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#1 Colm Whelan

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Posted 24 November 2007 - 08:27 AM

Just about to shoot a film on hd. got a complex bedroom scene where the director wants it to be all white and fluffy like a detergent commercial. only thing is everyone seems to be saying dont use white sheets and that hd cant deal with real whites etc. all the other depts seem to be shocked I am using whites and going for it. anyone heard about this? I've shot digi before and it handled whites well and I assumed HD would cope even better. want that fluffy bleached look without burning stuff out. any thoughts? thanks
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#2 Walter Graff

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Posted 24 November 2007 - 08:35 AM

want that fluffy bleached look without burning stuff out. any thoughts? thanks


You just answered it. Simply don't burn things out and you'll be fine. 100% white is white. doesn't mean you can have that. And it doesn't mean your whites can't be represented by 90 units fo video either.
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#3 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 24 November 2007 - 12:24 PM

You just answered it. Simply don't burn things out and you'll be fine. 100% white is white. doesn't mean you can have that. And it doesn't mean your whites can't be represented by 90 units fo video either.


Yes, shooting white isn't the problem -- just make sure it doesn't go over 100 IRE and you'll hold some detail in it. The problem are things like what if your actor has dark skin? It all depends on the contrast RANGE you want to hold. If you have darker details that you also need to expose for, it would make life easier for you if you did the room in off-white or extremely light grey rather than pure white.

The Knee or Auto Knee (DCC) function can help you out, just watch out for any weirdness now & then.
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#4 Colm Whelan

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Posted 24 November 2007 - 04:49 PM

Yes, shooting white isn't the problem -- just make sure it doesn't go over 100 IRE and you'll hold some detail in it. The problem are things like what if your actor has dark skin? It all depends on the contrast RANGE you want to hold. If you have darker details that you also need to expose for, it would make life easier for you if you did the room in off-white or extremely light grey rather than pure white.

The Knee or Auto Knee (DCC) function can help you out, just watch out for any weirdness now & then.

i normally have DCC on and that tends to hold it for me once its lit properly. after that its about going as far as I can without burning out. just got a bit freaked cos everyone on the crew seems to think its a mistake. thanks for that
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#5 Walter Graff

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Posted 24 November 2007 - 08:25 PM

i normally have DCC on and that tends to hold it for me once its lit properly. after that its about going as far as I can without burning out. just got a bit freaked cos everyone on the crew seems to think its a mistake. thanks for that


The funny thing about DCC is that years ago we laughed at Sony for even putting it on a camera as a switch and calling it a feature. It was always standard in all cameras and did something that in normal shooting situations meant it should never be turned off (hence why no other manufacturer bothered to make it externally switchable). But today with cine style shooting some folks like to turn it off, but for most shooting situations, you can always leave it on and not do anything adverse to a picture. In fact in most situations (unless you want to screw around with gamma) it's better to have on.
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#6 Michael Nash

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Posted 24 November 2007 - 09:12 PM

It's important to distinguish between "DCC" (AUTO knee) and MANUAL knee. There are those situations where an auto knee response can cause you problems, like multi-camera shooting and zooming. With most cameras to engage the manual knee you have to have DCC "off," (middle position of the toggle switch), and manual knee turned "on" in the menu, depending on the camera.
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#7 Daniel Smith

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Posted 25 November 2007 - 03:35 AM

Zebra?
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#8 Walter Graff

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Posted 25 November 2007 - 10:05 AM

Zebra?


To help detect peak levels without the use of external equipment, cameras have zebras. Zebras are an overlay of a herringbone pattern over the area of the picture that "ring" when that area represents the selected peak value of gray. So if you set your zebras to 80% you will see any area of a picture in your viewfinder ring when that 80% has been hit. It is a good tool to know where facial exposures are or when peak white has been reached when you want to tell the camera to tell you when you've hit a particular gray value. Cameras today have two zebra settings but its often confusing to distinguish both on screen so I suggest you only use one zebra at a time.
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#9 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 25 November 2007 - 01:39 PM

Normally I prefer zebras at 70 IRE, around caucasian skintone luminence (if well-lit, fully exposed), so I have a reference for how I want to expose faces (usually just below the point that the zebras show up). But for a scene in an all-white room where I want to hold detail, I'd probably set it for 99 or 100 IRE.
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#10 Walter Graff

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Posted 25 November 2007 - 02:41 PM

While 70 is great and absolutely acceptable for zebras, most high limit Caucasian skin reflectance values is closer to 80% for Caucasian faces. 70 will simply give you a lot more room. Neither is wrong, just what works best for you.
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