wasn't as a big a deal as if I screwed up on a professional production with so much money on the line.

It's certainly up to you but I know I wouldn't have shot that much material with so much variety in four years outside of school.
  • 0

#8 Edgar Dubrovskiy

Edgar Dubrovskiy
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 348 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • London

Posted 12 November 2007 - 03:07 PM

I think he means the ability to borrow equipment from the school's facilities.


No. School is school and Arri is Arri. And I mean Arri.
  • 0

#9 Chris Keth

Chris Keth
  • Sustaining Members
  • 4427 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • Los Angeles

Posted 12 November 2007 - 03:35 PM

No. School is school and Arri is Arri. And I mean Arri.


Arri doesn't give educational discounts. If they did, it wouldn't be 95%.

By the way, you should change your display name to your fll first and last name. It's forum policy.

Edited by Chris Keth, 12 November 2007 - 03:36 PM.

  • 0

#10 Brad Grimmett

Brad Grimmett
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2660 posts
  • Steadicam Operator
  • Los Angeles

Posted 12 November 2007 - 03:41 PM

What do you think?
experience vs. school

thanks all of you
ALex

This question has been discussed quite a bit here on the forum. You should do a search and you'll find plenty of pertinent information.
  • 0

#11 Lars Zemskih

Lars Zemskih
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 119 posts
  • Other

Posted 12 November 2007 - 03:47 PM

Tarantino made it to the industry around 1992, more than 15 years ago. Today, it is a different situation in many aspects.
  • 0

#12 alessandro sambini

alessandro sambini
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 18 posts
  • 2nd Assistant Camera
  • Italy

Posted 13 November 2007 - 02:58 AM

This question has been discussed quite a bit here on the forum. You should do a search and you'll find plenty of pertinent information.


You are right. I looked for, and I have found plenty of information. I just wanted to pourpose a question that suited me more.

Thanks to all of you. In particular to Adrian and Chris.

bye
Alex
  • 0

#13 Dan Salzmann

Dan Salzmann
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1143 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Paris, France

Posted 13 November 2007 - 04:30 AM

And IMHO Tarantino is more of a film fan-recycler than a film maker. Pretentious and annoying in all ways possible.
  • 0

#14 Adrian Sierkowski

Adrian Sierkowski
  • Sustaining Members
  • 7117 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, Ca

Posted 13 November 2007 - 08:33 AM

Anytime,
and Chris makes a nice point about being able to screw up without much worry. It's definitely a benefit! (oh that first roll of plus-x in the bolex still haunts me!)
  • 0

#15 alessandro sambini

alessandro sambini
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 18 posts
  • 2nd Assistant Camera
  • Italy

Posted 13 November 2007 - 09:09 AM

I valued filmschool because I was able to shoot a lot of films in a short period of time. When I screwed up, it wasn't as a big a deal as if I screwed up on a professional production with so much money on the line.

Which school Chris?
  • 0

#16 Michelob Fedusenko

Michelob Fedusenko
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 32 posts
  • Film Loader
  • NYC

Posted 13 November 2007 - 12:03 PM

And IMHO Tarantino is more of a film fan-recycler than a film maker.


I enjoy some of Tarintino's films, but I completely agree.

I attended a class at NYFA and was not impressed. It didn't meet my needs for a film school. It is very important to research the school and evaluate if it will meet your needs.

I decided to attend Full Sail where I have learned an enormous amount. I also paid roughly $60,000 for a B.S. (as opposed to $26,000 for a certificate at NYFA) for tuition alone, but I am also working with equipment that you will never touch at NYU, NYFA, or USC. But then again, I came to Full Sail because I wanted a degree in less than 2 years, also.

When it comes down to it, you need to know why you are going to school. NYFA and Full Sail are practical based schools teaching you mostly the skills and craft to shoot a film. NYFA focuses a little more on the theory, but you miss so much of the technical end. Schools like NYU and USC are theory based schools. They will teach you why a shot is moving left to right or vise versa.

