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#1 Matthew Buick

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Posted 18 November 2007 - 05:41 PM

Hi.

It something I just realised I didn't know. I'm guessing 'E' stands for Eastman, but the rest, I have no clue...

Best Regards.
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 18 November 2007 - 06:30 PM

I thought it stood for "extended range" but I don't know for sure.
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#3 K Borowski

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Posted 19 November 2007 - 12:25 AM

I thought it stood for "extended range" but I don't know for sure.


Me too.
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#4 Matthew Buick

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Posted 19 November 2007 - 06:03 PM

Extended Range certainly seems to make more sense. I suppose they made 50D 200T and 500T speed, and just plugged 5247 in with and '8' instead.

Thanks David.
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#5 Matthew Buick

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Posted 20 November 2007 - 03:31 PM

That reminds me, does anyone know what an MP Stock is?
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#6 K Borowski

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Posted 20 November 2007 - 03:35 PM

That reminds me, does anyone know what an MP Stock is?


Umm, motion picture? Don't they use abbreviations across the pond?
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#7 Matthew Buick

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Posted 20 November 2007 - 04:24 PM

It wasn't abbreviated on any sort of can or cartridge I've even seen, but it was in big letters on a can of Vivid 160 I saw, so I assumed it was something to do with high contrast.

In Britain we like to use real words.
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#8 Chris Keth

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Posted 20 November 2007 - 10:01 PM

In Britain we like to use real words.


You really should come over here and learn. We've bastardized english for the better, I think. ;)
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#9 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 21 November 2007 - 04:47 AM

I thought it stood for "extended range" but I don't know for sure.

It does. I won a t-shirt at a Kodak event for knowing that! :)
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#10 Matthew Buick

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Posted 21 November 2007 - 03:32 PM

You really should come over here and learn. We've bastardized english for the better, I think. ;)


Absolutely never!! I'm not spending nine hours on a plane to come and listen to some illitarate fatties.


It does. I won a t-shirt at a Kodak event for knowing that! :)


When I was five I won a shirt fr naming five types of Apple. :)
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#11 Stephen Williams

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Posted 21 November 2007 - 04:38 PM

I thought it stood for "extended range" but I don't know for sure.


Hi David,

That's what they called it when it came out!

Stephen
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#12 Charles MacDonald

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Posted 21 November 2007 - 09:43 PM

Absolutely never!! I'm not spending nine hours on a plane to come and listen to some illitarate fatties.


Since I have heard it said that the Americans and the British are two peoples separated by a common language it is probaly not good to emphasise the differences. Since I live in Canada I get exposed to both variants and manage to understand most of them, although my wife hasa dikens of a time making any sense of the folks on "Corrination Street"

Speken american english does varry, I can remeber being in a taxi in Houston with a maddly driving cabbie trying to shout at a woman in the next lane to tell her she had a "flat TAR" which I would call a Tire and a Britt would call a Tyre.

AS far as abbrevations, there are many british manuals that are loaded with them, and they either help comunications by reducing the size of the writting or make them imposible when one cannot fathom the meanning of the phrase.
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#13 Michael Collier

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Posted 21 November 2007 - 10:04 PM

In Britain we like to use real words.


Are you kidding me? I needed subtitles for Lock Stock and Two Smoking barrels, and million other brittish films. Every language has its own vernacular, and often times English and American don't line up. Sometimes it does seem like a different language, with its own (sometimes) non-real words.
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#14 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 21 November 2007 - 11:04 PM

I'm surprised something Buick said has brought on so much discussion.

How about this, there's no such thing as an American or English accent. All accents and form of English speaking are regional, no matter which side of the pond you're on. I'm sure Matthew's manner of speaking is quite different from a Londoner's, given his region. Just as my accent would be noticeably different from an Orange County native.

btw, I just got done AC'ing a BBC docudrama about the Alcatraz escapees. It's due to be on Channel 4 come Spring :)

Edited by Jonathan Bowerbank, 21 November 2007 - 11:06 PM.

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#15 Matthew Buick

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Posted 22 November 2007 - 04:51 PM

Since I have heard it said that the Americans and the British are two peoples separated by a common language it is probaly not good to emphasise the differences. Since I live in Canada I get exposed to both variants and manage to understand most of them, although my wife hasa dikens of a time making any sense of the folks on "Corrination Street"

Speken american english does varry, I can remeber being in a taxi in Houston with a maddly driving cabbie trying to shout at a woman in the next lane to tell her she had a "flat TAR" which I would call a Tire and a Britt would call a Tyre.


Here in Newcastle a broad Goerdie would call a tyre a 'Tayyah'. Yet forty miles down the road in Teeside a tyre would be called a 'Tuuyyrr'. It's amazing how much different the accents of two areas only a few miles apart are. I heard someone say that strong Geordie accents sounds like rapid Danish.

I seem to have dug a bit of a hole for myself with my previous statement about British English having more real words, and I suppose there's truth in that. American English (Cringe!!) seems to be a good deal more collquial, I can think of some exceptions to this rule though.

Here's one:

American: Elevator - British: Lift.

P.S Bowerbank, how did the Prisoner escape from Alcatraz? Did you get stuck in any secret pipes or caves?
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#16 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 23 November 2007 - 02:46 AM

P.S Bowerbank, how did the Prisoner escape from Alcatraz? Did you get stuck in any secret pipes or caves?


