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Double Exposure questions.....


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#1 Nick Castronuova

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Posted 15 November 2007 - 01:25 AM

Can someone explain a little bit about double exposure to me. Like, let's say I wanted to rewind the film slightly and do some lame ghost effect, would it be possible? How would you get that transparent/translucent look?

Thanks
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#2 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 15 November 2007 - 02:02 AM

Can someone explain a little bit about double exposure to me. Like, let's say I wanted to rewind the film slightly and do some lame ghost effect, would it be possible? How would you get that transparent/translucent look?

Thanks


Um, by rewinding the film and then shooting a new scene?
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#3 jacob thomas

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Posted 15 November 2007 - 03:20 PM

Can someone explain a little bit about double exposure to me. Like, let's say I wanted to rewind the film slightly and do some lame ghost effect, would it be possible? How would you get that transparent/translucent look?

Thanks


Some cameras had a limited double exposure capability of about 90 frames (e.g. Canon 1014 AutoZoom, Beaulieu 4008ZM2 [with declutch button and rewinder accessory]).

There were also cart rewinding devices made. See Rewinding


You could also break the cart and take the film out after the first exposure and reload the film in a reloadable cart as in they did in the Other Half.

Alternatively you could do this effect in one exposure with a reflection of the ghost.

Do some research and you'll find more info on all of these options. :angry:

Edited by jacob thomas, 15 November 2007 - 03:24 PM.

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#4 Nick Castronuova

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Posted 15 November 2007 - 03:56 PM

Thanks for the subtle sarcasm but I was more particularly wondering about the f-stops, etc? If you over/underexpose the second shot.
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#5 Leo Anthony Vale

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Posted 15 November 2007 - 04:48 PM

Thanks for the subtle sarcasm but I was more particularly wondering about the f-stops, etc? If you over/underexpose the second shot.


Depends on how bright you want the ghost to be.

The ghost should be against a black backing.
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#6 Nick Mulder

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Posted 15 November 2007 - 04:51 PM

Thanks for the subtle sarcasm but I was more particularly wondering about the f-stops, etc? If you over/underexpose the second shot.


For a locked off (non moving camera on a tripod) ghost effect shoot your scene once without the moving ghost and then once with scooby-doo.

Now depending on how transparent you want scooby-doo to be is how much you offset the exposure in each 'pass' (you'll be getting into motion control/green screen before you know it! ;) )

For %50 transparency each pass should be half of what your light meter says the exposure should be - so f8 becomes two passes of f16 so they 'add up' or 'integrate' to the correct exposure for the background and halfliness-ish-ness for the ghost ... For only partial ghostliness expose even more on the talent pass and less on the background plate (is that the correct term?) - and so on ...

Get it ?

yeh!

cool

Just a tip>> Its better if you are 'particularly wondering' about anything in particular to ask the particular question you are wondering about :lol: Otherwise people dont feel particularly inclined to write a helpful reply
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#7 jacob thomas

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Posted 15 November 2007 - 07:07 PM

Thanks for the subtle sarcasm but I was more particularly wondering about the f-stops, etc? If you over/underexpose the second shot.


Your total exposure on the non ghostly elements should add up to the correct exposure.
So if it's just a room with a ghost walking around in it you expose one stop less than your meter says (as nick said) each time.

If you want to have non ghost characters moving around as well it gets more complicated and perhaps it would be easier to use the classic reflection method ("Pepper's Ghost")
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#8 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 15 November 2007 - 09:53 PM

Thanks for the subtle sarcasm but I was more particularly wondering about the f-stops, etc? If you over/underexpose the second shot.


I'm sorry for the sarcasm but sometimes I wish people would shoot first, especially when it comes to experimenting. Just experiment and have fun.

I've probably shot 50 times more experimental footage than I have actual scripted scenes, it's fun and eventually those shots either make it into a scripted movie or they can actually give a person script ideas. I also think your question is difficult to get a consensus on. Wardrobe, skin color, hair color, make-up and the background set are all variables that can turn any f-stop strategy consensus on it's axis.
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#9 Nick Castronuova

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Posted 05 December 2007 - 03:37 AM

Thanks for the helpful replies everyone!
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