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What stock is best for getting colors to pop?


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#1 Alexander Disenhof

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Posted 13 November 2007 - 05:15 PM

I am shooting a short film soon on S16, and the director wants the colors to really be rich and really pop out. I am planning on pushing the film 2 stops to help with this, but is there a certain film stock that is better for getting rich colors? I have heard some good things about the Fugifilm Vivid 160 stock...any ideas?
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#2 Chris Keth

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Posted 13 November 2007 - 06:23 PM

I am shooting a short film soon on S16, and the director wants the colors to really be rich and really pop out. I am planning on pushing the film 2 stops to help with this, but is there a certain film stock that is better for getting rich colors? I have heard some good things about the Fugifilm Vivid 160 stock...any ideas?


Check out the In Production forum, the post about "The Naked Eye." It was all shot on vivid 160 pushed a stop. It looks gorgeous and sounds like what you're looking for.
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#3 Brian Rose

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Posted 13 November 2007 - 06:25 PM

Actually, I just finished a shoot using the 160 stock. Really, really superb stuff, in my opinion. It seems to be especially good for your warmer, harvest colors, yellow, red and orange. Much of what I shot was on a sound stage. It was heavily lit, with extreme shadows for a German expressionist/Faustian type feel. The actress was a blond with golden skin, and a red costume, and I was amazed at how rich they looked. Has to be seen to be believed. Wish I had screen grabs, but we're still working off a work print at this stage. But if you want colors to pop, the 160 is what you want. Of course, production and costume design will be an important part, and you'll want a good amount of light. On my shoot, I lit with three 2K Fresnels, and supplemented it with a bunch of lowell lights from the DP kit. Probably a bit much, but I was trying to match the f stop with the daylight exteriors. Roughly an 8, if I recall. Based on that, the colors were pretty far out!

I should ask, is the shoot primarily outdoors, or inside? I have less experience with the 64D, and the shoot's color palette was more muted, but it stands to reason that if the 160 renders colors a certain way, the 64 should do as well, perhaps better. But if you're shooting mostly interiors, best to stick with the 160, rather than have to mess with those conversion filters from daylight to tungsten.

Best,
Brian Rose
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#4 K Borowski

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Posted 13 November 2007 - 06:56 PM

I don't know if it's in your price range, as it is more expensive (although after a two stop push, neg film is probably in the same ball park price-wise), but you may want to consider Kodak's E100VS, 7285. It's 100-speed, daylight balanced, and it is basically respooled vivid saturated Ektachrome slide film. I would also think the older EXR stocks, like 5245 or the EXR 100 or 200 T films if you can find them, would give you a look more after what you are going for compared to the VIsion 2 Films.

Fuji may be better for this. I've never used Fuji ECN-2 stocks though, so I won't cast any comparisons between Kodak and Fuji here as to which is better. The 160 Fuji may work much better than E100VS.

My recommendation is to buy some short-ends of each and try them at different EIs to see which you like best.

Otherwise it's really a roll of the dice as to whether you've gotten the stock that works "best" for your circumstances, as only your mind's eye knows what "best" is.

~KB
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Paralinx LLC

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

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Broadcast Solutions Inc

Metropolis Post

Ritter Battery

Aerial Filmworks

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