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Digi-beta material to DV-Cam


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#1 cheryl martinez

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Posted 13 November 2007 - 01:28 PM

Does anyone know how to get around this problem? I had footage from digi-beta and DVD (taken with permission!). This was edited with final cut pro and it all looked fine. I took the finished video on my external disc as an uncompressed quick time movie. Then it was loaded into AVID and later played out onto a DV-Cam tape. All this in PAL. On the AVID and DV-Cam tape some of the scenes looked jerky, as if they needed to be de-interlaced. These were all the DVD scenes, but also some of the digi-beta ones.

As a test I loaded the uncompressed quick time movie back onto a different final cut pro and played it out again to DV-Cam. It looked wonderful. But as soon as it was in the control room to go on-air and it was played back on again a different DV-Cam machine, it again looked jerky.

I understand the problems with upper and lower fields, and tried it all which way, but nothing helped. What to do?
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#2 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 17 November 2007 - 04:18 PM

Does anyone know how to get around this problem? I had footage from digi-beta and DVD (taken with permission!). This was edited with final cut pro and it all looked fine. I took the finished video on my external disc as an uncompressed quick time movie. Then it was loaded into AVID and later played out onto a DV-Cam tape. All this in PAL. On the AVID and DV-Cam tape some of the scenes looked jerky, as if they needed to be de-interlaced. These were all the DVD scenes, but also some of the digi-beta ones.

As a test I loaded the uncompressed quick time movie back onto a different final cut pro and played it out again to DV-Cam. It looked wonderful. But as soon as it was in the control room to go on-air and it was played back on again a different DV-Cam machine, it again looked jerky.

I understand the problems with upper and lower fields, and tried it all which way, but nothing helped. What to do?


I think a CRT monitor is more useful than any other type of monitor for catching the type of problem you are having. Should we assume your project was PAL all the way through, from the very first step to the very last one? The problems could have been masked because you were viewing on a computer monitor and not a CRT.

Also, the loading in and out of different NLE systems can also cause this problem. Was there any reason to load into the AVID if you already were in Final Cut Pro? You may want to make a DV-CAM dub directly from the Final Cut Pro time-line and see if that has the same problem you are having after going into Avid and then outputting.
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#3 cheryl martinez

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Posted 18 November 2007 - 10:23 AM

Thanks for the reply, here are my answers to your questions: I was viewing on a CRT all down the line. The entire project was in PAL, every step. I had to output onto a hard disk because I didn't have the tape machine the client wanted to project to mastered on (DV). So in order to get it out onto tape, the only possibility was to load from the hard disk onto the AVID and then out again. As soon as we looked at the material over the AVID, we could see the problems with jerky pictures.

But later on, I had the chance to go from the hard disk onto a Final Cut system and then out to tape. I didn't see the problems when playing directly from Final Cut or even after recording to tape and looking at it in the Final Cut editing suite on a CRT. We only saw problems when we took it into the control room to be broadcast. They also had a DV machine to play back on and we looked at the material over a broadcast monitor.

Are there really problems with compatability of different NLE systems? I didn't know that. But still, that alone would not explain my problems. Would be grateful if you have any thoughts on this - or if anyone does!
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#4 David Auner aac

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Posted 18 November 2007 - 03:50 PM

What settings did you use for export? Lower/upper field first? What codec? QT reference?

Cheers, Dave
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#5 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 21 November 2007 - 05:32 AM

Unfortunately, component analog video continues to get a bad rap from people who haven't even used it and can't quite wrap their head around how incredibly useful this export signal really is.

Component analog video is a digital codec's best friend. If various digital tape formats all have different compression codecs and algorithms, then digitally dubbing between these digital formats may not necessarily be a flawless procedure. A logical workaround would be to output a digital video signal via analog component and then re-encode in the new digital video codec that is being transfered to. True the cheapest digital decks on the market don't have true analog component output, but you do get what you pay for, and there are mini-dv and dv-cam decks for around 2 grand and up that allow for component analog outputs. Actually, S-video output is acceptable as well.

I think it's asking for trouble to assume all digital video codecs and compression algorithms all happily dub between each other in the digital domain. It's probably more likely that if one outputs from a digital deck or NLE systems via the component R-Y, B-Y, Y signal, then re-encodes in the new digital video format, they will have less chance of video jerkiness occuring or other unexpected problems.

That's why when it comes to standard def, Betacam Sp and Digital Betacam are such great options for transferring film to. Betacam sp for it's lower cost, Digital betacam for it's supposedly lossless quality. However it costs a LOT more to work from digital betacam masters than betacam sp masters, that's why betacam sp mastering continues to be best of many worlds when it comes to standard def.
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#6 Candy Carn

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Posted 14 December 2008 - 03:15 AM

Hello and sorry to jum in so late. DigiBeta to DVD is this the same as betamax? I'm looking at getting my tapes done by this firm http://www.video-to-dvd.co.uk who do DigiBeta to DVD but they do not explain the difference with video tapes. Any help would be so good. Thanks so much. I want to say how good the forum is but sorry I just don't understand any of it. It does look jolly professional though.
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#7 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 15 December 2008 - 10:57 PM

Hello and sorry to jum in so late. DigiBeta to DVD is this the same as betamax? I'm looking at getting my tapes done by this firm http://www.video-to-dvd.co.uk who do DigiBeta to DVD but they do not explain the difference with video tapes. Any help would be so good. Thanks so much. I want to say how good the forum is but sorry I just don't understand any of it. It does look jolly professional though.



You really don't want to go digi-beta to DVD unless it is a data dvd that can be played back at high quality, much higher than DVD quality, or be converted to a digital video signal later on that once again, is much higher quality than DVD quality.

The primary reason to go Digi-beta to DVD is for viewing purposes only.
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