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White light.


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#1 Martin Amezaga

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Posted 25 November 2007 - 10:58 PM

Hi. Im doing a short film soon and I was wondering how can I achive a white light look.
I don`t know If I am expressing my self good enough, but I`m talking about that sort of overcast day light look where eveything seem to be flooded whith white light and light sort of wrap around faces. I think Children of men and Birth, or most Harrys Savides films are good examples of what I`m talking about.

I`m using kodak vision 1, 7279 film stock and tungsten fresnel sources.

-Besides using an 85 filter on camera what should I use to filter my soureces? (I found out that wratten 80 A would correct the color temperature, but would I obtain that white light?)

- Going toward the 5500 Kº, or higher, will always mean a bluer light source and image?

I`ll be very thankfull if someone could help me out. Thanks before hand.

Best regards.
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 25 November 2007 - 11:18 PM

Is this an outdoor shoot in daylight, an indoor shoot mixed with real daylight, or an indoor shoot at night or on a stage with no real daylight to deal with?
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#3 Michael Nash

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Posted 26 November 2007 - 12:16 AM

I don`t know If I am expressing my self good enough, but I`m talking about that sort of overcast day light look where eveything seem to be flooded whith white light and light sort of wrap around faces. I think Children of men and Birth, or most Harrys Savides films are good examples of what I`m talking about.


That's from soft wrap-around lighting, not the color temperature. The only difference is that the color temperature is more likely to be even all around, and not have the bluish tint to shadows filled by blue skylight on a clear sunny day.

As long as your film is balanced to the same color temperature as the light, you shouldn't have a problem rendering the light color as "white."
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#4 Martin Amezaga

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Posted 26 November 2007 - 07:39 AM

Hi, Thanks for the tip Michael.
David. It is an indoor shoot mixed with real day light, and I`m going to use tungsten sources.

again, very thankfull for your answers.
Best regards.
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#5 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 26 November 2007 - 01:07 PM

Hi, Thanks for the tip Michael.
David. It is an indoor shoot mixed with real day light, and I`m going to use tungsten sources.

again, very thankfull for your answers.
Best regards.


Then you need to match your sources to each other if you want "white" light, whether that means gelling the windows orange to 3200K or gelling the tungsten lamps blue to 5500K. You don't necessarily have to use the 85 filter on tungsten stock if shooting indoors under 5500K light -- since the movies you mention have a somewhat cool bias, you could shoot under the daylight-balance without camera filters and correct some, but not all, of the blueness out in post, let the image be a little cold.
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#6 Martin Amezaga

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Posted 26 November 2007 - 10:04 PM

Again, thanks a lot. One more question though regarding to Mr.Mullen`s suggetion to leave the camera unfiltered, wich I would prefer to do if I were using daylight stock.

-If I decide to leave the camera unfiltered I must mantain that desicion trhough out the shooting, including daylight exteriors in order to mantain continuity?

Again. really thankfull.

Best regards.
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#7 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 26 November 2007 - 10:20 PM

Again, thanks a lot. One more question though regarding to Mr.Mullen`s suggetion to leave the camera unfiltered, wich I would prefer to do if I were using daylight stock.

-If I decide to leave the camera unfiltered I must mantain that desicion trhough out the shooting, including daylight exteriors in order to mantain continuity?

Again. really thankfull.

Best regards.


No, you could use the correct filter outdoors but leave it out indoors when the light level is low or you want a cooler balance anyway.

However, if there is some prominently-displayed colored object like a dress of a distinctive color in both locations, indoors and outdoors, it may be safer to shoot the daylight interiors and exteriors the same way in case there is a color shift when correcting for the missing 85 filter.
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