Go rent the film "Escape from Alcatraz" with Clint Eastwood. It's actually quite accurate.
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#17 Michael Lehnert

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Posted 23 November 2007 - 02:02 PM

I'm surprised something Buick said has brought on so much discussion.


Howdiehoo, yankees, this is a rather positively strange thread indeed, isn't it? A couple of days away "overseas", and when you come back, you find this linguistic gem on the forum. Well, I think this even beats some of your Super 8 threads, Matthew ;) !

Matthew, to assist in your newly-found indulgent love for EXR film stock (the last roll shot for a film project of my film group came from Swiss-stored stock in Zürich, just...uhm... 13 months ago. Maybe they have some left which you could buy and send to Pro8mm or Spectra to have it loaded into Super 8 cartridges for a project of yours?!):
The EXR acronym for the direct successor to the venerable Eastmancolor series of the 1980s was originally supposed to mean 'Eastmancolor eXtended Range', but it was marketed as 'EXR' only, and was commonly referred to as "Extended Range" by reps and sales material, as everyone here does 'til this day (don't you ever at least google a term :huh: !?). So the original connection to Eastmancolor was dropped early on, and paved the way (marketing-wise) for dropping the Eastman-reference entirely, replacing it in an effort of cross-product-branding with the more recognisable 'Kodak' name that every film stock now bears (before that - as elder members will remember - you actually bought Eastman film stock, not Kodak film stock).

As far as travelling to the US & UK is concerned: as someone used to speak half-a-dozen languages on a job, this really is not a issue after a 9 hours flight from Newark to Heathrow, Matthew: what you should worry about is less jingoistic regress but getting through US immigration (always an innovative attack on human dignity) or to actually get anywhere using public or private transport from Heathrow ? M4, Piccadilly line, mad private cabbies, bus lanes on motorways etc. blabla ? which too is always an innovative attack on human dignity...

I gather you love the EXR look. With regard to Jonathan's Eastwood reference, I suggest reading through this utterly excellent thread as it harks much further back to cinematic aesthetics that I would say kind of died with (and incl) EXR. Sometimes I wonder what results Vision2 would herald if films where shot with simple lighting set-ups or just good old available light, with a DoP guessing the f-stop from looking at the sun instead of incident-metering the stand-ins to death.
In so far, Matthew, grab your XL (existing light)-based Canon 814XL-S, set the variable shutter opening angle to 220° (away from its 150° default) and just expose some MP film through your Kodapak or Ektasound Coaxial Instamatic-Cartridges that you might or might not have at hand.
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#18 Matthew Buick

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Posted 23 November 2007 - 03:51 PM

Go rent the film "Escape from Alcatraz" with Clint Eastwood. It's actually quite accurate.


I've got that film on DVD. Or at leaset I had it, my brother borrowed it about two months ago and I haven't seen it since. I think he sold it to a kid at school. I'm going to march up to him and demand it back.

The reason I asked for comments on your shoot Jonathan was that I hoped you would have lost your dignity jammed in a sewer pipe with everybody present having to pull you out. (Joke ;) )

Howdiehoo, yankees, this is a rather positively strange thread indeed, isn't it? A couple of days away "overseas", and when you come back, you find this linguistic gem on the forum. Well, I think this even beats some of your Super 8 threads, Matthew ;) !

Matthew, to assist in your newly-found indulgent love for EXR film stock (the last roll shot for a film project of my film group came from Swiss-stored stock in Zürich, just...uhm... 13 months ago. Maybe they have some left which you could buy and send to Pro8mm or Spectra to have it loaded into Super 8 cartridges for a project of yours?!

Sometimes I wonder what results Vision2 would herald if films where shot with simple lighting set-ups or just good old available light, with a DoP guessing the f-stop from looking at the sun instead of incident-metering the stand-ins to death.
In so far, Matthew, grab your XL (existing light)-based Canon 814XL-S, set the variable shutter opening angle to 220° (away from its 150° default) and just expose some MP film through your Kodapak or Ektasound Coaxial Instamatic-Cartridges that you might or might not have at hand.



Well thanks for praising my thread, it does seem to be rather popular.

I've just bought some EXR '48 from pro8mm on Sunday. $20.00 a roll, shipping was damn pricey though.

I would like to learn to eyeball a shot. It's a rare skill these days. Did you know Douglas Slocombe was nominated for an OSCAR for a film he didn't even touch a light meter while making.

I just shot some footage of my cat a couple of weeks ago. I'm rather down on cash at this point, so I can't afford to process my films.

Edited by Matthew Buick, 23 November 2007 - 03:52 PM.

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#19 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 23 November 2007 - 05:08 PM

The reason I asked for comments on your shoot Jonathan was that I hoped you would have lost your dignity jammed in a sewer pipe with everybody present having to pull you out. (Joke ;) )


No sewer pipes involved, that was Shawshank! The worst I had to deal with was an old dusty 3 1/2' wide utility corridor for the first 5 hours of shooting.
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#20 Matthew Buick

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Posted 24 November 2007 - 03:34 PM

Oh. :( <_<


;) :P
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