Jump to content


Photo

camera jams at end of film


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 Leigh Goldstein

Leigh Goldstein
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 23 posts
  • Student

Posted 20 November 2007 - 05:28 AM

This 1014XLS shows the "End" flag about 20s early. A lot of slapping the side of the camera and hitting the shoot button gets to the end of the roll eventually.

Is this the kind of thing that cleaning can help? Can I do that myself?

Or is it possible for a professional to repair?

TIA.

P.S. it often jams once in the first 5s too.
  • 0

#2 Michael Lehnert

Michael Lehnert
  • Sustaining Members
  • 1086 posts
  • Other
  • London, UK / Basel, CH

Posted 20 November 2007 - 08:58 AM

What film stock?
Do you pre-treat the cartridge before inserting it into the camera?
What was the specific set-up of the scene (fps particularly)?
How often and how regular in your ownership was your camera CLA'd?
What do you know

Hint: I suspect none of the usual suspects of the Super 8 Scene, i.e. camera or cartridge, but actually film stock loaded by 3rd party causing problems.
  • 0

#3 andy oliver

andy oliver
  • Sustaining Members
  • 258 posts
  • Other
  • uk

Posted 20 November 2007 - 12:22 PM

Hey, dont bang the camera:), i've never experianced any problems with a canon super 8 camera, possibly the most reliable cameras out there... Which filmstock was you using????. Early batches of 50d cinevia were a slight problem, very jumpy... Before you right off that camera, buy a roll of 64t, or plus x., anything thats not the same batch as to the stock you are using..
  • 0

#4 Leigh Goldstein

Leigh Goldstein
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 23 posts
  • Student

Posted 20 November 2007 - 04:18 PM

It's recently acquired camera never CLA'd; 18 fps on kodak Tri-x and Vision2 400T.

The rolls were exposed over a four hour time to a three day time period. The camera was on tripod which was moved around... in some cases a lot, in other cases not much. Shots were three to 10 seconds long.

So CLA is the thing to do?
  • 0

#5 Michael Lehnert

Michael Lehnert
  • Sustaining Members
  • 1086 posts
  • Other
  • London, UK / Basel, CH

Posted 20 November 2007 - 06:05 PM

So CLA is the thing to do?


Yes, Yes, Yes (continue this line of words in perpetuity)

Would you buy an automobile 2nd hand that is aged 27 years (so let's say a Cadillac Seville or or Lincoln Versailles) that was hyperexpensive then but changes hands for a nickel and a dime today, onto which you trust your career or work of art'n love (say, you are a cab driver, or a car restorer) and use it regularly; would you do all this but never check the tyre pressure, the oil pressure, the cleaning tank, the oil reserve, corrosion under the wheel-arches, doublecheck underneath the vinyl rool, lube the seat beat tensioners, de-FCKW the A/C, and look out for a good garagist that knows old machinery run more by mechanics than by electronic malfunction-ware?

I very much doubt you would run a car like that. Why would you not want to clean, lubricate and adjust/collimate a film camera that will serve you virtually perpetually if properly cared for? I run Super 8 cameras which are older than me (not difficult to achieve in a forum where few are beyond their twens, but still...) and they run like they were new, with better frame stability and lower frame variance than some highly-regarded-but-quite-overrated Municam gear from the mid-1970s.

Not saying anything against you here, Leigh, as I really don't mean you, but I am truly sick and tired of self-proclaimed Super 8 filmmakers who don't make any attempt of grasping the basic craft of cinematography, run their gear without the slightest fukcing care (if they treat their female of male acquaintances like that as well, no wonder they are mostly loners...), but are the first to knock off Super 8 cameras or, even more likely, the Super 8 cartrdige itself as being ill-engineered and prone to fail all the time (they then start babbling about Single 8 or Double-Super 8 and conclude with statements about registration pins and pressure plate that can only be describled most kindly as "ill-informed").

Anyone who knows even a tiny bit off all this subject matter were are talking here, plus indulged into 16 and 35 formats, should realise what utterly astonishing and miracuously advanced and excellently-engineered gear was offered at all levels, but particularly at the top-of-the-market and high-end.
The Kodapak Coaxial Instamatic-Cartridge is the prime example of a decade-long successful, mass-produced, 99%-fully-functioning feast of engineering consumable by every income level, even today. And I wish many N16/S16 or N35/S35 cameras had the degree of possibilities and horizon of capabilities that S8 cameras allow out-of-the-box which you even can't "do in post" today (as if FCP will righten every wrong that some goofy caused on set... :wacko: )
And even though I have nothing but bad memories of the Ektasound Coaxial Instamatic-Cartridge and that problematic 18frame-off commag sound system, I respect it as delivering better results attempting what it wanted to be than many contemporary "prosumer" gear from Panazony.

I had a phantastic S8 week-end, watching several screened films shot in the 1980s by the film group I am part of, the PP, which were just fully restored and cleaned by a lab. I must say I was utterly shocked by the rock-steadiness of the now-old-but-CLA'd, then brand-new Bauer C 700 XLM shots on Agfachrome and Plus-X (the old 7276) and the audio quality of the commag stripe at 18fps (!). You could not see any noticeable grain of the 7276 on the silver screen, and it looked as if it was shot yesterday. The frame variance was better than anything I have seen from broadcast-used Arriflex 16 SR 1 - 3 (excl. the 3 Advanced with the lateral guides, only took them 20 Bavarian years to figure that out) and the projection was done through the multicoated Schneider Xenovaron 1,3/12-30 at full wide angle to get the biggest possible projected picture on the screen which should have already degraded the quality as much as possible.

As someone working with Super 8 for decades (gosh, I am getting old...) I was shocked that it actually shocked me how good 7% of a 35mm frame can look in classical theatrical settings. I now face the problem of finding a barn-load of money to HD telecine this material to do it at least some form of justice when we self-release it (it plus 25 other films). Anything lower ? which I realised thanks to Todd-AO here in London - is like buying a 60m yacht and then never sailing further ashore than 500 yards.

It's grand time people put the same understanding of cinematographic professionality to this format than to the other three ones, otherwise, we will always waste our time with people ranting against plastic pressure plates and consumer cameras which they were and yet were anything but.

[Euphoric rant ends]
  • 0


Technodolly

FJS International, LLC

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Abel Cine

The Slider

Visual Products

Aerial Filmworks

Willys Widgets

rebotnix Technologies

Glidecam

Metropolis Post

Rig Wheels Passport

Tai Audio

Wooden Camera

Opal

Ritter Battery

Paralinx LLC

CineLab

CineTape

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Abel Cine

Visual Products

Broadcast Solutions Inc

CineLab

Paralinx LLC

Technodolly

Opal

Rig Wheels Passport

Aerial Filmworks

CineTape

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Ritter Battery

Glidecam

FJS International, LLC

Willys Widgets

Wooden Camera

Metropolis Post

rebotnix Technologies

The Slider

Tai Audio