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rating film with different ASAs


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#1 Michael McCormick

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Posted 19 November 2007 - 12:42 AM

I read of a DP who rated Kodak?s EXR 5298 (500T) film as 320 in order to get a thicker negative. I understand why you'd want the thicker negative, but wouldn't your film be overexposed? I know the latitude of negative film gives you some leeway, but how do you know what the limitations are? What is the difference in stops of rating a 500 speed film as 320, if that question even makes sense.
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#2 Steve Wallace

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Posted 19 November 2007 - 12:58 AM

I read of a DP who rated Kodak?s EXR 5298 (500T) film as 320 in order to get a thicker negative. I understand why you'd want the thicker negative, but wouldn't your film be overexposed? I know the latitude of negative film gives you some leeway, but how do you know what the limitations are? What is the difference in stops of rating a 500 speed film as 320, if that question even makes sense.


320 to 500 is 2/3rds of a stop. (320>400>500) It's customary to over expose if you are going to print especially. It will saturate colors a bit, give you richer backs, and tighten grain.

Rating the film, is just an easy way of remembering; "For this certain look I desire, I am going to to overexpose everything 2/3's of a stop, without doing the converstions in my head. I'll let my light meter do the math for me".
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#3 Michael Nash

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Posted 19 November 2007 - 01:04 AM

but wouldn't your film be overexposed?


Yes, the negative will be overexposed. But you can then use higher printer lights to make a print of normal brightness while retaining the benefits of a denser negative. The same general principle applies to telecine transfer as well.
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#4 Michael McCormick

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Posted 19 November 2007 - 02:13 AM

I was looking up Super 16mm film stocks and found the KODAK VISION2 500T Color Negative Film 5218 / 7218

Is the 5218 and the 7218 two different stocks? What's the difference between the two? How do you 'read' the stock numbers?

What's the differences between these stocks:

KODAK VISION 5279 500T
KODAK VISION2 5218 / 7218 500T
KODAK VISION2 Expression 5229 / 7229 500T

Edited by Michael McCormick, 19 November 2007 - 02:16 AM.

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#5 Alex Worster

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Posted 19 November 2007 - 02:30 AM

Anything Kodak that starts with 52 is 35mm. Anything Kodak that starts 72 is 16mm. 5279 is Kodak's older 500T Vision 1 stock, now they're on Vision 2 (5218) and soon to be Vision 3 (5219). There are differences in the "look" and latitude of the different lines of stock. Generally as Kodak comes out with newer film they have more latitude and less grain. 5229 and 7229 is Kodak's Expression line which is basically a low con stock, pastelly, and grainy. Kodak's website has all this stuff.
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#6 XiaoSu Han

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Posted 19 November 2007 - 09:28 AM

a quick question:

is grading it down in telecine to the grey card ive shot in that scene (where i overexposed by 2/3rd of a stop) the same as the printer lights method?

regards
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#7 Chris Keth

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Posted 19 November 2007 - 10:40 AM

a quick question:

is grading it down in telecine to the grey card ive shot in that scene (where i overexposed by 2/3rd of a stop) the same as the printer lights method?

regards


Yeah, basically. You're just recording to a digital sensor rather than bi-packing with print film.
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