Now as for whether school has been worth it.... I paid $60k to make every mistake possible and it won't affect my reputation (to any major extent) in the industry. I won't be green (or as green) out there. But then again, it is all about what you make of it. 80% of my classmates go home and play video games while I go to shoots. So if you decide to go to film school, you will ONLY get what you put in.

It is a big investment. I hope I helped you out.

Edited by Michelob Fedusenko, 13 November 2007 - 12:06 PM.

  • 0

#17 Adrian Sierkowski

Adrian Sierkowski
  • Sustaining Members
  • 7117 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, Ca

Posted 13 November 2007 - 12:13 PM

you will ONLY get what you put in.

It is a big investment. I hope I helped you out.


Amen to that.
I had the benefit of going to a pretty production oriented 4 year school (temple univ) which was a good price point at 8000/yr for instate. But it is definitally about working your ass off! And most importantly, try to distinguish yourself. Don't just do what a certain project may require, but go the extra miles to make it amazing. Make it unique. And also; dont get discouraged.
  • 0

#18 Andy_Alderslade

Andy_Alderslade
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1055 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • London, UK

Posted 13 November 2007 - 02:33 PM

I'm in the school (Westminster Film School, London) and I am lovin' it.
No one says you can't go to school and work in the industry (getting experience and contacts, not money!) at the same time. So I do.


There are some issues with going to school/university if you wish to go into the technical end of production, at least in the UK.

I have been told numerous times, that camera crew/sound crew will deliberatly avoid hiring students/graduates as trainees because they have a low success rate with turning them into usefull members of their unit.

Now there are hundreds of graduates in technical roles in the UK industry, so its not impossible, but it seems to be something to be aware off, especially if persuing work in the technical departments.


However if the intention is to be a shooter, in what ever form that may be rather than working up through a department, a film school that produces lots of shorts will definetly be a great help, allowing one to build up a varied showreel.

My film school (Bristol Uni) made very few shorts/pieces, and was subsequently 95% a complete waste of time!
  • 0

#19 Chris Keth

Chris Keth
  • Sustaining Members
  • 4427 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • Los Angeles

Posted 13 November 2007 - 03:50 PM

Which school Chris?


Rochester Institute of Technology in Rochester, New York. Pretty small film school but it is right with a rather large and prestigious photography school. I took a lot of classes on both sides.
  • 0

#20 Michelob Fedusenko

Michelob Fedusenko
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 32 posts
  • Film Loader
  • NYC

Posted 13 November 2007 - 05:24 PM

I have been told numerous times, that camera crew/sound crew will deliberatly avoid hiring students/graduates as trainees because they have a low success rate with turning them into usefull members of their unit.


That is true, which is why I don't advertise to crews that I go to film school. The problem is not the school, but the student. Many kids leave school thinking that because they have a degree, they are the junk. They think that they don't have to climb the ranks like everyone else. That is just simply not true.

Also, many of the students think they know more than they really do and then act like it. You can only get away with acting like you know more than you really do if you already know that you don't.

Edited by Michelob Fedusenko, 13 November 2007 - 05:26 PM.

  • 0


CineLab

rebotnix Technologies

FJS International, LLC

CineTape

Aerial Filmworks

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Metropolis Post

The Slider

Technodolly

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Abel Cine

Glidecam

Ritter Battery

Willys Widgets

Tai Audio

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Opal

Wooden Camera

Paralinx LLC

Rig Wheels Passport

Visual Products

Ritter Battery

FJS International, LLC

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Broadcast Solutions Inc

The Slider

Wooden Camera

CineLab

rebotnix Technologies

Aerial Filmworks

Technodolly

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Metropolis Post

CineTape

Rig Wheels Passport

Abel Cine

Opal

Visual Products

Glidecam

Paralinx LLC

Tai Audio

Willys Widgets